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Вариант № 983646

1.

Вы услышите 6 высказываний. Установите соответствие между высказываниями каждого говорящего A–F и утверждениями, данными в списке 1–7. Используйте каждое утверждение, обозначенное соответствующей цифрой, только один раз. В задании есть одно лишнее утверждение. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

1. The speaker had a lot of arguments and fights with her/his classmates.

2. The speaker thought that she/he was going to be a student forever.

3. The speaker learned very important social skills in high school.

4. The speaker found school to be a hiding place in times of trouble.

5. The speaker thought of her/his class in high school as a family.

6. The speaker showed little interest in her/his studies in high school.

7. The speaker enjoyed studying with her/his classmates.

 

 

 

 

ГоворящийABCDEF
Утверждение

2.

Вы услышите диалог. Определите, какие из приведённых утверждений А–G соответствуют содержанию текста (1 – True), какие не соответствуют (2 – False) и о чём в тексте не сказано, то есть на основании текста нельзя дать ни положительного, ни отрицательного ответа (3 – Not stated). Занесите номер выбранного Вами варианта ответа в таблицу. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

A) David hasn't been to school for some time.

B) Paula knew David felt much better.

C) Doctors think David needs a month to recover.

D) David has to read 78 pages from the history book.

E) David thinks the essay task is very hard.

F) Paula will e-mail the article for the biology task to David.

G) Paula agreed to visit David the next day.

 

Запишите в ответ цифры, расположив их в порядке, соответствующем буквам:

ABCDEFG
       

3.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The TV programme is designed to feature

 

1) actors pretending to be ordinary people.

2) people who vote for themselves to win a prize.

3) real people preparing dinner parties in their own homes.

4.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The funniest part of the program is generally the

 

1) kitchen scenes of preparation and cooking.

2) contestants trying to impress each other.

3) host selecting ingredients.

5.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The narrator believes that people are fascinated by other peoples’ homes

 

1) since everybody likes to show off their homes.

2) but doesn’t know why.

3) because decor and layout are fascinating.

6.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Each of the guests

 

1) gives the host a mark out of 10.

2) privately complains about the host.

3) publicly thanks the host.

7.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Some of the shows contestants

 

1) leave the show on a Friday.

2) become real TV stars.

3) become minor celebrities.

8.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The celebrity version of the show works well because

 

1) much is already known about the contestants.

2) the prizes go to charity.

3) celebrities often hate each other.

9.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The narrator might apply for the show because

 

1) he’d serve fish that he caught.

2) it would probably be good fun.

3) in reality he’s a professional chef.

10.

Уста­но­ви­те со­от­вет­ствие между за­го­лов­ка­ми 1–8 и тек­ста­ми A–G. За­пи­ши­те свои от­ве­ты в таб­ли­цу. Ис­поль­зуй­те каж­дую цифру толь­ко один раз. В за­да­нии есть один лиш­ний за­го­ло­вок.

 

1. Training the mind

2. Welsh roots

3. Quick reaction

4. Chemistry in tennis

5. Too fast

6. Losing control

7. Unexpected prize

8. Ads with wings

 

A. By now Wimbledon has become a popular national festival, together with Ascot and the Cup Final. Many people in Britain don’t know that tennis was first played in Wales. It was there, in 1873, that Major Walter Wingfield played a game with the recently invented rubber balls and enjoyed it so much, that he decided to develop the standards of the game. He published the first book of tennis rules later that year. The first Wimbledon championship was held a few years later in 1877 and the British Lawn Tennis Association formed in 1888.

 

B. Good mental preparation is necessary for professional tennis players. In a long match they can be on the court for several hours with nobody to talk to. There can be hundreds of stops from the crowd, their opponent and, especially at Wimbledon, the rain. Players need to practice methods for improving their concentration and for motivating themselves when the game is going against them. They are often taught to imagine some situations, such as a tense tie-break. Then they imagine what to do with it.

 

C. Many players find it impossible to stay calm in the stressful situation of a long tennis match and let their temper out. John McEnroe was famous for his quarrels with referees. Several players have been given warnings for throwing the racket or swearing. Some players lose matches they could easily win because their mind lets them down. Pat Rafter said that he couldn’t breathe in his 2000 Wimbledon final. The stress of being near the victory can be too much for a person.

 

D. The power of today’s tennis game is only partly created by the athletes themselves. Much of it comes from their rackets. New designs mean players can hit the ball with more speed and accuracy than ever before. It started in the 1970s when the traditional wooden racket was replaced with metal. Since then different materials have been used. Graphite has made the biggest influence. Now the graphite can be mixed with materials such as boron and titanium to produce even stronger, and lighter, rackets.

 

E. Speed isn’t always a good thing. Many fans are complaining that the speed of the game is making tennis boring to watch. After two years of testing, a new ball has now been invented which could slow down tennis and make it more exciting to watch. The ball is put together in exactly the same way as the one used now, but is 6% larger in diameter. The bigger ball gives the receiver 10% more reaction time in which to return the serve. So the number of aces — serves in a match that the receiver fails to return — will be far fewer.

 

F. When Irishman John Boland travelled to Athens for the first modern Olympic Games in 1896, he had no idea he would return home with the gold medal in tennis. But then, he had no idea he would compete either — he went to watch the competion. In comparison, today’s Olympic tennis players include some of the best athletes in the world. They are used to five-star hotels and hundreds of thousands of dollars, but at the Olympic Games they will stay in the Olympic Village and compete for nothing but a gold medal.

 

G. The Wimbledon tennis tournament is famous for pigeons that sometimes come flying on to Centre Court and stop the game. So, producers of a video tennis game designed for PlayStation2 decided to use specially trained homing pigeons, decorated with the game’s logo. Twenty birds will be spray-painted with the Virtual Tennis logo and trained to fly in and out of the home of British tennis during the matches of the Wimbledon championship. The advertising pigeons will go straight for the fans and show their logos to them.

 

ТекстABCDEFG
За­го­ло­вок

11.

Прочитайте текст и заполните пропуски A–F частями предложений, обозначенными цифрами 1–7. Одна из частей в списке 1–7 — лишняя. Занесите цифры, обозначающие соответствующие части предложений, в таблицу.

 

US Congress

 

The Congress of the United States of America is an important part of the US federal government.

It is an assembly of elected representatives A ___________________ but not to select the chief executive of the nation; that individual is elected by the people.

Congress is not a single organization; it is a vast and complex collection of organizations B ___________________ and through which members of Congress form alliances.

C ___________________, in which political parties are the only important

kind of organization, parties are only one of many important units in Congress.

In fact other organizations have grown in number D ___________________.

The Democrats and Republicans in the House and the Senate are organized by party leaders, E __________________ within the House and Senate. The party structure is essentially the same in the House as in the Senate, though the titles of various posts are different.

But leadership carries more power in the House than in the Senate because of the House rules. F ___________________, the House must restrict debate and schedule its business with great care; thus leaders who do the scheduling and who determine how the rules shall be applied usually have substantial influence.

 

1. as party influence has declined

2. against the spirit of the Constitution

3. being so large (435 members)

4. empowered to make laws

5. unlike the British Parliament

6. by which the business of Congress is carried on

7. who in turn are elected by the full party membership

 

ПропускABCDEF
Часть предложения

12.

Why is the collage of photographs more important for Kathy than the other wedding presents?

 

1) It reminds Kathy of her wedding.

2) Kathy didn’t like the other wedding presents.

3) It was the most expensive present.

4) Kathy’s sister made it for her.


Sisters

‘Dear Kathy! Chance made us sisters, hearts made us friends.’ This quote is at the center of a collage of photographs — covering our twenty-something years — that now hangs in my office. My sister, Susie, made it for me as a wedding present. It probably cost very little to make (she is a starving college student, after all), but it means more to me than any of the more ‘traditional’ wedding presents my husband and I received from family and friends last June. Whenever I look at the collage, it reminds me of my sister and what a true friend she is.

 

Susie and I weren’t always close friends. Far from it, in fact. We shared a room for nearly fifteen years when we were younger, and at the time I thought I couldn’t have asked for a worse roommate. She was always around! If we argued and I wanted to go to my room to be alone, she’d follow me right in. If I told her to go away, she’d say right back, ‘It’s my room, too! And I can be here if I want to.’ I’d consult my mother and she usually agreed with Susie. I suppose being three years younger has its benefits.

 

When we were kids, she’d ‘borrow’ my dolls without asking. (And no toy was safe in her hands.) When we got older, Susie quit borrowing my toys and started borrowing my clothes. That was the final straw. I couldn’t take it anymore. I begged my parents to let me have a room of my own — preferably one with a lock on the door. The answer was always a resounding ‘no.’ ‘Please?!’ I’d beg. My parents would just shake their heads. They didn’t agree with each other on much, but for some reason they had a united front on this issue.

 

To crown it all, she had this habit of doing everything I did. Choirs, rock bands, sports teams, dance studios: There was no place where I was safe. ‘She looks up to you,’ my mom would say. I didn’t care. I just wanted a piece of my life that didn’t involve my little sister. When I complained to my mother, she’d just smile and say, ‘One day you’ll want her around.’ Sure.

 

It’s strange how mothers have this habit of being right about everything. When I was sixteen and my sister was thirteen, we went through a series of life-chang- ing events together that would forever change our relationship. First, my parents announced that they were divorcing. My dad packed up and moved to an apartment in New Hampshire — more than a half hour drive away from our cozy house in Massachusetts. He bought me my first car and I often went with Susie to his place when we missed him a lot. During those trips we started discussing our troubles and making plans about how to reunite the family again. But a year later, our father met his future second wife and moved again; this time to Indiana. This meant we could only see him once or twice a year, as opposed to once every few weeks. That was hard.

 

Yet those few months changed my relationship with my sister forever. We started having more heart-to-heart talks as opposed to silly fights. Over time, she became my most cherished friend. It’s not uncommon for us to have three-hour-long telephone conversations about everything or about nothing—just laughing over memories from childhood or high school.

 

She’s the only person who’s been through all of the tough stuff that I’ve been through, and the only person who truly understands me. Susie and I have shared so much. She’s been my roommate, my friend, and my partner in crime. We’ve done plays together, gone to amusement parks, sang, and taken long road trips together. We’ve laughed until our sides hurt, and wiped away each others’ tears.

 

Even though distance separates us now, we’re closer than ever. Sisters share a special bond. They’ve seen all of your most embarrassing moments. They know your deepest, darkest secrets. Most importantly, they love you unconditionally. I’m lucky to be able to say that my little sister is my best friend. I only wish everyone could be so fortunate.

13.

Why was Kathy against sharing a room with her sister?

 

1) They always quarreled.

2) Susie never left her alone.

3) They were of different age.

4) Susie said it was her own room.


Sisters

‘Dear Kathy! Chance made us sisters, hearts made us friends.’ This quote is at the center of a collage of photographs — covering our twenty-something years — that now hangs in my office. My sister, Susie, made it for me as a wedding present. It probably cost very little to make (she is a starving college student, after all), but it means more to me than any of the more ‘traditional’ wedding presents my husband and I received from family and friends last June. Whenever I look at the collage, it reminds me of my sister and what a true friend she is.

 

Susie and I weren’t always close friends. Far from it, in fact. We shared a room for nearly fifteen years when we were younger, and at the time I thought I couldn’t have asked for a worse roommate. She was always around! If we argued and I wanted to go to my room to be alone, she’d follow me right in. If I told her to go away, she’d say right back, ‘It’s my room, too! And I can be here if I want to.’ I’d consult my mother and she usually agreed with Susie. I suppose being three years younger has its benefits.

 

When we were kids, she’d ‘borrow’ my dolls without asking. (And no toy was safe in her hands.) When we got older, Susie quit borrowing my toys and started borrowing my clothes. That was the final straw. I couldn’t take it anymore. I begged my parents to let me have a room of my own — preferably one with a lock on the door. The answer was always a resounding ‘no.’ ‘Please?!’ I’d beg. My parents would just shake their heads. They didn’t agree with each other on much, but for some reason they had a united front on this issue.

 

To crown it all, she had this habit of doing everything I did. Choirs, rock bands, sports teams, dance studios: There was no place where I was safe. ‘She looks up to you,’ my mom would say. I didn’t care. I just wanted a piece of my life that didn’t involve my little sister. When I complained to my mother, she’d just smile and say, ‘One day you’ll want her around.’ Sure.

 

It’s strange how mothers have this habit of being right about everything. When I was sixteen and my sister was thirteen, we went through a series of life-chang- ing events together that would forever change our relationship. First, my parents announced that they were divorcing. My dad packed up and moved to an apartment in New Hampshire — more than a half hour drive away from our cozy house in Massachusetts. He bought me my first car and I often went with Susie to his place when we missed him a lot. During those trips we started discussing our troubles and making plans about how to reunite the family again. But a year later, our father met his future second wife and moved again; this time to Indiana. This meant we could only see him once or twice a year, as opposed to once every few weeks. That was hard.

 

Yet those few months changed my relationship with my sister forever. We started having more heart-to-heart talks as opposed to silly fights. Over time, she became my most cherished friend. It’s not uncommon for us to have three-hour-long telephone conversations about everything or about nothing—just laughing over memories from childhood or high school.

 

She’s the only person who’s been through all of the tough stuff that I’ve been through, and the only person who truly understands me. Susie and I have shared so much. She’s been my roommate, my friend, and my partner in crime. We’ve done plays together, gone to amusement parks, sang, and taken long road trips together. We’ve laughed until our sides hurt, and wiped away each others’ tears.

 

Even though distance separates us now, we’re closer than ever. Sisters share a special bond. They’ve seen all of your most embarrassing moments. They know your deepest, darkest secrets. Most importantly, they love you unconditionally. I’m lucky to be able to say that my little sister is my best friend. I only wish everyone could be so fortunate.

14.

What did Kathy call the final straw in paragraph 3?

 

1) The fact that Susie often borrowed Kathy’s toys.

2) The fact that Susie never asked for the things she borrowed.

3) The fact that Susie began to wear Kathy’s clothes without her permission.

4) The fact that Susie broke all the toys she played with.


Sisters

‘Dear Kathy! Chance made us sisters, hearts made us friends.’ This quote is at the center of a collage of photographs — covering our twenty-something years — that now hangs in my office. My sister, Susie, made it for me as a wedding present. It probably cost very little to make (she is a starving college student, after all), but it means more to me than any of the more ‘traditional’ wedding presents my husband and I received from family and friends last June. Whenever I look at the collage, it reminds me of my sister and what a true friend she is.

 

Susie and I weren’t always close friends. Far from it, in fact. We shared a room for nearly fifteen years when we were younger, and at the time I thought I couldn’t have asked for a worse roommate. She was always around! If we argued and I wanted to go to my room to be alone, she’d follow me right in. If I told her to go away, she’d say right back, ‘It’s my room, too! And I can be here if I want to.’ I’d consult my mother and she usually agreed with Susie. I suppose being three years younger has its benefits.

 

When we were kids, she’d ‘borrow’ my dolls without asking. (And no toy was safe in her hands.) When we got older, Susie quit borrowing my toys and started borrowing my clothes. That was the final straw. I couldn’t take it anymore. I begged my parents to let me have a room of my own — preferably one with a lock on the door. The answer was always a resounding ‘no.’ ‘Please?!’ I’d beg. My parents would just shake their heads. They didn’t agree with each other on much, but for some reason they had a united front on this issue.

 

To crown it all, she had this habit of doing everything I did. Choirs, rock bands, sports teams, dance studios: There was no place where I was safe. ‘She looks up to you,’ my mom would say. I didn’t care. I just wanted a piece of my life that didn’t involve my little sister. When I complained to my mother, she’d just smile and say, ‘One day you’ll want her around.’ Sure.

 

It’s strange how mothers have this habit of being right about everything. When I was sixteen and my sister was thirteen, we went through a series of life-chang- ing events together that would forever change our relationship. First, my parents announced that they were divorcing. My dad packed up and moved to an apartment in New Hampshire — more than a half hour drive away from our cozy house in Massachusetts. He bought me my first car and I often went with Susie to his place when we missed him a lot. During those trips we started discussing our troubles and making plans about how to reunite the family again. But a year later, our father met his future second wife and moved again; this time to Indiana. This meant we could only see him once or twice a year, as opposed to once every few weeks. That was hard.

 

Yet those few months changed my relationship with my sister forever. We started having more heart-to-heart talks as opposed to silly fights. Over time, she became my most cherished friend. It’s not uncommon for us to have three-hour-long telephone conversations about everything or about nothing—just laughing over memories from childhood or high school.

 

She’s the only person who’s been through all of the tough stuff that I’ve been through, and the only person who truly understands me. Susie and I have shared so much. She’s been my roommate, my friend, and my partner in crime. We’ve done plays together, gone to amusement parks, sang, and taken long road trips together. We’ve laughed until our sides hurt, and wiped away each others’ tears.

 

Even though distance separates us now, we’re closer than ever. Sisters share a special bond. They’ve seen all of your most embarrassing moments. They know your deepest, darkest secrets. Most importantly, they love you unconditionally. I’m lucky to be able to say that my little sister is my best friend. I only wish everyone could be so fortunate.

15.

What was Kathy’s greatest wish that she mentioned in paragraph 4?

 

1) To have a separate life from her sister.

2) To live in peace and safety.

3) To never part with her sister.

4) To have the same hobbies as her sister


Sisters

‘Dear Kathy! Chance made us sisters, hearts made us friends.’ This quote is at the center of a collage of photographs — covering our twenty-something years — that now hangs in my office. My sister, Susie, made it for me as a wedding present. It probably cost very little to make (she is a starving college student, after all), but it means more to me than any of the more ‘traditional’ wedding presents my husband and I received from family and friends last June. Whenever I look at the collage, it reminds me of my sister and what a true friend she is.

 

Susie and I weren’t always close friends. Far from it, in fact. We shared a room for nearly fifteen years when we were younger, and at the time I thought I couldn’t have asked for a worse roommate. She was always around! If we argued and I wanted to go to my room to be alone, she’d follow me right in. If I told her to go away, she’d say right back, ‘It’s my room, too! And I can be here if I want to.’ I’d consult my mother and she usually agreed with Susie. I suppose being three years younger has its benefits.

 

When we were kids, she’d ‘borrow’ my dolls without asking. (And no toy was safe in her hands.) When we got older, Susie quit borrowing my toys and started borrowing my clothes. That was the final straw. I couldn’t take it anymore. I begged my parents to let me have a room of my own — preferably one with a lock on the door. The answer was always a resounding ‘no.’ ‘Please?!’ I’d beg. My parents would just shake their heads. They didn’t agree with each other on much, but for some reason they had a united front on this issue.

 

To crown it all, she had this habit of doing everything I did. Choirs, rock bands, sports teams, dance studios: There was no place where I was safe. ‘She looks up to you,’ my mom would say. I didn’t care. I just wanted a piece of my life that didn’t involve my little sister. When I complained to my mother, she’d just smile and say, ‘One day you’ll want her around.’ Sure.

 

It’s strange how mothers have this habit of being right about everything. When I was sixteen and my sister was thirteen, we went through a series of life-chang- ing events together that would forever change our relationship. First, my parents announced that they were divorcing. My dad packed up and moved to an apartment in New Hampshire — more than a half hour drive away from our cozy house in Massachusetts. He bought me my first car and I often went with Susie to his place when we missed him a lot. During those trips we started discussing our troubles and making plans about how to reunite the family again. But a year later, our father met his future second wife and moved again; this time to Indiana. This meant we could only see him once or twice a year, as opposed to once every few weeks. That was hard.

 

Yet those few months changed my relationship with my sister forever. We started having more heart-to-heart talks as opposed to silly fights. Over time, she became my most cherished friend. It’s not uncommon for us to have three-hour-long telephone conversations about everything or about nothing—just laughing over memories from childhood or high school.

 

She’s the only person who’s been through all of the tough stuff that I’ve been through, and the only person who truly understands me. Susie and I have shared so much. She’s been my roommate, my friend, and my partner in crime. We’ve done plays together, gone to amusement parks, sang, and taken long road trips together. We’ve laughed until our sides hurt, and wiped away each others’ tears.

 

Even though distance separates us now, we’re closer than ever. Sisters share a special bond. They’ve seen all of your most embarrassing moments. They know your deepest, darkest secrets. Most importantly, they love you unconditionally. I’m lucky to be able to say that my little sister is my best friend. I only wish everyone could be so fortunate.

16.

When did the relationship between Susie and Kathy start to change?

 

1) When they moved to a pew house.

2) Aiter their father married the second time.

3) After their parents divorced.

4) When Kathy’s father bought her a car.


Sisters

‘Dear Kathy! Chance made us sisters, hearts made us friends.’ This quote is at the center of a collage of photographs — covering our twenty-something years — that now hangs in my office. My sister, Susie, made it for me as a wedding present. It probably cost very little to make (she is a starving college student, after all), but it means more to me than any of the more ‘traditional’ wedding presents my husband and I received from family and friends last June. Whenever I look at the collage, it reminds me of my sister and what a true friend she is.

 

Susie and I weren’t always close friends. Far from it, in fact. We shared a room for nearly fifteen years when we were younger, and at the time I thought I couldn’t have asked for a worse roommate. She was always around! If we argued and I wanted to go to my room to be alone, she’d follow me right in. If I told her to go away, she’d say right back, ‘It’s my room, too! And I can be here if I want to.’ I’d consult my mother and she usually agreed with Susie. I suppose being three years younger has its benefits.

 

When we were kids, she’d ‘borrow’ my dolls without asking. (And no toy was safe in her hands.) When we got older, Susie quit borrowing my toys and started borrowing my clothes. That was the final straw. I couldn’t take it anymore. I begged my parents to let me have a room of my own — preferably one with a lock on the door. The answer was always a resounding ‘no.’ ‘Please?!’ I’d beg. My parents would just shake their heads. They didn’t agree with each other on much, but for some reason they had a united front on this issue.

 

To crown it all, she had this habit of doing everything I did. Choirs, rock bands, sports teams, dance studios: There was no place where I was safe. ‘She looks up to you,’ my mom would say. I didn’t care. I just wanted a piece of my life that didn’t involve my little sister. When I complained to my mother, she’d just smile and say, ‘One day you’ll want her around.’ Sure.

 

It’s strange how mothers have this habit of being right about everything. When I was sixteen and my sister was thirteen, we went through a series of life-chang- ing events together that would forever change our relationship. First, my parents announced that they were divorcing. My dad packed up and moved to an apartment in New Hampshire — more than a half hour drive away from our cozy house in Massachusetts. He bought me my first car and I often went with Susie to his place when we missed him a lot. During those trips we started discussing our troubles and making plans about how to reunite the family again. But a year later, our father met his future second wife and moved again; this time to Indiana. This meant we could only see him once or twice a year, as opposed to once every few weeks. That was hard.

 

Yet those few months changed my relationship with my sister forever. We started having more heart-to-heart talks as opposed to silly fights. Over time, she became my most cherished friend. It’s not uncommon for us to have three-hour-long telephone conversations about everything or about nothing—just laughing over memories from childhood or high school.

 

She’s the only person who’s been through all of the tough stuff that I’ve been through, and the only person who truly understands me. Susie and I have shared so much. She’s been my roommate, my friend, and my partner in crime. We’ve done plays together, gone to amusement parks, sang, and taken long road trips together. We’ve laughed until our sides hurt, and wiped away each others’ tears.

 

Even though distance separates us now, we’re closer than ever. Sisters share a special bond. They’ve seen all of your most embarrassing moments. They know your deepest, darkest secrets. Most importantly, they love you unconditionally. I’m lucky to be able to say that my little sister is my best friend. I only wish everyone could be so fortunate.

17.

What are Kathy’s relationships with Susie now?

 

1) They hate each other.

2) They are close friends.

3) They are business partners.

4) They do not see each other.


Sisters

‘Dear Kathy! Chance made us sisters, hearts made us friends.’ This quote is at the center of a collage of photographs — covering our twenty-something years — that now hangs in my office. My sister, Susie, made it for me as a wedding present. It probably cost very little to make (she is a starving college student, after all), but it means more to me than any of the more ‘traditional’ wedding presents my husband and I received from family and friends last June. Whenever I look at the collage, it reminds me of my sister and what a true friend she is.

 

Susie and I weren’t always close friends. Far from it, in fact. We shared a room for nearly fifteen years when we were younger, and at the time I thought I couldn’t have asked for a worse roommate. She was always around! If we argued and I wanted to go to my room to be alone, she’d follow me right in. If I told her to go away, she’d say right back, ‘It’s my room, too! And I can be here if I want to.’ I’d consult my mother and she usually agreed with Susie. I suppose being three years younger has its benefits.

 

When we were kids, she’d ‘borrow’ my dolls without asking. (And no toy was safe in her hands.) When we got older, Susie quit borrowing my toys and started borrowing my clothes. That was the final straw. I couldn’t take it anymore. I begged my parents to let me have a room of my own — preferably one with a lock on the door. The answer was always a resounding ‘no.’ ‘Please?!’ I’d beg. My parents would just shake their heads. They didn’t agree with each other on much, but for some reason they had a united front on this issue.

 

To crown it all, she had this habit of doing everything I did. Choirs, rock bands, sports teams, dance studios: There was no place where I was safe. ‘She looks up to you,’ my mom would say. I didn’t care. I just wanted a piece of my life that didn’t involve my little sister. When I complained to my mother, she’d just smile and say, ‘One day you’ll want her around.’ Sure.

 

It’s strange how mothers have this habit of being right about everything. When I was sixteen and my sister was thirteen, we went through a series of life-chang- ing events together that would forever change our relationship. First, my parents announced that they were divorcing. My dad packed up and moved to an apartment in New Hampshire — more than a half hour drive away from our cozy house in Massachusetts. He bought me my first car and I often went with Susie to his place when we missed him a lot. During those trips we started discussing our troubles and making plans about how to reunite the family again. But a year later, our father met his future second wife and moved again; this time to Indiana. This meant we could only see him once or twice a year, as opposed to once every few weeks. That was hard.

 

Yet those few months changed my relationship with my sister forever. We started having more heart-to-heart talks as opposed to silly fights. Over time, she became my most cherished friend. It’s not uncommon for us to have three-hour-long telephone conversations about everything or about nothing—just laughing over memories from childhood or high school.

 

She’s the only person who’s been through all of the tough stuff that I’ve been through, and the only person who truly understands me. Susie and I have shared so much. She’s been my roommate, my friend, and my partner in crime. We’ve done plays together, gone to amusement parks, sang, and taken long road trips together. We’ve laughed until our sides hurt, and wiped away each others’ tears.

 

Even though distance separates us now, we’re closer than ever. Sisters share a special bond. They’ve seen all of your most embarrassing moments. They know your deepest, darkest secrets. Most importantly, they love you unconditionally. I’m lucky to be able to say that my little sister is my best friend. I only wish everyone could be so fortunate.

18.

Why do the sisters understand each other?

 

1) They have got the same hobbies.

2) They have similar sense of humour.

3) They love each other very much.

4) They have similar life experience.


Sisters

‘Dear Kathy! Chance made us sisters, hearts made us friends.’ This quote is at the center of a collage of photographs — covering our twenty-something years — that now hangs in my office. My sister, Susie, made it for me as a wedding present. It probably cost very little to make (she is a starving college student, after all), but it means more to me than any of the more ‘traditional’ wedding presents my husband and I received from family and friends last June. Whenever I look at the collage, it reminds me of my sister and what a true friend she is.

 

Susie and I weren’t always close friends. Far from it, in fact. We shared a room for nearly fifteen years when we were younger, and at the time I thought I couldn’t have asked for a worse roommate. She was always around! If we argued and I wanted to go to my room to be alone, she’d follow me right in. If I told her to go away, she’d say right back, ‘It’s my room, too! And I can be here if I want to.’ I’d consult my mother and she usually agreed with Susie. I suppose being three years younger has its benefits.

 

When we were kids, she’d ‘borrow’ my dolls without asking. (And no toy was safe in her hands.) When we got older, Susie quit borrowing my toys and started borrowing my clothes. That was the final straw. I couldn’t take it anymore. I begged my parents to let me have a room of my own — preferably one with a lock on the door. The answer was always a resounding ‘no.’ ‘Please?!’ I’d beg. My parents would just shake their heads. They didn’t agree with each other on much, but for some reason they had a united front on this issue.

 

To crown it all, she had this habit of doing everything I did. Choirs, rock bands, sports teams, dance studios: There was no place where I was safe. ‘She looks up to you,’ my mom would say. I didn’t care. I just wanted a piece of my life that didn’t involve my little sister. When I complained to my mother, she’d just smile and say, ‘One day you’ll want her around.’ Sure.

 

It’s strange how mothers have this habit of being right about everything. When I was sixteen and my sister was thirteen, we went through a series of life-chang- ing events together that would forever change our relationship. First, my parents announced that they were divorcing. My dad packed up and moved to an apartment in New Hampshire — more than a half hour drive away from our cozy house in Massachusetts. He bought me my first car and I often went with Susie to his place when we missed him a lot. During those trips we started discussing our troubles and making plans about how to reunite the family again. But a year later, our father met his future second wife and moved again; this time to Indiana. This meant we could only see him once or twice a year, as opposed to once every few weeks. That was hard.

 

Yet those few months changed my relationship with my sister forever. We started having more heart-to-heart talks as opposed to silly fights. Over time, she became my most cherished friend. It’s not uncommon for us to have three-hour-long telephone conversations about everything or about nothing—just laughing over memories from childhood or high school.

 

She’s the only person who’s been through all of the tough stuff that I’ve been through, and the only person who truly understands me. Susie and I have shared so much. She’s been my roommate, my friend, and my partner in crime. We’ve done plays together, gone to amusement parks, sang, and taken long road trips together. We’ve laughed until our sides hurt, and wiped away each others’ tears.

 

Even though distance separates us now, we’re closer than ever. Sisters share a special bond. They’ve seen all of your most embarrassing moments. They know your deepest, darkest secrets. Most importantly, they love you unconditionally. I’m lucky to be able to say that my little sister is my best friend. I only wish everyone could be so fortunate.

19.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово MAKE так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

 

A Picnic Spot

 

‘It’s a perfect day for a picnic’, said Mr. Wolf. ‘Do you think you could pack us a lunch?’

‘I certainly could’, said Mrs. Wolf. So the decision ______ .

20.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово CAN NOT так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

But once she and Mr. Wolf and their son and daughter were out in the summer woods, they ______ find the right spot.

21.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово THREE так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

One picnic spot was too shady, another was too sunny and hot. The ______ had no wild flowers around it.

22.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово GOOD так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

And when at last they found one with all those things, Mrs. Wolf cried, ‘Oh, but here there’s no water. Surely we can find a ______ spot than this one.’

23.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово CHILD так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

When it was lunchtime, everyone was very hungry. At last the ______ cried:

‘Please hurry up and choose a picnic place.’

‘Yes, please, do.’ Mr. Wolf said. ‘This basket is so heavy.’

24.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово WE так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

‘All right,’ agreed Mrs. Wolf. ‘Let_______ just go round the next turn in the path — and there we will eat.’

25.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово LOOK так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

So they went around the turn and soon came into their own back yard! Mr. Wolf quickly put down his basket. ‘It’s a perfect spot for a picnic,’ he said ______ around with a smile.

‘Chairs, and a table, and a pool — and a beautiful flower garden!’ And they decided to have picnics there all summer long.

26.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова MOVE од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

 

Migrating Birds

 

In autumn you can see large flocks of birds flying from Russia to warmer countries. In spring, they come back to us. Migration is the periodic seasonal ______ of birds.

27.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова SCIENCE од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

The main routes connect Europe and Africa, Europe and South-Eastern Asia and Australia, North and South America. How do we know about these routes? ______ study birds. They catch birds, place small bands with numbers on the birds’ legs and then let the birds fly away. Some of these banded birds are caught again. The band tells about the route.

28.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова QUICK од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Some birds fly very ______ and they can feed on the wing. They migrate in the daytime.

29.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова DARK од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Swallows and swifts do this. Cuckoos fly during the night and rest and feed during the day. Swimming birds can fly both during the day and night, in complete ______ .

30.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова POWER од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

How long can birds fly for without a stop? The tiny hummingbird weighs only about as much as a small coin. But it has ______ wings.

31.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова POSSIBLE од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

It flies 1,000 km across the Gulf of Mexico to the southern coast of the United States in 24 hours without a stop! You may think it's ______ , but other small birds can fly non-stop for up to 90 hours!

32.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) meeting

2) greeting

3) keeping

4) holding


Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32–38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32 – 38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Укажите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа.

 

Kent 1926

Uncle Will arrived at Kent at 5 p.m. ”What’s wrong with your father, Bess? Will asked after 32 ______ her with an affectionate embrace. Bess was his favorite niece and he came as quickly as he could after her call. She sounded desperate. Stepping back, Will peered into her face. It was pale and filled with 33 ______.

“What happened?” Uncle Will placed his hand on Bessy’s.

“Pa took my brothers fishing at Ravenscar last weekend and 34 ______ a cold then. It was chilly out on the North Sea, and very windy, and it poured with rain, they got drenched. His cold 35 ______ into bronchitis, as it often does with him. I think it’s a family weakness, a weak chest, I mean. His face is white and he is feverish. I have never seen Pa look as ill as this. That’s why I telephoned you.”

“I am glad you did, and I’m certainly glad I decided to come down to Kent last night”.

As they walked across the entrance foyer of Waverley Court, heading toward the staircase, Bess went 36 ______, “I think you know that my mother went to Rome for Easter. Her former college mate invited her. She took Cecily and the two boys with her. The boys were so happy. I didn’t want to go with them, and now I’m relieved I stayed here, so that I can look 37 ______ my father”.

”I’m assuming you’ve telephoned the doctor?”

“Yes, he will be here very soon. It’s Dr. Earnest Lessing. He is the local doctor we use when we are residing in Kent. Meanwhile Faxton and I have been 38 ______ Father the best we can. He’s been inhaling Frier’s Balsam and taking his cough mixture. I do think that’s helped.” At this moment the door opened and Dr. Lessing came in.

33.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) depression

2) stress

3) trouble

4) worry


Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32–38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32 – 38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Укажите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа.

 

Kent 1926

Uncle Will arrived at Kent at 5 p.m. ”What’s wrong with your father, Bess? Will asked after 32 ______ her with an affectionate embrace. Bess was his favorite niece and he came as quickly as he could after her call. She sounded desperate. Stepping back, Will peered into her face. It was pale and filled with 33 ______.

“What happened?” Uncle Will placed his hand on Bessy’s.

“Pa took my brothers fishing at Ravenscar last weekend and 34 ______ a cold then. It was chilly out on the North Sea, and very windy, and it poured with rain, they got drenched. His cold 35 ______ into bronchitis, as it often does with him. I think it’s a family weakness, a weak chest, I mean. His face is white and he is feverish. I have never seen Pa look as ill as this. That’s why I telephoned you.”

“I am glad you did, and I’m certainly glad I decided to come down to Kent last night”.

As they walked across the entrance foyer of Waverley Court, heading toward the staircase, Bess went 36 ______, “I think you know that my mother went to Rome for Easter. Her former college mate invited her. She took Cecily and the two boys with her. The boys were so happy. I didn’t want to go with them, and now I’m relieved I stayed here, so that I can look 37 ______ my father”.

”I’m assuming you’ve telephoned the doctor?”

“Yes, he will be here very soon. It’s Dr. Earnest Lessing. He is the local doctor we use when we are residing in Kent. Meanwhile Faxton and I have been 38 ______ Father the best we can. He’s been inhaling Frier’s Balsam and taking his cough mixture. I do think that’s helped.” At this moment the door opened and Dr. Lessing came in.

34.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) caught

2) had

3) received

4) appeared


Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32–38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32 – 38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Укажите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа.

 

Kent 1926

Uncle Will arrived at Kent at 5 p.m. ”What’s wrong with your father, Bess? Will asked after 32 ______ her with an affectionate embrace. Bess was his favorite niece and he came as quickly as he could after her call. She sounded desperate. Stepping back, Will peered into her face. It was pale and filled with 33 ______.

“What happened?” Uncle Will placed his hand on Bessy’s.

“Pa took my brothers fishing at Ravenscar last weekend and 34 ______ a cold then. It was chilly out on the North Sea, and very windy, and it poured with rain, they got drenched. His cold 35 ______ into bronchitis, as it often does with him. I think it’s a family weakness, a weak chest, I mean. His face is white and he is feverish. I have never seen Pa look as ill as this. That’s why I telephoned you.”

“I am glad you did, and I’m certainly glad I decided to come down to Kent last night”.

As they walked across the entrance foyer of Waverley Court, heading toward the staircase, Bess went 36 ______, “I think you know that my mother went to Rome for Easter. Her former college mate invited her. She took Cecily and the two boys with her. The boys were so happy. I didn’t want to go with them, and now I’m relieved I stayed here, so that I can look 37 ______ my father”.

”I’m assuming you’ve telephoned the doctor?”

“Yes, he will be here very soon. It’s Dr. Earnest Lessing. He is the local doctor we use when we are residing in Kent. Meanwhile Faxton and I have been 38 ______ Father the best we can. He’s been inhaling Frier’s Balsam and taking his cough mixture. I do think that’s helped.” At this moment the door opened and Dr. Lessing came in.

35.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) turned

2) seemed

3) appeared

4) was


Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32–38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32 – 38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Укажите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа.

 

Kent 1926

Uncle Will arrived at Kent at 5 p.m. ”What’s wrong with your father, Bess? Will asked after 32 ______ her with an affectionate embrace. Bess was his favorite niece and he came as quickly as he could after her call. She sounded desperate. Stepping back, Will peered into her face. It was pale and filled with 33 ______.

“What happened?” Uncle Will placed his hand on Bessy’s.

“Pa took my brothers fishing at Ravenscar last weekend and 34 ______ a cold then. It was chilly out on the North Sea, and very windy, and it poured with rain, they got drenched. His cold 35 ______ into bronchitis, as it often does with him. I think it’s a family weakness, a weak chest, I mean. His face is white and he is feverish. I have never seen Pa look as ill as this. That’s why I telephoned you.”

“I am glad you did, and I’m certainly glad I decided to come down to Kent last night”.

As they walked across the entrance foyer of Waverley Court, heading toward the staircase, Bess went 36 ______, “I think you know that my mother went to Rome for Easter. Her former college mate invited her. She took Cecily and the two boys with her. The boys were so happy. I didn’t want to go with them, and now I’m relieved I stayed here, so that I can look 37 ______ my father”.

”I’m assuming you’ve telephoned the doctor?”

“Yes, he will be here very soon. It’s Dr. Earnest Lessing. He is the local doctor we use when we are residing in Kent. Meanwhile Faxton and I have been 38 ______ Father the best we can. He’s been inhaling Frier’s Balsam and taking his cough mixture. I do think that’s helped.” At this moment the door opened and Dr. Lessing came in.

36.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) out

2) up

3) on

4) off


Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32–38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32 – 38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Укажите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа.

 

Kent 1926

Uncle Will arrived at Kent at 5 p.m. ”What’s wrong with your father, Bess? Will asked after 32 ______ her with an affectionate embrace. Bess was his favorite niece and he came as quickly as he could after her call. She sounded desperate. Stepping back, Will peered into her face. It was pale and filled with 33 ______.

“What happened?” Uncle Will placed his hand on Bessy’s.

“Pa took my brothers fishing at Ravenscar last weekend and 34 ______ a cold then. It was chilly out on the North Sea, and very windy, and it poured with rain, they got drenched. His cold 35 ______ into bronchitis, as it often does with him. I think it’s a family weakness, a weak chest, I mean. His face is white and he is feverish. I have never seen Pa look as ill as this. That’s why I telephoned you.”

“I am glad you did, and I’m certainly glad I decided to come down to Kent last night”.

As they walked across the entrance foyer of Waverley Court, heading toward the staircase, Bess went 36 ______, “I think you know that my mother went to Rome for Easter. Her former college mate invited her. She took Cecily and the two boys with her. The boys were so happy. I didn’t want to go with them, and now I’m relieved I stayed here, so that I can look 37 ______ my father”.

”I’m assuming you’ve telephoned the doctor?”

“Yes, he will be here very soon. It’s Dr. Earnest Lessing. He is the local doctor we use when we are residing in Kent. Meanwhile Faxton and I have been 38 ______ Father the best we can. He’s been inhaling Frier’s Balsam and taking his cough mixture. I do think that’s helped.” At this moment the door opened and Dr. Lessing came in.

37.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) up

2) for

3) after

4) at


Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32–38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32 – 38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Укажите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа.

 

Kent 1926

Uncle Will arrived at Kent at 5 p.m. ”What’s wrong with your father, Bess? Will asked after 32 ______ her with an affectionate embrace. Bess was his favorite niece and he came as quickly as he could after her call. She sounded desperate. Stepping back, Will peered into her face. It was pale and filled with 33 ______.

“What happened?” Uncle Will placed his hand on Bessy’s.

“Pa took my brothers fishing at Ravenscar last weekend and 34 ______ a cold then. It was chilly out on the North Sea, and very windy, and it poured with rain, they got drenched. His cold 35 ______ into bronchitis, as it often does with him. I think it’s a family weakness, a weak chest, I mean. His face is white and he is feverish. I have never seen Pa look as ill as this. That’s why I telephoned you.”

“I am glad you did, and I’m certainly glad I decided to come down to Kent last night”.

As they walked across the entrance foyer of Waverley Court, heading toward the staircase, Bess went 36 ______, “I think you know that my mother went to Rome for Easter. Her former college mate invited her. She took Cecily and the two boys with her. The boys were so happy. I didn’t want to go with them, and now I’m relieved I stayed here, so that I can look 37 ______ my father”.

”I’m assuming you’ve telephoned the doctor?”

“Yes, he will be here very soon. It’s Dr. Earnest Lessing. He is the local doctor we use when we are residing in Kent. Meanwhile Faxton and I have been 38 ______ Father the best we can. He’s been inhaling Frier’s Balsam and taking his cough mixture. I do think that’s helped.” At this moment the door opened and Dr. Lessing came in.

38.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) curing

2) treating

3) inhaling

4) prescribing


Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32–38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32 – 38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Укажите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа.

 

Kent 1926

Uncle Will arrived at Kent at 5 p.m. ”What’s wrong with your father, Bess? Will asked after 32 ______ her with an affectionate embrace. Bess was his favorite niece and he came as quickly as he could after her call. She sounded desperate. Stepping back, Will peered into her face. It was pale and filled with 33 ______.

“What happened?” Uncle Will placed his hand on Bessy’s.

“Pa took my brothers fishing at Ravenscar last weekend and 34 ______ a cold then. It was chilly out on the North Sea, and very windy, and it poured with rain, they got drenched. His cold 35 ______ into bronchitis, as it often does with him. I think it’s a family weakness, a weak chest, I mean. His face is white and he is feverish. I have never seen Pa look as ill as this. That’s why I telephoned you.”

“I am glad you did, and I’m certainly glad I decided to come down to Kent last night”.

As they walked across the entrance foyer of Waverley Court, heading toward the staircase, Bess went 36 ______, “I think you know that my mother went to Rome for Easter. Her former college mate invited her. She took Cecily and the two boys with her. The boys were so happy. I didn’t want to go with them, and now I’m relieved I stayed here, so that I can look 37 ______ my father”.

”I’m assuming you’ve telephoned the doctor?”

“Yes, he will be here very soon. It’s Dr. Earnest Lessing. He is the local doctor we use when we are residing in Kent. Meanwhile Faxton and I have been 38 ______ Father the best we can. He’s been inhaling Frier’s Balsam and taking his cough mixture. I do think that’s helped.” At this moment the door opened and Dr. Lessing came in.

39.

You have received a letter from your English-speaking pen-friend Richard who writes:

 

...I’m currently studying for my exams and hope to do well at my finals. I wish I could have more free time now as I love going out with my friends, meeting new people, making new acquaintances. Do you like hanging out with friends in your free time or are you a stay-at-home type? How do you usually spend the weekend? What are your hobbies or interests?

A friend of mine is coming to see me this weekend...

 

Write a letter to Richard. In your letter answer his questions, ask 3 questions about his friend’s visit. Write 100—140 words. Remember the rules of letter writing. You have 20 minutes to do this task.

40.

Вы­бе­ри­те толь­ко ОДНО из двух пред­ло­жен­ных вы­ска­зы­ва­ний и вы­ра­зи­те своё мне­ние по пред­ло­жен­ной про­бле­ме со­глас­но дан­но­му плану.

 

Comment on one of the following statements.

 

1. Some people think that young people should follow in their parents' footsteps when choosing a profession.

2. Teenagers should be allowed to read whatever books they like.

 

What is your opinion? Do you agree with this statement? Write 200–250 words. Use the following plan:

− make an introduction (state the problem)

− express your personal opinion and give 2–3 reasons for your opinion

− express an opposing opinion and give 1–2 reasons for this opposing opinion

− explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion

− make a conclusion restating your position

41.

Imagine that you are preparing a project with your friend. You have found some interesting material for the presentation and you want to read this text to your friend. You have 1.5 minutes to read the text silently, then be ready to read it out aloud. You will not have more than 1.5 minutes to read it.

 

Only seven prisoners were freed by the storming of the Bastille. In France, 14 July, Bastille Day, is a national holiday and a glorious national symbol. From the rousing paintings of the scene, you might think hundreds of proud revolutionaries flooded into the streets waving tricolours. In fact, only just over half a dozen people were being held at the time of the siege.

One hundred lives were lost in the attack, including that of the governor, whose head was carried through Paris on a pike. Soldiers invalided out of regular service – and conditions were fairly comfortable for most inmates, with relaxed visiting hours and furnished lodgings. The painter Jean Fragonard’s sketch of visiting day in 1785 shows fashionable ladies promenading around the courtyard with the prisoners, who were given a generous spending allowance, plenty of tobacco and alcohol, and were allowed to keep pets.

42.

Study the advertisement.

 

 

You are considering having a holiday and now you’d like to get more information. In 1.5 minutes you are to ask five direct questions to find out about the following:

 

1) location

2) accommodation

3) fishing

4) price for a week for one

5) group discounts

 

You have 20 seconds to ask each question.

43.

These are photos from your photo album. Choose one photo to describe to your friend.

 

 

You will have to start speaking in 1.5 minutes and will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). In your talk remember to speak about:

 

• where and when the photo was taken

• what/who is in the photo

• what is happening

• why you keep the photo in your album

• why you decided to show the picture to your friend

 

You have to talk continuously, starting with: "I’ve chosen photo number … ".

44.

Study the two photographs. In 1.5 minutes be ready to compare and contrast the photographs:

• give a brief description of the photos (action, location)

• say what the pictures have in common

• say in what way the pictures are different

• say which of the activities presented in the pictures you’d prefer

• explain why

You will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). You have to talk continuously.