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Вариант № 983645

1.

Вы услышите 6 высказываний. Установите соответствие между высказываниями каждого говорящего A–F и утверждениями, данными в списке 1–7. Используйте каждое утверждение, обозначенное соответствующей цифрой, только один раз. В задании есть одно лишнее утверждение. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

1. I eat little and rather irregularly.

2. I am trying to get used to everyday healthy activities.

3. I feel unable to stop myself from eating.

4. I am afraid of having the same health problems as my relatives do.

5. I am willing to return to a healthy lifestyle despite being tired.

6. I am sure that I exercise enough while carrying out my everyday duties.

7. I feel now like starting a healthy life again.

 

 

 

 

ГоворящийABCDEF
Утверждение

2.

Вы услышите диалог. Определите, какие из приведённых утверждений А–G соответствуют содержанию текста (1 – True), какие не соответствуют (2 – False) и о чём в тексте не сказано, то есть на основании текста нельзя дать ни положительного, ни отрицательного ответа (3 – Not stated). Занесите номер выбранного Вами варианта ответа в таблицу. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

A) The job gives Lisa an opportunity to travel abroad.

B) The check-in process at the airport makes Lisa nervous.

C) Lisa always feels comfortable during the flight.

D) When on business trips Lisa doesn’t have to work long hours.

E) On her business trips Lisa signs a lot of important contracts.

F) Lisa spends a lot of money in duty-free shops.

G) There is a computer in the business lounge for passengers who want to do some urgent work.

 

Запишите в ответ цифры, расположив их в порядке, соответствующем буквам:

ABCDEFG
       

3.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Viral marketing is used to promote

 

1) only chocolate, health products and football teams..

2) things that potential buyers need badly.

3) all types of goods, products and other things.

4.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

What is TRUE about Viral marketing and advertising?

 

1) It is inexpensive compared to traditional advertising.

2) It is always more successful than “hard sell” advertising.

3) It randomly contacts huge numbers of people.

5.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

What is NOT TRUE about Viral advertising and marketing?

 

1) It forces people to buy unnecessary things.

2) It only works on teenagers or people with hobbies.

3) It is the practice of placing messages on Internet sites.

6.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

It is called an epidemic when

 

1) huge numbers of people buy what they really need.

2) lots of people become internet friends.

3) huge numbers of people pass on a sales message.

7.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Many believe that viral marketing is wrong because

 

1) it steals peoples secrets.

2) hired people pretend to be members of a chat group.

3) it puts innocent comments on the internet.

8.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Astroturfing is about

 

1) sharing and discussing political opinions.

2) spontaneous “word of mouth” opinion sharing.

3) falsely creating public opinion.

9.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The writer believes the best way to get an opinion is to

 

1) be cautious about astroturfing techniques.

2) hear it in real conversations.

3) avoid fake messages.

10.

Уста­но­ви­те со­от­вет­ствие между за­го­лов­ка­ми 1–8 и тек­ста­ми A–G. За­пи­ши­те свои от­ве­ты в таб­ли­цу. Ис­поль­зуй­те каж­дую цифру толь­ко один раз. В за­да­нии есть один лиш­ний за­го­ло­вок.

 

1. Expenses

2. Ways of behaviour

3. Nightlife

4. Favourite food

5. Place to stay in

6. Eating out

7. National languages

8. Great outdoors

 

A. Norway is first of all a land for those who love nature. The breathtaking fjords in the southwest of the country and Europe’s largest glacier are Norway’s most attractive places, but there are many other reasons to visit this country in the north of Europe. There are wonderful opportunities to enjoy skiing, fishing and rock-climbing. Others can take pleasure in the charm of the Norwegian countryside, with its countless valleys, high mountain lakes and unbelievable views.

 

B. Many tourists coming to Norway in the summer prefer to stay in a cottage used by northern Norwegian fishermen during the winter cod-fishing season. Equipped with all the necessary facilities, these cottages are leased to holidaymakers, providing an attractive form of accommodation. They will often be actually over the water. Catching your own fish and cooking it on the fire will add a few pleasant moments to your holiday.

 

C. Norway has a long history of fishing, although much of the high quality shellfish and other species caught off the coast are exported. However, fish remains a common dish, along with meat, potatoes and other root vegetables, although tastes have changed in recent years to involve a wider international choice, including pizzas and burgers. The most popular traditional hot snack is a form of sausage, sold at numerous outlets.

 

D. Traditionally entertainment in the country is largely home-based, but this has been changing in recent years. Most Norwegians tend to go out only on Fridays and Saturdays, the rest of the week being fairly quiet. This is in no small part due to the high prices of food and drink, and the fact that the working day starts early. And at weekends, it is normal for the Norwegians to enjoy drinks at home before leaving it as late as 11.00 p.m.

 

E. Restaurants tend to be concentrated in city centres, while in recent years the pub culture has been gradually arriving in Norway. Cities are nowadays well supplied with a wide choice of bars, many of which offer food that has a lower price compared to the restaurants. Most villages of any size have at least one cafe or restaurant where it is possible to drink and eat out.

 

F. Norwegians are generally sincere and polite, though communication doesn’t often come easy — it is usually up to you to break the ice and establish contact. They can be very direct and rarely say ‘please’, which may seem rude, but it’s due to the fact that the Norwegian language rarely uses the word. On the other hand, they say ‘thank you’ for almost everything. They also tend to address people by their first name even on many formal occasions.

 

G. Norway is an expensive country. As labour is costly here, anything that can be seen as a ‘service’ will generally be more expensive than you expect. Transport costs can also be a killer, because the country is large and distances are long. But there is one good point: Norway has a high quality of tap water. So buying bottled drinking water is usually unnecessary and this will save your budget.

 

 

ТекстABCDEFG
За­го­ло­вок

11.

Прочитайте текст и заполните пропуски A–F частями предложений, обозначенными цифрами 1–7. Одна из частей в списке 1–7 — лишняя. Занесите цифры, обозначающие соответствующие части предложений, в таблицу.

 

 

Harry Potter course for university students

 

Students of Durham University are being given the chance to sign up to what is thought to be the UK’s first course focusing on the world of Harry Potter. Although every English-speaking person in the world knows about Harry Potter books and films, few have thought of using them as a guide to ... modern life.

The Durham University module uses the works of JK Rowling A ______ modern society. “Harry Potter and the Age of Illusion” will be available for study next year. So far about 80 undergraduates have signed В ______ a BA degree in Education Studies. Future

educationalists will analyse JK Rowling’s fanfiction from various points of view.

A university spokesman said: “This module places the Harry Potter novels in a wider social and cultural context.” He added that a number of themes would be explored, С ______ the classroom, bullying, friendship and solidarity and the ideals of and good citizenship.

The module was created by the head of the Department of Education at Durham University. He said the idea for the new module had appeared in response D ______ body: “It seeks to place the series in its wider social and cultural context and will explore some fundamental issues E ______ . You just need to read the academic writing which started F ______ that Harry Potter is worthy of serious study.”

 

1. up for the optional module, part of

2. to emerge four or five years ago to see

3. to examine prejudice, citizenship and bullying in

4. such as the response of the writer

5. including the world of rituals, prejudice and intolerance in

6. to growing demand from the student

7. such as the moral universe of the school

 

 

ПропускABCDEF
Часть предложения

12.

The unlimited liberty of reading for the narrator means

 

1) access to different types of books.

2) freedom in choosing and interpreting books.

3) possibility to challenge other opinions on the book.

4) opportunity to select what to read according to the mood.


The Joy and Enthusiasm of Reading

I believe in the absolute and unlimited liberty of reading. I believe in wandering through the huge stacks of books and picking out the first thing that strikes me. I believe in choosing books based on the dust jacket. I believe in reading books because others dislike them or find them dangerous, or too thick to spend their free time on, or too difficult to understand. I believe in choosing the hardest book imaginable. I believe in reading what others have to say about this difficult book, and then making up my own mind, agreeing or disagreeing with what I have read and understood.

 

Part of this has to do with Mr. Buxton, who taught me Shakespeare in the 10th grade. We were reading Macbeth. Mr. Buxton, who probably had better things to do, nonetheless agreed to meet one night to go over the text line by line. The first thing he did was point out the repetition of motifs. For example, the reversals of things (‘fair is foul and foul is fair’). Then there was the association of masculinity with violence in the play.

 

What Mr. Buxton did not tell me was what the play meant. He left the conclusions to me. The situation was much the same with my history teacher in 11th grade, Mr. Flanders, who encouraged me to have my own relationship with historical events and my own attitude to them. He often quoted famous historians in the process. I especially liked the one who said, ‘Those who forget their history have no future.’

 

High school was followed by college, where I read Umberto Eco’s Role of the Reader, in which it is said that the reader completes the text, that the text is never finished until it meets this careful and engaged reader. The open texts, Eco calls them. In college, I read some of the great Europeans and Latin Americans. All the works I read were open texts. It was an exciting experience. Besides, I got familiar with wonderful works of literary criticism.

 

There are those critics, of course, who insist that there are right ways and wrong ways to read every book.

 

No doubt they arrived at these beliefs through their own adventures in the stacks. Perhaps their adventures were not so exciting or romantic. And these are important questions for philosophers of every character. But yet I know only what joy and enthusiasm about reading have taught me, in bookstores new and used. They have taught me not to be afraid of something new, unusual or non*traditional, not to deny it but embrace it and try to understand even if you cannot agree with it. Not to stay within the boundaries but always seek for something new and enjoy every second of this creative process and be happy every time you get some result, no matter how positive or negative.

 

I believe there is not now and never will be an authority who can tell me how to interpret, how to read, how to find the pearl of literary meaning in all cases. There exist thousands of versions, interpretations, colours and shadows. You could spend a lifetime thinking about a sentence, and making it your own. In just this way, I believe in the freedom to see literature, history, truth, unfolding ahead of me like a book whose spine has just now been cracked.

13.

The narrator thinks that his love of reading

 

1) is an inborn quality.

2) developed early at school.

3) was initially fostered by Mr. Buxton.

4) is all due to the efforts of his Shakespeare teacher.


The Joy and Enthusiasm of Reading

I believe in the absolute and unlimited liberty of reading. I believe in wandering through the huge stacks of books and picking out the first thing that strikes me. I believe in choosing books based on the dust jacket. I believe in reading books because others dislike them or find them dangerous, or too thick to spend their free time on, or too difficult to understand. I believe in choosing the hardest book imaginable. I believe in reading what others have to say about this difficult book, and then making up my own mind, agreeing or disagreeing with what I have read and understood.

 

Part of this has to do with Mr. Buxton, who taught me Shakespeare in the 10th grade. We were reading Macbeth. Mr. Buxton, who probably had better things to do, nonetheless agreed to meet one night to go over the text line by line. The first thing he did was point out the repetition of motifs. For example, the reversals of things (‘fair is foul and foul is fair’). Then there was the association of masculinity with violence in the play.

 

What Mr. Buxton did not tell me was what the play meant. He left the conclusions to me. The situation was much the same with my history teacher in 11th grade, Mr. Flanders, who encouraged me to have my own relationship with historical events and my own attitude to them. He often quoted famous historians in the process. I especially liked the one who said, ‘Those who forget their history have no future.’

 

High school was followed by college, where I read Umberto Eco’s Role of the Reader, in which it is said that the reader completes the text, that the text is never finished until it meets this careful and engaged reader. The open texts, Eco calls them. In college, I read some of the great Europeans and Latin Americans. All the works I read were open texts. It was an exciting experience. Besides, I got familiar with wonderful works of literary criticism.

 

There are those critics, of course, who insist that there are right ways and wrong ways to read every book.

 

No doubt they arrived at these beliefs through their own adventures in the stacks. Perhaps their adventures were not so exciting or romantic. And these are important questions for philosophers of every character. But yet I know only what joy and enthusiasm about reading have taught me, in bookstores new and used. They have taught me not to be afraid of something new, unusual or non*traditional, not to deny it but embrace it and try to understand even if you cannot agree with it. Not to stay within the boundaries but always seek for something new and enjoy every second of this creative process and be happy every time you get some result, no matter how positive or negative.

 

I believe there is not now and never will be an authority who can tell me how to interpret, how to read, how to find the pearl of literary meaning in all cases. There exist thousands of versions, interpretations, colours and shadows. You could spend a lifetime thinking about a sentence, and making it your own. In just this way, I believe in the freedom to see literature, history, truth, unfolding ahead of me like a book whose spine has just now been cracked.

14.

The narrator gives credit to Mr. Buxton for teaching him how to

 

1) love classical literature.

2) read Shakespeare aloud.

3) interpret stylistic devices.

4) find the meaning of a book for oneself.


The Joy and Enthusiasm of Reading

I believe in the absolute and unlimited liberty of reading. I believe in wandering through the huge stacks of books and picking out the first thing that strikes me. I believe in choosing books based on the dust jacket. I believe in reading books because others dislike them or find them dangerous, or too thick to spend their free time on, or too difficult to understand. I believe in choosing the hardest book imaginable. I believe in reading what others have to say about this difficult book, and then making up my own mind, agreeing or disagreeing with what I have read and understood.

 

Part of this has to do with Mr. Buxton, who taught me Shakespeare in the 10th grade. We were reading Macbeth. Mr. Buxton, who probably had better things to do, nonetheless agreed to meet one night to go over the text line by line. The first thing he did was point out the repetition of motifs. For example, the reversals of things (‘fair is foul and foul is fair’). Then there was the association of masculinity with violence in the play.

 

What Mr. Buxton did not tell me was what the play meant. He left the conclusions to me. The situation was much the same with my history teacher in 11th grade, Mr. Flanders, who encouraged me to have my own relationship with historical events and my own attitude to them. He often quoted famous historians in the process. I especially liked the one who said, ‘Those who forget their history have no future.’

 

High school was followed by college, where I read Umberto Eco’s Role of the Reader, in which it is said that the reader completes the text, that the text is never finished until it meets this careful and engaged reader. The open texts, Eco calls them. In college, I read some of the great Europeans and Latin Americans. All the works I read were open texts. It was an exciting experience. Besides, I got familiar with wonderful works of literary criticism.

 

There are those critics, of course, who insist that there are right ways and wrong ways to read every book.

 

No doubt they arrived at these beliefs through their own adventures in the stacks. Perhaps their adventures were not so exciting or romantic. And these are important questions for philosophers of every character. But yet I know only what joy and enthusiasm about reading have taught me, in bookstores new and used. They have taught me not to be afraid of something new, unusual or non*traditional, not to deny it but embrace it and try to understand even if you cannot agree with it. Not to stay within the boundaries but always seek for something new and enjoy every second of this creative process and be happy every time you get some result, no matter how positive or negative.

 

I believe there is not now and never will be an authority who can tell me how to interpret, how to read, how to find the pearl of literary meaning in all cases. There exist thousands of versions, interpretations, colours and shadows. You could spend a lifetime thinking about a sentence, and making it your own. In just this way, I believe in the freedom to see literature, history, truth, unfolding ahead of me like a book whose spine has just now been cracked.

15.

The history teacher quoted famous historians to prove that people

 

1) are often blind or deaf to learning.

2) understand historical texts too literally.

3) can’t understand the meaning of historical events.

4) should learn from history not to make similar mistakes.


The Joy and Enthusiasm of Reading

I believe in the absolute and unlimited liberty of reading. I believe in wandering through the huge stacks of books and picking out the first thing that strikes me. I believe in choosing books based on the dust jacket. I believe in reading books because others dislike them or find them dangerous, or too thick to spend their free time on, or too difficult to understand. I believe in choosing the hardest book imaginable. I believe in reading what others have to say about this difficult book, and then making up my own mind, agreeing or disagreeing with what I have read and understood.

 

Part of this has to do with Mr. Buxton, who taught me Shakespeare in the 10th grade. We were reading Macbeth. Mr. Buxton, who probably had better things to do, nonetheless agreed to meet one night to go over the text line by line. The first thing he did was point out the repetition of motifs. For example, the reversals of things (‘fair is foul and foul is fair’). Then there was the association of masculinity with violence in the play.

 

What Mr. Buxton did not tell me was what the play meant. He left the conclusions to me. The situation was much the same with my history teacher in 11th grade, Mr. Flanders, who encouraged me to have my own relationship with historical events and my own attitude to them. He often quoted famous historians in the process. I especially liked the one who said, ‘Those who forget their history have no future.’

 

High school was followed by college, where I read Umberto Eco’s Role of the Reader, in which it is said that the reader completes the text, that the text is never finished until it meets this careful and engaged reader. The open texts, Eco calls them. In college, I read some of the great Europeans and Latin Americans. All the works I read were open texts. It was an exciting experience. Besides, I got familiar with wonderful works of literary criticism.

 

There are those critics, of course, who insist that there are right ways and wrong ways to read every book.

 

No doubt they arrived at these beliefs through their own adventures in the stacks. Perhaps their adventures were not so exciting or romantic. And these are important questions for philosophers of every character. But yet I know only what joy and enthusiasm about reading have taught me, in bookstores new and used. They have taught me not to be afraid of something new, unusual or non*traditional, not to deny it but embrace it and try to understand even if you cannot agree with it. Not to stay within the boundaries but always seek for something new and enjoy every second of this creative process and be happy every time you get some result, no matter how positive or negative.

 

I believe there is not now and never will be an authority who can tell me how to interpret, how to read, how to find the pearl of literary meaning in all cases. There exist thousands of versions, interpretations, colours and shadows. You could spend a lifetime thinking about a sentence, and making it your own. In just this way, I believe in the freedom to see literature, history, truth, unfolding ahead of me like a book whose spine has just now been cracked.

16.

According to Umberto Eco, an open text is a text

 

1) commented on by the author.

2) plus the reader’s attitude to it.

3) that the author has not finished.

4) with different variants of an end.


The Joy and Enthusiasm of Reading

I believe in the absolute and unlimited liberty of reading. I believe in wandering through the huge stacks of books and picking out the first thing that strikes me. I believe in choosing books based on the dust jacket. I believe in reading books because others dislike them or find them dangerous, or too thick to spend their free time on, or too difficult to understand. I believe in choosing the hardest book imaginable. I believe in reading what others have to say about this difficult book, and then making up my own mind, agreeing or disagreeing with what I have read and understood.

 

Part of this has to do with Mr. Buxton, who taught me Shakespeare in the 10th grade. We were reading Macbeth. Mr. Buxton, who probably had better things to do, nonetheless agreed to meet one night to go over the text line by line. The first thing he did was point out the repetition of motifs. For example, the reversals of things (‘fair is foul and foul is fair’). Then there was the association of masculinity with violence in the play.

 

What Mr. Buxton did not tell me was what the play meant. He left the conclusions to me. The situation was much the same with my history teacher in 11th grade, Mr. Flanders, who encouraged me to have my own relationship with historical events and my own attitude to them. He often quoted famous historians in the process. I especially liked the one who said, ‘Those who forget their history have no future.’

 

High school was followed by college, where I read Umberto Eco’s Role of the Reader, in which it is said that the reader completes the text, that the text is never finished until it meets this careful and engaged reader. The open texts, Eco calls them. In college, I read some of the great Europeans and Latin Americans. All the works I read were open texts. It was an exciting experience. Besides, I got familiar with wonderful works of literary criticism.

 

There are those critics, of course, who insist that there are right ways and wrong ways to read every book.

 

No doubt they arrived at these beliefs through their own adventures in the stacks. Perhaps their adventures were not so exciting or romantic. And these are important questions for philosophers of every character. But yet I know only what joy and enthusiasm about reading have taught me, in bookstores new and used. They have taught me not to be afraid of something new, unusual or non*traditional, not to deny it but embrace it and try to understand even if you cannot agree with it. Not to stay within the boundaries but always seek for something new and enjoy every second of this creative process and be happy every time you get some result, no matter how positive or negative.

 

I believe there is not now and never will be an authority who can tell me how to interpret, how to read, how to find the pearl of literary meaning in all cases. There exist thousands of versions, interpretations, colours and shadows. You could spend a lifetime thinking about a sentence, and making it your own. In just this way, I believe in the freedom to see literature, history, truth, unfolding ahead of me like a book whose spine has just now been cracked.

17.

Some critics say about text interpretation that

 

1) only philosophers should interpret texts.

2) people should enjoy books but not interpret them.

3) there are several ways to interpret a text.

4) there is the right interpretation to every book.


The Joy and Enthusiasm of Reading

I believe in the absolute and unlimited liberty of reading. I believe in wandering through the huge stacks of books and picking out the first thing that strikes me. I believe in choosing books based on the dust jacket. I believe in reading books because others dislike them or find them dangerous, or too thick to spend their free time on, or too difficult to understand. I believe in choosing the hardest book imaginable. I believe in reading what others have to say about this difficult book, and then making up my own mind, agreeing or disagreeing with what I have read and understood.

 

Part of this has to do with Mr. Buxton, who taught me Shakespeare in the 10th grade. We were reading Macbeth. Mr. Buxton, who probably had better things to do, nonetheless agreed to meet one night to go over the text line by line. The first thing he did was point out the repetition of motifs. For example, the reversals of things (‘fair is foul and foul is fair’). Then there was the association of masculinity with violence in the play.

 

What Mr. Buxton did not tell me was what the play meant. He left the conclusions to me. The situation was much the same with my history teacher in 11th grade, Mr. Flanders, who encouraged me to have my own relationship with historical events and my own attitude to them. He often quoted famous historians in the process. I especially liked the one who said, ‘Those who forget their history have no future.’

 

High school was followed by college, where I read Umberto Eco’s Role of the Reader, in which it is said that the reader completes the text, that the text is never finished until it meets this careful and engaged reader. The open texts, Eco calls them. In college, I read some of the great Europeans and Latin Americans. All the works I read were open texts. It was an exciting experience. Besides, I got familiar with wonderful works of literary criticism.

 

There are those critics, of course, who insist that there are right ways and wrong ways to read every book.

 

No doubt they arrived at these beliefs through their own adventures in the stacks. Perhaps their adventures were not so exciting or romantic. And these are important questions for philosophers of every character. But yet I know only what joy and enthusiasm about reading have taught me, in bookstores new and used. They have taught me not to be afraid of something new, unusual or non*traditional, not to deny it but embrace it and try to understand even if you cannot agree with it. Not to stay within the boundaries but always seek for something new and enjoy every second of this creative process and be happy every time you get some result, no matter how positive or negative.

 

I believe there is not now and never will be an authority who can tell me how to interpret, how to read, how to find the pearl of literary meaning in all cases. There exist thousands of versions, interpretations, colours and shadows. You could spend a lifetime thinking about a sentence, and making it your own. In just this way, I believe in the freedom to see literature, history, truth, unfolding ahead of me like a book whose spine has just now been cracked.

18.

The narrator believes that

 

1) it is impossible to interpret good writers.

2) interpreting is collective intellectual work.

3) authorities in interpreting will appear in future.

4) one should find a proper interpretation by oneself.


The Joy and Enthusiasm of Reading

I believe in the absolute and unlimited liberty of reading. I believe in wandering through the huge stacks of books and picking out the first thing that strikes me. I believe in choosing books based on the dust jacket. I believe in reading books because others dislike them or find them dangerous, or too thick to spend their free time on, or too difficult to understand. I believe in choosing the hardest book imaginable. I believe in reading what others have to say about this difficult book, and then making up my own mind, agreeing or disagreeing with what I have read and understood.

 

Part of this has to do with Mr. Buxton, who taught me Shakespeare in the 10th grade. We were reading Macbeth. Mr. Buxton, who probably had better things to do, nonetheless agreed to meet one night to go over the text line by line. The first thing he did was point out the repetition of motifs. For example, the reversals of things (‘fair is foul and foul is fair’). Then there was the association of masculinity with violence in the play.

 

What Mr. Buxton did not tell me was what the play meant. He left the conclusions to me. The situation was much the same with my history teacher in 11th grade, Mr. Flanders, who encouraged me to have my own relationship with historical events and my own attitude to them. He often quoted famous historians in the process. I especially liked the one who said, ‘Those who forget their history have no future.’

 

High school was followed by college, where I read Umberto Eco’s Role of the Reader, in which it is said that the reader completes the text, that the text is never finished until it meets this careful and engaged reader. The open texts, Eco calls them. In college, I read some of the great Europeans and Latin Americans. All the works I read were open texts. It was an exciting experience. Besides, I got familiar with wonderful works of literary criticism.

 

There are those critics, of course, who insist that there are right ways and wrong ways to read every book.

 

No doubt they arrived at these beliefs through their own adventures in the stacks. Perhaps their adventures were not so exciting or romantic. And these are important questions for philosophers of every character. But yet I know only what joy and enthusiasm about reading have taught me, in bookstores new and used. They have taught me not to be afraid of something new, unusual or non*traditional, not to deny it but embrace it and try to understand even if you cannot agree with it. Not to stay within the boundaries but always seek for something new and enjoy every second of this creative process and be happy every time you get some result, no matter how positive or negative.

 

I believe there is not now and never will be an authority who can tell me how to interpret, how to read, how to find the pearl of literary meaning in all cases. There exist thousands of versions, interpretations, colours and shadows. You could spend a lifetime thinking about a sentence, and making it your own. In just this way, I believe in the freedom to see literature, history, truth, unfolding ahead of me like a book whose spine has just now been cracked.

19.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово TWENTY так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

 

Scottish Castle

 

For more than 800 years the castle was a fortress against the English and rival Scottish clans. For the most part it was in a state of neglect since then. About 150 years ago it became a luxurious farm house and then in the early part of the ______ century it became a hunting and fishing lodge.

20.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово STRONG так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Wealthy visitors paid good money trying to catch Atlantic salmon — the Scotland’s ______ sporting fish.

21.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово SWIM так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

The inspiration to restore the castle came to John Faulkner when he ______ in the sea on an unusually warm August afternoon.

22.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово REALISE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Now, ten years after that summer swim, he is in the mood for celebration as he finally ______ his biggest ambition. All the difficult and expensive restoration is finished and his first guests are due to arrive this evening.

23.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово SERVE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

 

Restaurant with a Difference

 

The Rapid River Camp is a huge family style restaurant. Food ______ and even the cooking is done by staff in period costume.

24.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово NOT NEED так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

One ______ to choose one of the big, high calorie dishes loved by real forest workers. In fact there is a large menu to suit all tastes and appetites.

25.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово CUT так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

On Tuesdays and Fridays you can also see demonstrations of a steam powered saw, ______ up the wood just as it did 100 years ago.

26.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово CONSERVE так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Cyberspace communication

 

Nowadays most of us go to our computers to connect with friends instead of using our phones. Cyberspace relationships have become the norm for many people, even the most ____________ ones.

27.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово EFFECTIVE так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

The convenience and ______________ of the Web is amazing. If we want to see a movie, find a place to eat or get in touch with a friend, we go to the Web before we call on the phone.

28.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово USE так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Critics, however, say that cyberspace communication loses some important factors of the social atmosphere. Most Web __________ don't understand that when we talk to someone, we get many messages from them just by their tone of voice and body language.

29.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово EXPRESS так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

A tender ____________ and eye contact cannot possibly be experienced over the Internet.

30.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово COMFORT так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

As with anything we do, without regular practice the act can become unfamiliar and __________.

31.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово REAL так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

There is a possibility that much can be ___________ lost when we communicate via the Internet.

32.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) obliged

2) demanded

3) required

4) compelled


Diana

 

Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 32 ______ the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn't hesitate to 33 ______ her that they had lost two similar contracts that week.

 

To 34 ______ the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00.

 

Diana adored her children. At first 35 ______ she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 36 ______ moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic.

 

She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 37 ______ hastily on a Friday evening could be 38 ______ in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

33.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) recall

2) remember

3) recollect

4) remind


Diana

 

Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 32 ______ the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn't hesitate to 33 ______ her that they had lost two similar contracts that week.

 

To 34 ______ the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00.

 

Diana adored her children. At first 35 ______ she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 36 ______ moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic.

 

She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 37 ______ hastily on a Friday evening could be 38 ______ in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

34.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) tell

2) speak

3) talk

4) say


Diana

 

Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 32 ______ the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn't hesitate to 33 ______ her that they had lost two similar contracts that week.

 

To 34 ______ the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00.

 

Diana adored her children. At first 35 ______ she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 36 ______ moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic.

 

She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 37 ______ hastily on a Friday evening could be 38 ______ in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

35.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) glimpse

2) look

3) sight

4) view


Diana

 

Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 32 ______ the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn't hesitate to 33 ______ her that they had lost two similar contracts that week.

 

To 34 ______ the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00.

 

Diana adored her children. At first 35 ______ she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 36 ______ moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic.

 

She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 37 ______ hastily on a Friday evening could be 38 ______ in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

36.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) few

2) little

3) much

4) many


Diana

 

Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 32 ______ the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn't hesitate to 33 ______ her that they had lost two similar contracts that week.

 

To 34 ______ the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00.

 

Diana adored her children. At first 35 ______ she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 36 ______ moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic.

 

She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 37 ______ hastily on a Friday evening could be 38 ______ in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

37.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) took

2) made

3) held

4) done


Diana

 

Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 32 ______ the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn't hesitate to 33 ______ her that they had lost two similar contracts that week.

 

To 34 ______ the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00.

 

Diana adored her children. At first 35 ______ she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 36 ______ moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic.

 

She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 37 ______ hastily on a Friday evening could be 38 ______ in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

38.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) disappointed

2) dissatisfied

3) apologized

4) regretted


Diana

 

Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 32 ______ the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn't hesitate to 33 ______ her that they had lost two similar contracts that week.

 

To 34 ______ the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00.

 

Diana adored her children. At first 35 ______ she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 36 ______ moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic.

 

She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 37 ______ hastily on a Friday evening could be 38 ______ in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

39.

You have received a letter from your English-speaking pen-friend Jane who writes:

 

...Last month our class went to Washington. It was my first visit there and it was fun! Have you travelled much around Russia? Where would like to go if you have a chance? Why would you like to go there, what places of interest would you like to see? Is there anything interesting in the region where you live?

This summer we plan to go to the mountains with my parents...

 

Write a letter to Jane. In your letter answer her questions, ask 3 questions about the trip to the mountains. Write 100—140 words. Remember the rules of letter writing. You have 20 minutes to do this task.

40.

Выберите только ОДНО из двух предложенных высказываний и выразите своё мнение по предложенной проблеме согласно данному плану.

 

Comment on one of the following statements.

 

1. Good clothes open all doors.

2. Exams motivate students to study harder.

 

What is your opinion? Do you agree with this statement? Write 200–250 words. Use the following plan:

− make an introduction (state the problem)

− express your personal opinion and give 2–3 reasons for your opinion

− express an opposing opinion and give 1–2 reasons for this opposing opinion

− explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion

− make a conclusion restating your position

41.

Imagine that you are preparing a project with your friend. You have found some interesting material for the presentation and you want to read this text to your friend. You have 1.5 minutes to read the text silently, then be ready to read it out aloud. You will not have more than 1.5 minutes to read it.

 

Champagne was not invented in France. It may come as surprise – even an outrage – to them but champagne is an English invention. As anyone who has made their own ginger beer knows, fermentation naturally produces bubbles. The problem has always been controlling it. The English developed a taste for fizzy wine in the sixteenth century, importing barrels of green, flat wine from Champagne and adding sugar and molasses to start it fermenting. They also developed the strong coal-fired glass bottles and corks to contain it.

A legal loophole uniquely allows Americans to call their sparkling wines champagne. The Treaty of Madrid decreed that only the Champagne region may use that name. This was reaffirmed by the Treaty of Versailles but the US signed a separate peace agreement with Germany. When prohibition was lifted, American wine-merchants took advantage of this loophole, freely selling their own Champagne, much to the annoyance of the French.

42.

9) Study the advertisement.

 

 

 

You are considering to buy ipad and you'd like to get more information. In 1.5 minutes you are to ask five direct questions to find out the following:

1) the amount of internal memory

2) if they provide a free delivery service

3) if they have special offers

4) advantages of the device

5) if they have a black color

You have 20 seconds to ask each question.

43.

These are photos from your photo album. Choose one photo to describe to your friend.

 

 

You will have to start speaking in 1.5 minutes and will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). In your talk remember to speak about:

• where and when the photo was taken

• what/who is in the photo

• what is happening

• why you keep the photo in your album

• why you decided to show the picture to your friend

You have to talk continuously, starting with:

"I’ve chosen photo number… "

44.

Study the two photographs. In 1.5 minutes be ready to compare and contrast the photographs:

 

• give a brief description of the photos (action, location)

• say what the pictures have in common

• say in what way the pictures are different

• say what kind of fighting presented in the photos you like more

• explain why

 

You will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). You have to talk continuously.