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Вариант № 983650

1.

Вы услышите 6 высказываний. Установите соответствие между высказываниями каждого говорящего A–F и утверждениями, данными в списке 1–7. Используйте каждое утверждение, обозначенное соответствующей цифрой, только один раз. В задании есть одно лишнее утверждение. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

1. It is good to be spontaneous when travelling.

2. Weekends can be really boring.

3. Weekends are perfect for long walks.

4. The best thing about Saturday morning is breakfast.

5. It’s good to get outside at the weekend.

6. Sundays are for meeting friends and chatting.

7. Sport is more about fun than prizes.

 

ГоворящийABCDEF
Утверждение

2.

Вы услышите диалог. Определите, какие из приведённых утверждений А–G соответствуют содержанию текста (1 – True), какие не соответствуют (2 – False) и о чём в тексте не сказано, то есть на основании текста нельзя дать ни положительного, ни отрицательного ответа (3 – Not stated). Занесите номер выбранного Вами варианта ответа в таблицу. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

A) Rock stars’ income cannot be compared with income in any other professional category.

B) Some rock stars admit that they earn more than they deserve.

C) Being a good singer is more important than being lucky in show business.

D) Star fans are not happy when a rock star appears too often on TV and in movies.

E) Rock stars support charity programs in many different ways.

F) Most rock stars end their life in poverty.

G) The stage life of many rock stars is not long.

 

Запишите в ответ цифры, расположив их в порядке, соответствующем буквам:

ABCDEFG
       

3.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

What’s the main role of English in India according to the speaker?

 

1) Enabling communication between the country’s people.

2) Serving as the language of Indian Mass Media.

3) Connecting India with the rest of the world.

4.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Which of the following is TRUE about Indian English?

 

1) It has specific features in grammar as well as in vocabulary and phonetics.

2) It exists only in local newspapers.

3) It’s similar to Australian English.

5.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

What, according to the speaker, partly explains the specifics of Indian English?

 

1) Education traditions in India.

2) Indian history and culture.

3) Structure of local languages.

6.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Which of the following is mentioned as a grammatical feature of Indian English?

 

1) Use of a plural form of a certain word in relation to a single object.

2) Avoiding use of the progressive tense.

3) Overuse of the definite article.

7.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Which of the following phrases is used in Indian English for “How can I help you?”?

 

1) Where are you put up?

2) Hello, what do you want?

3) Tell me …

8.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

What does the speaker say about the language of Indian teenagers?

 

1) It makes Indian English more modern.

2) It’s devised to confuse older people.

3) It consists of slang mostly.

9.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

What’s the basic direction of changes in modern Indian English according to the speaker?

 

1) Purification.

2) Simplification.

3) Localization.

10.

Установите соответствие между заголовками 1–8 и текстами A–G. Запишите свои ответы в таблицу. Используйте каждую цифру только один раз. В задании есть один лишний заголовок.

 

1. For parents and friends

2. Radiation threat

3. Threat for kids

4. Feeling of safety

5. Mobile future

6. Mobile booking office

7. New language

8. SMS to premier

 

A. Mobile phones use ‘radio waves’ to send signals. Since the 1920s, scientists have known that radio waves can cause the heating of the skin and influence the nervous system. But mobile phones don’t produce many radio waves. Still children should be especially careful about mobile phone use because their nervous system may be hurt. Children should only use mobiles for short calls.

 

B. It is known that the strength of radio wave radiation decreases with distance. It suggests that hands-free sets may be effective in avoiding all the dangers of mobile phones. But another study described an increase in radiation that reached the user of a hands-free set. It says that the cable of the hands-free set acted as an antenna, directing more radio waves into the user’s ear.

 

C. Train passengers will soon be able to buy tickets on their mobile phone. Chiltern Railways plans to sell tickets through mobile phones. The new technology sends a code to a mobile phone in a text message, which passengers can then scan at the station ticket barrier. It’s hoped the method will make buying tickets easier for passengers and help fight against queues at stations.

 

D. Many parents now use mobiles to control their children’s behaviour. It gives parents peace of mind and makes young people feel protected. Parents say that young people are safer with mobiles than without them. But, while parents said they liked to call their children on the mobile to actually hear their voice, young people liked to send text messages to parents.

 

E. A research showed that those young people who have a mobile feel more independent and often use it to plan meetings both relatives and peers. In particular, young people often use mobiles to ask their parents if they can come home later. The study showed that girls more often text parents to let them know they were safe than boys. They also use text messaging for socializing purposes.

 

F. It is not only parents who want to connect with young people through mobile technologies. Nowadays politicians and different organizations look for ways to use text messaging as a channel for communication with the young. In late 2004, the UK government offered people the opportunity to ‘text Tony’. People were invited to send a text question to the prime minister to be answered as part of a ‘mobile chat’.

 

G. The popularity of text messages led to the development of a special system of words or ‘chat speak’. For example, acronyms, that are words made from the first letters of other words, are often used both in online chatrooms and text messages sent to your mobile phone. This ‘chat speak’ is very popular with children who are fast at texting. Parents might be interested to know that ‘PAW’ means ‘parents are watching’!

 

ТекстABCDEFG
Заголовок

11.

Прочитайте текст и заполните пропуски A–F частями предложений, обозначенными цифрами 1–7. Одна из частей в списке 1–7 — лишняя. Занесите цифры, обозначающие соответствующие части предложений, в таблицу.

 

 

Scotland Yard

 

Scotland Yard is the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police in London. To most people, its name immediately brings to mind the picture of a detective — cool, efficient, ready to track down any criminal, or a helmeted police constable — A ___________________ and trusty helper of every traveller from overseas.

Scotland Yard is situated on the Thames Embankment close to the Houses of Parliament and the familiar clock tower of Big Ben, and its jurisdiction extends over 740 square miles with the exception of the ancient City of London, B _________________.

One of the most successful developments in Scotland Yard’s crime detection and emergency service has been the “999 system”. On receipt of a call the 999 Room operator ascertains by electronic device the position of the nearest available police car, C __________________. Almost instantly a message is also sent by teleprinter to the police station concerned so that within seconds of a call for assistance being received, a police car is on its way to the scene. An old-established section of the Metropolitan police is the Mounted Branch, with its strength of about 200 horses stabled at strategic points. These horses are particularly suited to ceremonial occasions, D __________________.

An interesting branch of Scotland Yard is the branch of Police Dogs, first used as an experiment in 1939. Now these dogs are an important part of the Force. One dog, for example, can search a warehouse in ten minutes, E _________.

There is also the River Police, or Thames Division, which deals with all crimes occurring within its river boundaries.

There are two other departments of Scotland Yard – the Witness Room (known as the Rogues’ Gallery) where a photographic record of known and suspected criminals is kept, and the Museum, F _________________.

 

1. which is contacted by radio

2. that familiar figure of the London scene

3. for they are accustomed to military bands

4. which possesses its own separate police force

5. which contains murder relics and forgery exhibits

6. that this policeman will bring the criminal to justice

7. whereas the same search would take six men an hour

 

ПропускABCDEF
Часть предложения

12.

What kind of a phone does the author want her children to have first?

 

1) An old-type phone.

2) A modern phone.

3) Something like her “old” phone.

4) Something like her parents’ phone.


The lure of the screen

I used to tell my parents that the first cell phone I will allow my own children to have will be a flip phone, incapable of Internet access and certainly without the ability to use “apps.” I argued that their first phones would have only the capabilities of my first phone – texting and calling – used primarily to contact their parents, and once in a while classmates to ask about homework. Isn’t it primarily what we think kids need phones for?

It took me a while to realize how impractical this was because if the first piece of a given technology that I possessed had been the same as my parents’, I would have been walking around with a cassette player in a world of iPods (incidentally, I loved my Sony Walkman CD player).

So maybe it was a little ridiculous for me to suggest this, but I think my point was (and is) valid. I look at young kids today and see that they’re as attached to mobile devices as their adult counterparts. It has come to the point where kids would rather sit inside and play games on their parents’ (or their own) iPads than go outside and play hide-and-seek, or catch, well, do anything.

And while I recall my parents telling me to drop the Legos or even the PlayStation controller and head outside, I, unlike these children, often actually did it, and when I didn’t, at least I was capable of breaking away to utter a response.

Today, however, youngsters are becoming so attached to technology at such a young age, as young as 3 or 4, that they are forgetting – if they ever learned in the first place – how to have fun without an iPad – literally.

In April, The Telegraph quoted North Ireland teacher Colin Kinney, who said his colleagues, “have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialize with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Kinney goes on to say that the “brilliant computer skills” these children possess is “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks.”

It is true that we are moving into a world in which the ability to understand the language of computer coding is more important than the ability to read and write cursive. This, however, is not an excuse for the extent to which young children have become as addicted (or more so) to their mobile devices as their parents.

LeapFrog, the popular children’s brand is set to unveil a product called the Leap Band; the first wearable tech catered specifically toward children. And although the wristwatch-like product is designed to get kids up and moving, it raises a question for me: How young is too young?

I read that Google is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 (though giving their parents control over how the service is used).

Because of this cross-generational addiction, this week has been designated as “Screen Free Week” in schools around the country. The week is aimed at getting every member of the family away from computer and device use for just one week and head outside.

For parents, technology is now a dilemma: Give it to their kids at a young age so they are in line with their classmates in terms of computer prowess or withhold it and allow them the gift of social skills … only time will tell, but I fear the former is gaining ground.

13.

Which of the following statements reflects the author’s views?

 

1) Parents shouldn’t allow their children to play games on iPads.

2) Children are more attached to technology than adults.

3) It’s hard to imagine the modern life without mobile devices.

4) Children now prefer their gadgets to outdoor games.


The lure of the screen

I used to tell my parents that the first cell phone I will allow my own children to have will be a flip phone, incapable of Internet access and certainly without the ability to use “apps.” I argued that their first phones would have only the capabilities of my first phone – texting and calling – used primarily to contact their parents, and once in a while classmates to ask about homework. Isn’t it primarily what we think kids need phones for?

It took me a while to realize how impractical this was because if the first piece of a given technology that I possessed had been the same as my parents’, I would have been walking around with a cassette player in a world of iPods (incidentally, I loved my Sony Walkman CD player).

So maybe it was a little ridiculous for me to suggest this, but I think my point was (and is) valid. I look at young kids today and see that they’re as attached to mobile devices as their adult counterparts. It has come to the point where kids would rather sit inside and play games on their parents’ (or their own) iPads than go outside and play hide-and-seek, or catch, well, do anything.

And while I recall my parents telling me to drop the Legos or even the PlayStation controller and head outside, I, unlike these children, often actually did it, and when I didn’t, at least I was capable of breaking away to utter a response.

Today, however, youngsters are becoming so attached to technology at such a young age, as young as 3 or 4, that they are forgetting – if they ever learned in the first place – how to have fun without an iPad – literally.

In April, The Telegraph quoted North Ireland teacher Colin Kinney, who said his colleagues, “have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialize with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Kinney goes on to say that the “brilliant computer skills” these children possess is “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks.”

It is true that we are moving into a world in which the ability to understand the language of computer coding is more important than the ability to read and write cursive. This, however, is not an excuse for the extent to which young children have become as addicted (or more so) to their mobile devices as their parents.

LeapFrog, the popular children’s brand is set to unveil a product called the Leap Band; the first wearable tech catered specifically toward children. And although the wristwatch-like product is designed to get kids up and moving, it raises a question for me: How young is too young?

I read that Google is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 (though giving their parents control over how the service is used).

Because of this cross-generational addiction, this week has been designated as “Screen Free Week” in schools around the country. The week is aimed at getting every member of the family away from computer and device use for just one week and head outside.

For parents, technology is now a dilemma: Give it to their kids at a young age so they are in line with their classmates in terms of computer prowess or withhold it and allow them the gift of social skills … only time will tell, but I fear the former is gaining ground.

14.

What does the author remember about her childhood?

 

1) She preferred to ignore her parents when she played.

2) She went for a walk outside whenever her parents told her.

3) She didn’t like to play outside.

4) She enjoyed PlayStation more than Lego.


The lure of the screen

I used to tell my parents that the first cell phone I will allow my own children to have will be a flip phone, incapable of Internet access and certainly without the ability to use “apps.” I argued that their first phones would have only the capabilities of my first phone – texting and calling – used primarily to contact their parents, and once in a while classmates to ask about homework. Isn’t it primarily what we think kids need phones for?

It took me a while to realize how impractical this was because if the first piece of a given technology that I possessed had been the same as my parents’, I would have been walking around with a cassette player in a world of iPods (incidentally, I loved my Sony Walkman CD player).

So maybe it was a little ridiculous for me to suggest this, but I think my point was (and is) valid. I look at young kids today and see that they’re as attached to mobile devices as their adult counterparts. It has come to the point where kids would rather sit inside and play games on their parents’ (or their own) iPads than go outside and play hide-and-seek, or catch, well, do anything.

And while I recall my parents telling me to drop the Legos or even the PlayStation controller and head outside, I, unlike these children, often actually did it, and when I didn’t, at least I was capable of breaking away to utter a response.

Today, however, youngsters are becoming so attached to technology at such a young age, as young as 3 or 4, that they are forgetting – if they ever learned in the first place – how to have fun without an iPad – literally.

In April, The Telegraph quoted North Ireland teacher Colin Kinney, who said his colleagues, “have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialize with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Kinney goes on to say that the “brilliant computer skills” these children possess is “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks.”

It is true that we are moving into a world in which the ability to understand the language of computer coding is more important than the ability to read and write cursive. This, however, is not an excuse for the extent to which young children have become as addicted (or more so) to their mobile devices as their parents.

LeapFrog, the popular children’s brand is set to unveil a product called the Leap Band; the first wearable tech catered specifically toward children. And although the wristwatch-like product is designed to get kids up and moving, it raises a question for me: How young is too young?

I read that Google is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 (though giving their parents control over how the service is used).

Because of this cross-generational addiction, this week has been designated as “Screen Free Week” in schools around the country. The week is aimed at getting every member of the family away from computer and device use for just one week and head outside.

For parents, technology is now a dilemma: Give it to their kids at a young age so they are in line with their classmates in terms of computer prowess or withhold it and allow them the gift of social skills … only time will tell, but I fear the former is gaining ground.

15.

Teacher Kinney is worried about children’s …

 

1) writing skills.

2) communicative skills.

3) computer skills.

4) parents’ attitudes.


The lure of the screen

I used to tell my parents that the first cell phone I will allow my own children to have will be a flip phone, incapable of Internet access and certainly without the ability to use “apps.” I argued that their first phones would have only the capabilities of my first phone – texting and calling – used primarily to contact their parents, and once in a while classmates to ask about homework. Isn’t it primarily what we think kids need phones for?

It took me a while to realize how impractical this was because if the first piece of a given technology that I possessed had been the same as my parents’, I would have been walking around with a cassette player in a world of iPods (incidentally, I loved my Sony Walkman CD player).

So maybe it was a little ridiculous for me to suggest this, but I think my point was (and is) valid. I look at young kids today and see that they’re as attached to mobile devices as their adult counterparts. It has come to the point where kids would rather sit inside and play games on their parents’ (or their own) iPads than go outside and play hide-and-seek, or catch, well, do anything.

And while I recall my parents telling me to drop the Legos or even the PlayStation controller and head outside, I, unlike these children, often actually did it, and when I didn’t, at least I was capable of breaking away to utter a response.

Today, however, youngsters are becoming so attached to technology at such a young age, as young as 3 or 4, that they are forgetting – if they ever learned in the first place – how to have fun without an iPad – literally.

In April, The Telegraph quoted North Ireland teacher Colin Kinney, who said his colleagues, “have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialize with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Kinney goes on to say that the “brilliant computer skills” these children possess is “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks.”

It is true that we are moving into a world in which the ability to understand the language of computer coding is more important than the ability to read and write cursive. This, however, is not an excuse for the extent to which young children have become as addicted (or more so) to their mobile devices as their parents.

LeapFrog, the popular children’s brand is set to unveil a product called the Leap Band; the first wearable tech catered specifically toward children. And although the wristwatch-like product is designed to get kids up and moving, it raises a question for me: How young is too young?

I read that Google is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 (though giving their parents control over how the service is used).

Because of this cross-generational addiction, this week has been designated as “Screen Free Week” in schools around the country. The week is aimed at getting every member of the family away from computer and device use for just one week and head outside.

For parents, technology is now a dilemma: Give it to their kids at a young age so they are in line with their classmates in terms of computer prowess or withhold it and allow them the gift of social skills … only time will tell, but I fear the former is gaining ground.

16.

“This” in paragraph 8 (This, however, is not an excuse …) refers to …

 

1) importance of computers.

2) literacy skills.

3) computer language.

4) addiction to technology.


The lure of the screen

I used to tell my parents that the first cell phone I will allow my own children to have will be a flip phone, incapable of Internet access and certainly without the ability to use “apps.” I argued that their first phones would have only the capabilities of my first phone – texting and calling – used primarily to contact their parents, and once in a while classmates to ask about homework. Isn’t it primarily what we think kids need phones for?

It took me a while to realize how impractical this was because if the first piece of a given technology that I possessed had been the same as my parents’, I would have been walking around with a cassette player in a world of iPods (incidentally, I loved my Sony Walkman CD player).

So maybe it was a little ridiculous for me to suggest this, but I think my point was (and is) valid. I look at young kids today and see that they’re as attached to mobile devices as their adult counterparts. It has come to the point where kids would rather sit inside and play games on their parents’ (or their own) iPads than go outside and play hide-and-seek, or catch, well, do anything.

And while I recall my parents telling me to drop the Legos or even the PlayStation controller and head outside, I, unlike these children, often actually did it, and when I didn’t, at least I was capable of breaking away to utter a response.

Today, however, youngsters are becoming so attached to technology at such a young age, as young as 3 or 4, that they are forgetting – if they ever learned in the first place – how to have fun without an iPad – literally.

In April, The Telegraph quoted North Ireland teacher Colin Kinney, who said his colleagues, “have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialize with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Kinney goes on to say that the “brilliant computer skills” these children possess is “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks.”

It is true that we are moving into a world in which the ability to understand the language of computer coding is more important than the ability to read and write cursive. This, however, is not an excuse for the extent to which young children have become as addicted (or more so) to their mobile devices as their parents.

LeapFrog, the popular children’s brand is set to unveil a product called the Leap Band; the first wearable tech catered specifically toward children. And although the wristwatch-like product is designed to get kids up and moving, it raises a question for me: How young is too young?

I read that Google is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 (though giving their parents control over how the service is used).

Because of this cross-generational addiction, this week has been designated as “Screen Free Week” in schools around the country. The week is aimed at getting every member of the family away from computer and device use for just one week and head outside.

For parents, technology is now a dilemma: Give it to their kids at a young age so they are in line with their classmates in terms of computer prowess or withhold it and allow them the gift of social skills … only time will tell, but I fear the former is gaining ground.

17.

What does the author imply by asking “How young is too young”?

 

1) Leap Band products suit any child.

2) Wristwatch-like products are for older children.

3) Technology may enter children’s life too early.

4) Leap Band is inappropriate for young children.


The lure of the screen

I used to tell my parents that the first cell phone I will allow my own children to have will be a flip phone, incapable of Internet access and certainly without the ability to use “apps.” I argued that their first phones would have only the capabilities of my first phone – texting and calling – used primarily to contact their parents, and once in a while classmates to ask about homework. Isn’t it primarily what we think kids need phones for?

It took me a while to realize how impractical this was because if the first piece of a given technology that I possessed had been the same as my parents’, I would have been walking around with a cassette player in a world of iPods (incidentally, I loved my Sony Walkman CD player).

So maybe it was a little ridiculous for me to suggest this, but I think my point was (and is) valid. I look at young kids today and see that they’re as attached to mobile devices as their adult counterparts. It has come to the point where kids would rather sit inside and play games on their parents’ (or their own) iPads than go outside and play hide-and-seek, or catch, well, do anything.

And while I recall my parents telling me to drop the Legos or even the PlayStation controller and head outside, I, unlike these children, often actually did it, and when I didn’t, at least I was capable of breaking away to utter a response.

Today, however, youngsters are becoming so attached to technology at such a young age, as young as 3 or 4, that they are forgetting – if they ever learned in the first place – how to have fun without an iPad – literally.

In April, The Telegraph quoted North Ireland teacher Colin Kinney, who said his colleagues, “have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialize with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Kinney goes on to say that the “brilliant computer skills” these children possess is “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks.”

It is true that we are moving into a world in which the ability to understand the language of computer coding is more important than the ability to read and write cursive. This, however, is not an excuse for the extent to which young children have become as addicted (or more so) to their mobile devices as their parents.

LeapFrog, the popular children’s brand is set to unveil a product called the Leap Band; the first wearable tech catered specifically toward children. And although the wristwatch-like product is designed to get kids up and moving, it raises a question for me: How young is too young?

I read that Google is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 (though giving their parents control over how the service is used).

Because of this cross-generational addiction, this week has been designated as “Screen Free Week” in schools around the country. The week is aimed at getting every member of the family away from computer and device use for just one week and head outside.

For parents, technology is now a dilemma: Give it to their kids at a young age so they are in line with their classmates in terms of computer prowess or withhold it and allow them the gift of social skills … only time will tell, but I fear the former is gaining ground.

18.

How, according to the author, will the parents solve the technological dilemma?

 

1) In favour of the computer skills.

2) In favour of both the computer and communication skills.

3) They will try to refrain from making the decision.

4) In favour of communication skills.


The lure of the screen

I used to tell my parents that the first cell phone I will allow my own children to have will be a flip phone, incapable of Internet access and certainly without the ability to use “apps.” I argued that their first phones would have only the capabilities of my first phone – texting and calling – used primarily to contact their parents, and once in a while classmates to ask about homework. Isn’t it primarily what we think kids need phones for?

It took me a while to realize how impractical this was because if the first piece of a given technology that I possessed had been the same as my parents’, I would have been walking around with a cassette player in a world of iPods (incidentally, I loved my Sony Walkman CD player).

So maybe it was a little ridiculous for me to suggest this, but I think my point was (and is) valid. I look at young kids today and see that they’re as attached to mobile devices as their adult counterparts. It has come to the point where kids would rather sit inside and play games on their parents’ (or their own) iPads than go outside and play hide-and-seek, or catch, well, do anything.

And while I recall my parents telling me to drop the Legos or even the PlayStation controller and head outside, I, unlike these children, often actually did it, and when I didn’t, at least I was capable of breaking away to utter a response.

Today, however, youngsters are becoming so attached to technology at such a young age, as young as 3 or 4, that they are forgetting – if they ever learned in the first place – how to have fun without an iPad – literally.

In April, The Telegraph quoted North Ireland teacher Colin Kinney, who said his colleagues, “have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialize with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Kinney goes on to say that the “brilliant computer skills” these children possess is “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks.”

It is true that we are moving into a world in which the ability to understand the language of computer coding is more important than the ability to read and write cursive. This, however, is not an excuse for the extent to which young children have become as addicted (or more so) to their mobile devices as their parents.

LeapFrog, the popular children’s brand is set to unveil a product called the Leap Band; the first wearable tech catered specifically toward children. And although the wristwatch-like product is designed to get kids up and moving, it raises a question for me: How young is too young?

I read that Google is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 (though giving their parents control over how the service is used).

Because of this cross-generational addiction, this week has been designated as “Screen Free Week” in schools around the country. The week is aimed at getting every member of the family away from computer and device use for just one week and head outside.

For parents, technology is now a dilemma: Give it to their kids at a young age so they are in line with their classmates in terms of computer prowess or withhold it and allow them the gift of social skills … only time will tell, but I fear the former is gaining ground.

19.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово WIFE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

 

A Smart Boy

 

Mr. Jones and Mr. Brown worked in the same office. Their ______ were good friends. One day Mr. Jones invited Mr. Brown to a small party.

20.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово SURPRISE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

J Mr. Brown went into the other room and telephoned. He ______ very much by his telephone conversation.

21.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово NOT BE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

When he came back Mr. Jones asked him, “Have you spoken to your wife already?” “No, she ______ there when I phoned. My small son answered the phone. I asked him, “Is your mother there?” And he said, “She is somewhere outside”.

22.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово LOOK так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

“Why is she outside?” I asked. “She ______ for me”, he answered.

23.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово POPULAR так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

 

Maslenitsa

 

Have you ever celebrated Maslenitsa? It is one of the ______ festivals in Russia. It signals the end of winter and welcomes the coming of spring.

24.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово EAT так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Russian pancakes blini — are very important in the celebration of Maslenitsa. Blini ______ with jam, sour cream, and ofcourse, lots of butter.

25.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово GET так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Warm, round, and golden — blini are the symbol of the sun! Ancient Russians actually believed that when eating a pancake, they ______ a part of the Sun’s life energy.

26.

Образуйте от слова DEFENSE однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

 

Castle Clinton

 

Castle Clinton was built in the times of Napoleonic wars and great tension between Britain and the US. New York was almost ______ and in a short time five new forts, Castle Clinton among them, were built.

27.

Образуйте от слова ENTERTAIN однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

However, it was never used as a fortress. In 1824, it became a place of public ______ .

28.

Образуйте от слова SCIENCE однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

A newspaper described it as a «fanciful garden, tastefully ornamented with shrubs and flowers». The garden was the setting for band concerts, fireworks and demonstrations of the latest ______ achievements.

29.

Образуйте от слова REMARK однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Many ______ people were honored at the Garden, President Andrew Jackson among them.

30.

Образуйте от слова VISIT однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

In 1896 Castle Clinton became the city Aquarium and thousands of ______ rushed to see fish that came from the waters around New York.

31.

Образуйте от слова VARY однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Later exotic fish from around the world were brought to the Aquarium and the collection grew in number and ______ .

32.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) held

2) took

3) kept

4) used


Margaret

Old Margaret was just the kind of cook that we wanted. Lots of cooks can do rich to cook simple, everyday dishes dishes well. Margaret couldn’t. But she 32 ______ in a way that made our mouths water. Her apple-pies were the best pies I’ve ever tasted.

 

But to 33 ______ the truth, even Margaret sometimes miscalculated. A large, royal-looking steak would be set before Father, which, upon being cut into, would turn 34 ______ to be underdone. Father’s face would darken with disappointment. He would raise his foot and stamp slowly and heavily three times on the rug.

At this solemn 35 ______ , we would hear Margaret leave the kitchen below us and come up the stairs to the dining-room door.

 

“Margaret, look at the steak.”

 

Margaret would peer with a shocked look at the platter. She would then seize the platter and make off with it.

 

Father and Margaret were united by the intense interest they both took in cooking. Each understood the other instinctively. I have to 36 ______ that they had a complete fellow-feeling. Mother’s great interest was in babies. She loved her children and her happiness depended 37 ______ them. She wanted to keep Father pleased somehow, and if it was too difficult or impossible she didn’t always care about even that.

 

At table it was Father who carved the fowl, or sliced the roast lamb or beef. I liked to 38 ______ him take the knife and go at it. And usually the cooking had been as superb as the carving. Sometimes it was so perfect that Father would summon Margaret and say in a low voice, “You are a good cook”.

33.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) talk

2) tell

3) say

4) speak


Margaret

Old Margaret was just the kind of cook that we wanted. Lots of cooks can do rich to cook simple, everyday dishes dishes well. Margaret couldn’t. But she 32 ______ in a way that made our mouths water. Her apple-pies were the best pies I’ve ever tasted.

 

But to 33 ______ the truth, even Margaret sometimes miscalculated. A large, royal-looking steak would be set before Father, which, upon being cut into, would turn 34 ______ to be underdone. Father’s face would darken with disappointment. He would raise his foot and stamp slowly and heavily three times on the rug.

At this solemn 35 ______ , we would hear Margaret leave the kitchen below us and come up the stairs to the dining-room door.

 

“Margaret, look at the steak.”

 

Margaret would peer with a shocked look at the platter. She would then seize the platter and make off with it.

 

Father and Margaret were united by the intense interest they both took in cooking. Each understood the other instinctively. I have to 36 ______ that they had a complete fellow-feeling. Mother’s great interest was in babies. She loved her children and her happiness depended 37 ______ them. She wanted to keep Father pleased somehow, and if it was too difficult or impossible she didn’t always care about even that.

 

At table it was Father who carved the fowl, or sliced the roast lamb or beef. I liked to 38 ______ him take the knife and go at it. And usually the cooking had been as superb as the carving. Sometimes it was so perfect that Father would summon Margaret and say in a low voice, “You are a good cook”.

34.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) into

2) of

3) out

4) over


Margaret

Old Margaret was just the kind of cook that we wanted. Lots of cooks can do rich to cook simple, everyday dishes dishes well. Margaret couldn’t. But she 32 ______ in a way that made our mouths water. Her apple-pies were the best pies I’ve ever tasted.

 

But to 33 ______ the truth, even Margaret sometimes miscalculated. A large, royal-looking steak would be set before Father, which, upon being cut into, would turn 34 ______ to be underdone. Father’s face would darken with disappointment. He would raise his foot and stamp slowly and heavily three times on the rug.

At this solemn 35 ______ , we would hear Margaret leave the kitchen below us and come up the stairs to the dining-room door.

 

“Margaret, look at the steak.”

 

Margaret would peer with a shocked look at the platter. She would then seize the platter and make off with it.

 

Father and Margaret were united by the intense interest they both took in cooking. Each understood the other instinctively. I have to 36 ______ that they had a complete fellow-feeling. Mother’s great interest was in babies. She loved her children and her happiness depended 37 ______ them. She wanted to keep Father pleased somehow, and if it was too difficult or impossible she didn’t always care about even that.

 

At table it was Father who carved the fowl, or sliced the roast lamb or beef. I liked to 38 ______ him take the knife and go at it. And usually the cooking had been as superb as the carving. Sometimes it was so perfect that Father would summon Margaret and say in a low voice, “You are a good cook”.

35.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) gesture

2) agree

3) movement

4) signal


Margaret

Old Margaret was just the kind of cook that we wanted. Lots of cooks can do rich to cook simple, everyday dishes dishes well. Margaret couldn’t. But she 32 ______ in a way that made our mouths water. Her apple-pies were the best pies I’ve ever tasted.

 

But to 33 ______ the truth, even Margaret sometimes miscalculated. A large, royal-looking steak would be set before Father, which, upon being cut into, would turn 34 ______ to be underdone. Father’s face would darken with disappointment. He would raise his foot and stamp slowly and heavily three times on the rug.

At this solemn 35 ______ , we would hear Margaret leave the kitchen below us and come up the stairs to the dining-room door.

 

“Margaret, look at the steak.”

 

Margaret would peer with a shocked look at the platter. She would then seize the platter and make off with it.

 

Father and Margaret were united by the intense interest they both took in cooking. Each understood the other instinctively. I have to 36 ______ that they had a complete fellow-feeling. Mother’s great interest was in babies. She loved her children and her happiness depended 37 ______ them. She wanted to keep Father pleased somehow, and if it was too difficult or impossible she didn’t always care about even that.

 

At table it was Father who carved the fowl, or sliced the roast lamb or beef. I liked to 38 ______ him take the knife and go at it. And usually the cooking had been as superb as the carving. Sometimes it was so perfect that Father would summon Margaret and say in a low voice, “You are a good cook”.

36.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) admit

2) on

3) accept

4) adopt


Margaret

Old Margaret was just the kind of cook that we wanted. Lots of cooks can do rich to cook simple, everyday dishes dishes well. Margaret couldn’t. But she 32 ______ in a way that made our mouths water. Her apple-pies were the best pies I’ve ever tasted.

 

But to 33 ______ the truth, even Margaret sometimes miscalculated. A large, royal-looking steak would be set before Father, which, upon being cut into, would turn 34 ______ to be underdone. Father’s face would darken with disappointment. He would raise his foot and stamp slowly and heavily three times on the rug.

At this solemn 35 ______ , we would hear Margaret leave the kitchen below us and come up the stairs to the dining-room door.

 

“Margaret, look at the steak.”

 

Margaret would peer with a shocked look at the platter. She would then seize the platter and make off with it.

 

Father and Margaret were united by the intense interest they both took in cooking. Each understood the other instinctively. I have to 36 ______ that they had a complete fellow-feeling. Mother’s great interest was in babies. She loved her children and her happiness depended 37 ______ them. She wanted to keep Father pleased somehow, and if it was too difficult or impossible she didn’t always care about even that.

 

At table it was Father who carved the fowl, or sliced the roast lamb or beef. I liked to 38 ______ him take the knife and go at it. And usually the cooking had been as superb as the carving. Sometimes it was so perfect that Father would summon Margaret and say in a low voice, “You are a good cook”.

37.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) at

2) on

3) of

4) in


Margaret

Old Margaret was just the kind of cook that we wanted. Lots of cooks can do rich to cook simple, everyday dishes dishes well. Margaret couldn’t. But she 32 ______ in a way that made our mouths water. Her apple-pies were the best pies I’ve ever tasted.

 

But to 33 ______ the truth, even Margaret sometimes miscalculated. A large, royal-looking steak would be set before Father, which, upon being cut into, would turn 34 ______ to be underdone. Father’s face would darken with disappointment. He would raise his foot and stamp slowly and heavily three times on the rug.

At this solemn 35 ______ , we would hear Margaret leave the kitchen below us and come up the stairs to the dining-room door.

 

“Margaret, look at the steak.”

 

Margaret would peer with a shocked look at the platter. She would then seize the platter and make off with it.

 

Father and Margaret were united by the intense interest they both took in cooking. Each understood the other instinctively. I have to 36 ______ that they had a complete fellow-feeling. Mother’s great interest was in babies. She loved her children and her happiness depended 37 ______ them. She wanted to keep Father pleased somehow, and if it was too difficult or impossible she didn’t always care about even that.

 

At table it was Father who carved the fowl, or sliced the roast lamb or beef. I liked to 38 ______ him take the knife and go at it. And usually the cooking had been as superb as the carving. Sometimes it was so perfect that Father would summon Margaret and say in a low voice, “You are a good cook”.

38.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) look

2) see

3) watch

4) gaze


Margaret

Old Margaret was just the kind of cook that we wanted. Lots of cooks can do rich to cook simple, everyday dishes dishes well. Margaret couldn’t. But she 32 ______ in a way that made our mouths water. Her apple-pies were the best pies I’ve ever tasted.

 

But to 33 ______ the truth, even Margaret sometimes miscalculated. A large, royal-looking steak would be set before Father, which, upon being cut into, would turn 34 ______ to be underdone. Father’s face would darken with disappointment. He would raise his foot and stamp slowly and heavily three times on the rug.

At this solemn 35 ______ , we would hear Margaret leave the kitchen below us and come up the stairs to the dining-room door.

 

“Margaret, look at the steak.”

 

Margaret would peer with a shocked look at the platter. She would then seize the platter and make off with it.

 

Father and Margaret were united by the intense interest they both took in cooking. Each understood the other instinctively. I have to 36 ______ that they had a complete fellow-feeling. Mother’s great interest was in babies. She loved her children and her happiness depended 37 ______ them. She wanted to keep Father pleased somehow, and if it was too difficult or impossible she didn’t always care about even that.

 

At table it was Father who carved the fowl, or sliced the roast lamb or beef. I liked to 38 ______ him take the knife and go at it. And usually the cooking had been as superb as the carving. Sometimes it was so perfect that Father would summon Margaret and say in a low voice, “You are a good cook”.

39.

You have received a letter from your New Zealand pen-friend Ann who writes:

 

...We are going to visit Moscow in September. What’s the weather like then? Do we need to bring our warm coats? My mum is a vegetarian, she eats lots of fruit. What sort of fruit will she find in Russia? My dad would like you to tell us what we could visit in a week.

By the way, yesterday I bought the necessary vegetables and cooked Russian borsch. Thank you for the recipe. Everyone liked it very much...

 

Write a letter to Ann. In your letter answer her questions, ask 3 questions about her favourite food. Write 100—140 words. Remember the rules of letter writing. You have 20 minutes to do this task.

40.

Выберите только ОДНО из двух предложенных высказываний и выразите своё мнение по предложенной проблеме согласно данному плану.

 

Comment on one of the following statements.

 

1. Some people prefer to eat out. However, many people still like to cook meals at home.

2. A pupil cannot study effectively without a computer.

 

What is your opinion? Do you agree with this statement? Write 200–250 words. Use the following plan:

− make an introduction (state the problem)

− express your personal opinion and give 2–3 reasons for your opinion

− express an opposing opinion and give 1–2 reasons for this opposing opinion

− explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion

− make a conclusion restating your position

41.

Imagine that you are preparing a project with your friend. You have found some interesting material for the presentation and you want to read this text to your friend. You have 1.5 minutes to read the text silently, then be ready to read it out aloud. You will not have more than 1.5 minutes to read it.

 

Nelson never wore an eye-patch. He didn’t wear anything at all over his damaged right eye. Though he had an eye-shade built into his hat to protect his good left eye from the sun. Nelson didn’t have a blind eye. His right one was badly damaged at the siege in 1794. A French cannon ball threw sand and debris into it, but it still looked normal – so normal, in fact, he had difficulty convincing the Royal Navy he was eligible for a disability pension.

There is no contemporary portrait of Nelson wearing an eye-patch, and despite what most people recall having seen, the prominent column shows him without an eye-patch. It was only after his death that the eye-patch was used to add pathos to portraits. He used the damaged eye to his advantage. At the battle of Copenhagen, he ignored the recall signal issued by his superior.

42.

Study the advertisement.

 

 

You are considering buying a laptop and you'd like to get more information. In 1.5 minutes you are to ask five direct questions to find out the following:

1) if you can get a discount card

2) full characteristics of the device

3) warranty period

4) advantages of the device

5) if they take credit cards

You have 20 seconds to ask each question.

43.

These are photos from your photo album. Choose one photo to describe to your friend.

 

 

You will have to start speaking in 1.5 minutes and will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). In your talk remember to speak about:

• where and when the photo was taken

• what/who is in the photo

• what is happening

• why you keep the photo in your album

• why you decided to show the picture to your friend

You have to talk continuously, starting with: "I’ve chosen photo number… "

44.

Study the two photographs. In 1.5 minutes be ready to compare and contrast the photographs:

 

• give a brief description of the photos (action, location)

• say what the pictures have in common

• say in what way the pictures are different

• say which photographer presented in the photos you prefer

• explain why

 

You will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). You have to talk continuously.