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Вариант № 983642

1.

Вы услышите 6 высказываний. Установите соответствие между высказываниями каждого говорящего A–F и утверждениями, данными в списке 1–7. Используйте каждое утверждение, обозначенное соответствующей цифрой, только один раз. В задании есть одно лишнее утверждение. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

1. A uniform makes the school a better organized place.

2. Uniforms help improve the discipline at schools.

3. Uniforms can help prevent crimes at school.

4. Uniforms will not make life at school better.

5. Uniforms can teach students how to behave professionally.

6. Getting used to uniforms is good for a future career.

7. Uniforms make students focus more on their learning.

 

ГоворящийABCDEF
Утверждение

2.

Вы услышите диалог. Определите, какие из приведённых утверждений А–G соответствуют содержанию текста (1 – True), какие не соответствуют (2 – False) и о чём в тексте не сказано, то есть на основании текста нельзя дать ни положительного, ни отрицательного ответа (3 – Not stated). Занесите номер выбранного Вами варианта ответа в таблицу. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

A) Peter seldom goes to the library.

B) Peter is satisfied with his term studies.

C) Peter hopes to do as well in the course as his classmates.

D) Peter prefers to work at his computer at home.

E) Jane does not expect Peter to pass his language exam.

F) Jane has always been the best student in the group.

G) Jane has some problems with one of her subjects.

 

Запишите в ответ цифры, расположив их в порядке, соответствующем буквам:

ABCDEFG
       

3.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The narrator was brought up mainly in

 

1) Denmark.

2) England.

3) the USA.

4.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The narrator is not happy about Danish grocery stores because of

 

1) the quality of the products.

2) their size.

3) the poor choice of foods.

5.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The narrator criticizes

 

1) the lifestyle in Denmark.

2) Danish supermarkets.

3) the Danish diet.

6.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The prices in the Danish stores are quite high because

 

1) the level of service is very high.

2) everything is imported from abroad.

3) there are no artificial foods.

7.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

According to the unwritten rules of Danish supermarket culture

 

1) you pack all the food you buy on your own, without any help.

2) shop assistants are always ready to pack your food for you.

3) there are clerks whose duty is to help you with your bagging.

8.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

When the narrator says, “I do miss American convenience” it means that he

 

1) wants ready-made dinners to be delivered to his place.

2) wants to rent a flat near a big supermarket.

3) doesn’t like to spend much time cooking his meals.

9.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Having lived in Denmark for a few years as a student, the narrator

 

1) feels nostalgic about the USA.

2) believes it to be a good place for him.

3) pities Danish people.

10.

Установите соответствие между заголовками 1–8 и текстами A–G. Запишите свои ответы в таблицу. Используйте каждую цифру только один раз. В задании есть один лишний заголовок.

 

1. Useful Invention

2. US Younger Generation

3. Modern Branch of Industry

4. Historical Separation

5. Verbal Misunderstanding

6. Britain, the World Empire

7. All in One

8. Old Enough

 

A. For 150 years America was a British colony. At that time British and American English were almost exactly the same. When America won the War of Independence in 1776, it became a free country. The USA was quickly growing richer, and millions of Europeans came to settle here. They brought new words and expressions to the language. As a result, English in America began to develop in its own way and today, there are certain differences in pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary and spelling between American and British English.

 

B. Typical American teenagers are in fact very ordinary. They think their teachers make them work too hard, they love their parents but are sure they don’t understand anything, and their friendships are the most important things in their lives. Some of them do have a lot of money to spend, but usually they have earned it themselves. Most young people take jobs while they are in school. They work at movie theatres, fast-food restaurants, gas stations, and stores to pay for their clothes and entertainment. Maybe this is what makes them so independent from their parents at such a young age?

 

C. Is it possible to have one device with the functions of a TV-set, a PC and the Internet? With the advent of Internet TV it has become a reality. Imagine watching a film on TV and getting information on the actors in the film at the same time! To enter web-addresses and write e-mails you use a remote control and an on-screen keyboard or an optional wireless keyboard. By clicking a button, you can also read adverts, ‘chat’ with a friend, plan your holiday and play your favourite video games. And in the future you’ll be able to change the plot of the film you are watching!

 

D. When do you stop being a child and become an adult? There are lots of laws about the age when you can start doing things. In Britain, for example, you can get married at 16, but you cannot get a tattoo until you are 18. In most American states you can have a driving licence at 17, but you cannot drink until you are 21. In Russia you can be put to prison when you are 16, but you cannot vote until you are 18. In fact, most European countries and the US have the same age for voting: 18. Many people, however, think that this is unfair. They would like to vote at an earlier age.

 

E. Blue jeans were a by-product of the Gold Rush. The man who invented jeans, Levi Strauss, emigrated from Germany to San Francisco in 1850. Levi was 20 years old, and he decided to sell clothes to the miners who were in California in search of gold. When he was told that durable trousers were the most needed item of clothing, Levi began making jeans of heavy tent canvas. Levi’s jeans were an immediate success. Soon he switched from canvas to a cotton fabric which came from Nimes, a city in France. The miners called it ‘denim’ and bought a lot of trousers from Strauss.

 

F. Some fifty years ago people hadn’t even heard of computers, and today we cannot imagine our life without them. Computer technology is now the fastest-growing industry in the world. The first computer was the size of a minibus and weighed a ton. Today, its job can be done by a chip the size of a pinhead. And the revolution is still going on. Very soon we’ll have computers that we’ll wear on our wrists or even in our glasses and ear-rings. Such wearable computers are now being developed in the USA.

 

G. Some American words are simply unknown on the other side of the Atlantic, and vice versa. But a lot of words exist in both variants, and these can cause trouble. British visitors to America are often surprised at the different meanings that familiar words have acquired there. If an Englishman asks in an American store for a vest, he will be offered a waistcoat. If he wants to buy a handbag for his wife, he should ask for a purse, and if she wants to buy a pair of tights, she should ask for pantyhose: tights in America are what ballet dancers wear.

 

ТекстABCDEFG
Заголовок

11.

Прочитайте текст и заполните пропуски A–F частями предложений, обозначенными цифрами 1–7. Одна из частей в списке 1–7 — лишняя. Занесите цифры, обозначающие соответствующие части предложений, в таблицу.

 

 

Mobile phones

 

On New Year’s Day, 1985, Michael Harrison phoned his father, Sir Ernest, to wish him a happy new year. Sir Ernest was chairman of Racal Electronics, the owner of Vodafone, A ______ .

At the time, mobile phones weighed almost a kilogram, cost several thousand pounds and provided only 20 minutes talktime. The networks themselves were small; Vodafone had just a dozen masts covering London. Nobody had any idea of the huge potential of wireless communication and the dramatic impact В ______ .

Hardly anyone believed there would come a day when mobile phones were so popular С ______ .But in 1999 one mobile phone was sold in the UK every four seconds, and by 2004 there were more mobile phones in the UK than people. The boom was a result of increased competition which pushed prices lower and created innovations in the way that mobiles were sold.

When the government introduced more competition, companies started cutting prices to attract more customers. Cellnet, for example, changed its prices, D ______ . It also introduced local call tariffs.

The way that handsets themselves were marketed was also changing and it was Finland’s Nokia who made E ______ . In the late 1990s Nokia realized that the mobile phone was a fashion item: so it offered interchangeable covers which allowed you to customize and personalize your handset.

The mobile phone industry has spent the later part of the past decade reducing its monthly charge F ______ , which has culminated in the fight between the iPhone and a succession of touch screen rivals.

 

1. trying to persuade people to do more with their phones than just call and text

2. that there would be more phones in the UK than there are people

3. and relying instead on actual call charges

4. that mobile phones would have over the next quarter century

5. the leap from phones as technology to phones as fashion items

6. and his son was making the first-ever mobile phone call in the UK

7. the move to digital technology, connecting machines to wireless networks

 

 

ПропускABCDEF
Часть предложения

12.

Gabe’s mother thinks that he is

 

1) lazy.

2) determined.

3) selfish.

4) thoughtful.


A Gifted Cook

If there is a gene for cuisine, Gabe, my 11-year-old son, could splice it to perfection. Somewhere between Greenwich Village, where he was born, and the San Francisco Bay area, where he has grown up, the little kid with the stubborn disposition and freckles on his nose has forsaken Boy Scouts and baseball in favor of wielding a kitchen knife.

 

I suppose he is a member of the Emeril generation. Gabe has spent his formative years shopping at the Berkeley Bowl, where over half a dozen varieties of Thanksgiving yams, in lesser mortals, can instill emotional paralysis. He is blessed with a critical eye. “I think Emeril is really cheesy,” he observed the other night while watching a puff pastry segment. “He makes the stupidest jokes. But he cooks really well.”

 

With its manifold indigenous cultures, Oaxaca seemed the perfect place to push boundaries. Like the mole sauces for which it is justly famous, the region itself is a subtle blend of ingredients — from dusty Zapotec villages where Spanish is a second language to the zocalo in colonial Oaxaca, a sophisticated town square brimming with street life and vendors selling twisty, one-story-tall balloons.

 

Appealing to Gabe’s inner Iron Chef seemed like an indirect way to introduce him to a place where the artful approach to life presides. There was also a selfish motive: Gabe is my soul mate, a fellow food wanderer who is not above embracing insanity to follow his appetite wherever it leads.

 

Months ahead of time, we enrolled via the Internet in the daylong Wednesday cooking class at Seasons of My Heart, the chef and cookbook author Susana Trilling’s cooking school in the Elta Valley, about a 45-minute drive north to town. In her cookbook and PBS series of the same name, Ms. Trilling, an American whose maternal grandparents were Mexican, calls Oaxaca “the land of no waste” where cooking techniques in some ancient villages have endured for a thousand years.

 

I suspected that the very notion of what constitutes food in Oaxaca would test Gabe’s mettle. At the suggestion of Jacob, his older brother, we spent our second night in Mexico at a Oaxaca Guerrero baseball game, where instead of peanuts and Cracker Jack, vendors hawked huge trays piled high with chapulines, fried grasshoppers cooked in chili and lime, a local delicacy. Gabe was bug-eyed as he watched the man next to him snack on exoskeletal munchies in a paper bowl. “It’s probably less gross than a hot dog,” he admitted. “But on the rim of the bowl I saw a bunch of legs and served body parts. That’s revolting!”

 

Our cooking day began at the Wednesday market in Etla, shopping for ingredients and sampling as we went. On the way in the van, Gabe had made friends with Cindy and Fred Beams, fellow classmates from Boston, sharing opinions about Caesar salad and bemoaning his brother’s preference for plain pizza instead of Hawaiian. Cindy told Gabe about a delicious sauce she’d just had on her omelet at her В & В. “It was the best sauce — to die for,” she said. “Then I found out the provenance. Roasted worms.”

 

The Oaxacan taste for insects, we’d learn — including the worm salt spied at the supermarket and the “basket of fried locusts” at a nearby restaurant — was a source of protein dating back to pre-Hispanic times.

 

When our cooking class was over I saw a flicker of regret in his face, as though he sensed the world’s infinite variety and possibilities in all the dishes he didn’t learn to cook. “Mom”, he said plaintively, surveying the sensual offerings of the table. “Can we make everything when we get home?”

13.

Gabe is supposed to represent the Emeril generation because he

 

1) is fond of criticizing others.

2) feels happy being alone.

3) is interested in cooking.

4) is good at making jokes.


A Gifted Cook

If there is a gene for cuisine, Gabe, my 11-year-old son, could splice it to perfection. Somewhere between Greenwich Village, where he was born, and the San Francisco Bay area, where he has grown up, the little kid with the stubborn disposition and freckles on his nose has forsaken Boy Scouts and baseball in favor of wielding a kitchen knife.

 

I suppose he is a member of the Emeril generation. Gabe has spent his formative years shopping at the Berkeley Bowl, where over half a dozen varieties of Thanksgiving yams, in lesser mortals, can instill emotional paralysis. He is blessed with a critical eye. “I think Emeril is really cheesy,” he observed the other night while watching a puff pastry segment. “He makes the stupidest jokes. But he cooks really well.”

 

With its manifold indigenous cultures, Oaxaca seemed the perfect place to push boundaries. Like the mole sauces for which it is justly famous, the region itself is a subtle blend of ingredients — from dusty Zapotec villages where Spanish is a second language to the zocalo in colonial Oaxaca, a sophisticated town square brimming with street life and vendors selling twisty, one-story-tall balloons.

 

Appealing to Gabe’s inner Iron Chef seemed like an indirect way to introduce him to a place where the artful approach to life presides. There was also a selfish motive: Gabe is my soul mate, a fellow food wanderer who is not above embracing insanity to follow his appetite wherever it leads.

 

Months ahead of time, we enrolled via the Internet in the daylong Wednesday cooking class at Seasons of My Heart, the chef and cookbook author Susana Trilling’s cooking school in the Elta Valley, about a 45-minute drive north to town. In her cookbook and PBS series of the same name, Ms. Trilling, an American whose maternal grandparents were Mexican, calls Oaxaca “the land of no waste” where cooking techniques in some ancient villages have endured for a thousand years.

 

I suspected that the very notion of what constitutes food in Oaxaca would test Gabe’s mettle. At the suggestion of Jacob, his older brother, we spent our second night in Mexico at a Oaxaca Guerrero baseball game, where instead of peanuts and Cracker Jack, vendors hawked huge trays piled high with chapulines, fried grasshoppers cooked in chili and lime, a local delicacy. Gabe was bug-eyed as he watched the man next to him snack on exoskeletal munchies in a paper bowl. “It’s probably less gross than a hot dog,” he admitted. “But on the rim of the bowl I saw a bunch of legs and served body parts. That’s revolting!”

 

Our cooking day began at the Wednesday market in Etla, shopping for ingredients and sampling as we went. On the way in the van, Gabe had made friends with Cindy and Fred Beams, fellow classmates from Boston, sharing opinions about Caesar salad and bemoaning his brother’s preference for plain pizza instead of Hawaiian. Cindy told Gabe about a delicious sauce she’d just had on her omelet at her В & В. “It was the best sauce — to die for,” she said. “Then I found out the provenance. Roasted worms.”

 

The Oaxacan taste for insects, we’d learn — including the worm salt spied at the supermarket and the “basket of fried locusts” at a nearby restaurant — was a source of protein dating back to pre-Hispanic times.

 

When our cooking class was over I saw a flicker of regret in his face, as though he sensed the world’s infinite variety and possibilities in all the dishes he didn’t learn to cook. “Mom”, he said plaintively, surveying the sensual offerings of the table. “Can we make everything when we get home?”

14.

The narrator wanted to take Gabe to Oaxaca because

 

1) he could speak Spanish.

2) there are a lot of entertainments for children there.

3) he knew a lot about local cultures.

4) he was the best to keep her company.


A Gifted Cook

If there is a gene for cuisine, Gabe, my 11-year-old son, could splice it to perfection. Somewhere between Greenwich Village, where he was born, and the San Francisco Bay area, where he has grown up, the little kid with the stubborn disposition and freckles on his nose has forsaken Boy Scouts and baseball in favor of wielding a kitchen knife.

 

I suppose he is a member of the Emeril generation. Gabe has spent his formative years shopping at the Berkeley Bowl, where over half a dozen varieties of Thanksgiving yams, in lesser mortals, can instill emotional paralysis. He is blessed with a critical eye. “I think Emeril is really cheesy,” he observed the other night while watching a puff pastry segment. “He makes the stupidest jokes. But he cooks really well.”

 

With its manifold indigenous cultures, Oaxaca seemed the perfect place to push boundaries. Like the mole sauces for which it is justly famous, the region itself is a subtle blend of ingredients — from dusty Zapotec villages where Spanish is a second language to the zocalo in colonial Oaxaca, a sophisticated town square brimming with street life and vendors selling twisty, one-story-tall balloons.

 

Appealing to Gabe’s inner Iron Chef seemed like an indirect way to introduce him to a place where the artful approach to life presides. There was also a selfish motive: Gabe is my soul mate, a fellow food wanderer who is not above embracing insanity to follow his appetite wherever it leads.

 

Months ahead of time, we enrolled via the Internet in the daylong Wednesday cooking class at Seasons of My Heart, the chef and cookbook author Susana Trilling’s cooking school in the Elta Valley, about a 45-minute drive north to town. In her cookbook and PBS series of the same name, Ms. Trilling, an American whose maternal grandparents were Mexican, calls Oaxaca “the land of no waste” where cooking techniques in some ancient villages have endured for a thousand years.

 

I suspected that the very notion of what constitutes food in Oaxaca would test Gabe’s mettle. At the suggestion of Jacob, his older brother, we spent our second night in Mexico at a Oaxaca Guerrero baseball game, where instead of peanuts and Cracker Jack, vendors hawked huge trays piled high with chapulines, fried grasshoppers cooked in chili and lime, a local delicacy. Gabe was bug-eyed as he watched the man next to him snack on exoskeletal munchies in a paper bowl. “It’s probably less gross than a hot dog,” he admitted. “But on the rim of the bowl I saw a bunch of legs and served body parts. That’s revolting!”

 

Our cooking day began at the Wednesday market in Etla, shopping for ingredients and sampling as we went. On the way in the van, Gabe had made friends with Cindy and Fred Beams, fellow classmates from Boston, sharing opinions about Caesar salad and bemoaning his brother’s preference for plain pizza instead of Hawaiian. Cindy told Gabe about a delicious sauce she’d just had on her omelet at her В & В. “It was the best sauce — to die for,” she said. “Then I found out the provenance. Roasted worms.”

 

The Oaxacan taste for insects, we’d learn — including the worm salt spied at the supermarket and the “basket of fried locusts” at a nearby restaurant — was a source of protein dating back to pre-Hispanic times.

 

When our cooking class was over I saw a flicker of regret in his face, as though he sensed the world’s infinite variety and possibilities in all the dishes he didn’t learn to cook. “Mom”, he said plaintively, surveying the sensual offerings of the table. “Can we make everything when we get home?”

15.

Gabe was struck when he

 

1) was told that local cooking techniques were a thousand years old.

2) saw the man next to him eat insects.

3) did not find any dish to satisfy his appetite.

4) understood that a hot dog was less gross than a local delicacy.


A Gifted Cook

If there is a gene for cuisine, Gabe, my 11-year-old son, could splice it to perfection. Somewhere between Greenwich Village, where he was born, and the San Francisco Bay area, where he has grown up, the little kid with the stubborn disposition and freckles on his nose has forsaken Boy Scouts and baseball in favor of wielding a kitchen knife.

 

I suppose he is a member of the Emeril generation. Gabe has spent his formative years shopping at the Berkeley Bowl, where over half a dozen varieties of Thanksgiving yams, in lesser mortals, can instill emotional paralysis. He is blessed with a critical eye. “I think Emeril is really cheesy,” he observed the other night while watching a puff pastry segment. “He makes the stupidest jokes. But he cooks really well.”

 

With its manifold indigenous cultures, Oaxaca seemed the perfect place to push boundaries. Like the mole sauces for which it is justly famous, the region itself is a subtle blend of ingredients — from dusty Zapotec villages where Spanish is a second language to the zocalo in colonial Oaxaca, a sophisticated town square brimming with street life and vendors selling twisty, one-story-tall balloons.

 

Appealing to Gabe’s inner Iron Chef seemed like an indirect way to introduce him to a place where the artful approach to life presides. There was also a selfish motive: Gabe is my soul mate, a fellow food wanderer who is not above embracing insanity to follow his appetite wherever it leads.

 

Months ahead of time, we enrolled via the Internet in the daylong Wednesday cooking class at Seasons of My Heart, the chef and cookbook author Susana Trilling’s cooking school in the Elta Valley, about a 45-minute drive north to town. In her cookbook and PBS series of the same name, Ms. Trilling, an American whose maternal grandparents were Mexican, calls Oaxaca “the land of no waste” where cooking techniques in some ancient villages have endured for a thousand years.

 

I suspected that the very notion of what constitutes food in Oaxaca would test Gabe’s mettle. At the suggestion of Jacob, his older brother, we spent our second night in Mexico at a Oaxaca Guerrero baseball game, where instead of peanuts and Cracker Jack, vendors hawked huge trays piled high with chapulines, fried grasshoppers cooked in chili and lime, a local delicacy. Gabe was bug-eyed as he watched the man next to him snack on exoskeletal munchies in a paper bowl. “It’s probably less gross than a hot dog,” he admitted. “But on the rim of the bowl I saw a bunch of legs and served body parts. That’s revolting!”

 

Our cooking day began at the Wednesday market in Etla, shopping for ingredients and sampling as we went. On the way in the van, Gabe had made friends with Cindy and Fred Beams, fellow classmates from Boston, sharing opinions about Caesar salad and bemoaning his brother’s preference for plain pizza instead of Hawaiian. Cindy told Gabe about a delicious sauce she’d just had on her omelet at her В & В. “It was the best sauce — to die for,” she said. “Then I found out the provenance. Roasted worms.”

 

The Oaxacan taste for insects, we’d learn — including the worm salt spied at the supermarket and the “basket of fried locusts” at a nearby restaurant — was a source of protein dating back to pre-Hispanic times.

 

When our cooking class was over I saw a flicker of regret in his face, as though he sensed the world’s infinite variety and possibilities in all the dishes he didn’t learn to cook. “Mom”, he said plaintively, surveying the sensual offerings of the table. “Can we make everything when we get home?”

16.

The Oaxacan people eat insects because this kind of food

 

1) tastes pleasant.

2) is easy to cook.

3) contains an essential nutritional element.

4) helps to cure many diseases.


A Gifted Cook

If there is a gene for cuisine, Gabe, my 11-year-old son, could splice it to perfection. Somewhere between Greenwich Village, where he was born, and the San Francisco Bay area, where he has grown up, the little kid with the stubborn disposition and freckles on his nose has forsaken Boy Scouts and baseball in favor of wielding a kitchen knife.

 

I suppose he is a member of the Emeril generation. Gabe has spent his formative years shopping at the Berkeley Bowl, where over half a dozen varieties of Thanksgiving yams, in lesser mortals, can instill emotional paralysis. He is blessed with a critical eye. “I think Emeril is really cheesy,” he observed the other night while watching a puff pastry segment. “He makes the stupidest jokes. But he cooks really well.”

 

With its manifold indigenous cultures, Oaxaca seemed the perfect place to push boundaries. Like the mole sauces for which it is justly famous, the region itself is a subtle blend of ingredients — from dusty Zapotec villages where Spanish is a second language to the zocalo in colonial Oaxaca, a sophisticated town square brimming with street life and vendors selling twisty, one-story-tall balloons.

 

Appealing to Gabe’s inner Iron Chef seemed like an indirect way to introduce him to a place where the artful approach to life presides. There was also a selfish motive: Gabe is my soul mate, a fellow food wanderer who is not above embracing insanity to follow his appetite wherever it leads.

 

Months ahead of time, we enrolled via the Internet in the daylong Wednesday cooking class at Seasons of My Heart, the chef and cookbook author Susana Trilling’s cooking school in the Elta Valley, about a 45-minute drive north to town. In her cookbook and PBS series of the same name, Ms. Trilling, an American whose maternal grandparents were Mexican, calls Oaxaca “the land of no waste” where cooking techniques in some ancient villages have endured for a thousand years.

 

I suspected that the very notion of what constitutes food in Oaxaca would test Gabe’s mettle. At the suggestion of Jacob, his older brother, we spent our second night in Mexico at a Oaxaca Guerrero baseball game, where instead of peanuts and Cracker Jack, vendors hawked huge trays piled high with chapulines, fried grasshoppers cooked in chili and lime, a local delicacy. Gabe was bug-eyed as he watched the man next to him snack on exoskeletal munchies in a paper bowl. “It’s probably less gross than a hot dog,” he admitted. “But on the rim of the bowl I saw a bunch of legs and served body parts. That’s revolting!”

 

Our cooking day began at the Wednesday market in Etla, shopping for ingredients and sampling as we went. On the way in the van, Gabe had made friends with Cindy and Fred Beams, fellow classmates from Boston, sharing opinions about Caesar salad and bemoaning his brother’s preference for plain pizza instead of Hawaiian. Cindy told Gabe about a delicious sauce she’d just had on her omelet at her В & В. “It was the best sauce — to die for,” she said. “Then I found out the provenance. Roasted worms.”

 

The Oaxacan taste for insects, we’d learn — including the worm salt spied at the supermarket and the “basket of fried locusts” at a nearby restaurant — was a source of protein dating back to pre-Hispanic times.

 

When our cooking class was over I saw a flicker of regret in his face, as though he sensed the world’s infinite variety and possibilities in all the dishes he didn’t learn to cook. “Mom”, he said plaintively, surveying the sensual offerings of the table. “Can we make everything when we get home?”

17.

At the end of the class Gabe felt regret because

 

1) there were a lot of dishes he could not make on his own.

2) the dishes he made were not tasty.

3) he did not want to go back home.

4) he had not managed to master all the dishes he liked.


A Gifted Cook

If there is a gene for cuisine, Gabe, my 11-year-old son, could splice it to perfection. Somewhere between Greenwich Village, where he was born, and the San Francisco Bay area, where he has grown up, the little kid with the stubborn disposition and freckles on his nose has forsaken Boy Scouts and baseball in favor of wielding a kitchen knife.

 

I suppose he is a member of the Emeril generation. Gabe has spent his formative years shopping at the Berkeley Bowl, where over half a dozen varieties of Thanksgiving yams, in lesser mortals, can instill emotional paralysis. He is blessed with a critical eye. “I think Emeril is really cheesy,” he observed the other night while watching a puff pastry segment. “He makes the stupidest jokes. But he cooks really well.”

 

With its manifold indigenous cultures, Oaxaca seemed the perfect place to push boundaries. Like the mole sauces for which it is justly famous, the region itself is a subtle blend of ingredients — from dusty Zapotec villages where Spanish is a second language to the zocalo in colonial Oaxaca, a sophisticated town square brimming with street life and vendors selling twisty, one-story-tall balloons.

 

Appealing to Gabe’s inner Iron Chef seemed like an indirect way to introduce him to a place where the artful approach to life presides. There was also a selfish motive: Gabe is my soul mate, a fellow food wanderer who is not above embracing insanity to follow his appetite wherever it leads.

 

Months ahead of time, we enrolled via the Internet in the daylong Wednesday cooking class at Seasons of My Heart, the chef and cookbook author Susana Trilling’s cooking school in the Elta Valley, about a 45-minute drive north to town. In her cookbook and PBS series of the same name, Ms. Trilling, an American whose maternal grandparents were Mexican, calls Oaxaca “the land of no waste” where cooking techniques in some ancient villages have endured for a thousand years.

 

I suspected that the very notion of what constitutes food in Oaxaca would test Gabe’s mettle. At the suggestion of Jacob, his older brother, we spent our second night in Mexico at a Oaxaca Guerrero baseball game, where instead of peanuts and Cracker Jack, vendors hawked huge trays piled high with chapulines, fried grasshoppers cooked in chili and lime, a local delicacy. Gabe was bug-eyed as he watched the man next to him snack on exoskeletal munchies in a paper bowl. “It’s probably less gross than a hot dog,” he admitted. “But on the rim of the bowl I saw a bunch of legs and served body parts. That’s revolting!”

 

Our cooking day began at the Wednesday market in Etla, shopping for ingredients and sampling as we went. On the way in the van, Gabe had made friends with Cindy and Fred Beams, fellow classmates from Boston, sharing opinions about Caesar salad and bemoaning his brother’s preference for plain pizza instead of Hawaiian. Cindy told Gabe about a delicious sauce she’d just had on her omelet at her В & В. “It was the best sauce — to die for,” she said. “Then I found out the provenance. Roasted worms.”

 

The Oaxacan taste for insects, we’d learn — including the worm salt spied at the supermarket and the “basket of fried locusts” at a nearby restaurant — was a source of protein dating back to pre-Hispanic times.

 

When our cooking class was over I saw a flicker of regret in his face, as though he sensed the world’s infinite variety and possibilities in all the dishes he didn’t learn to cook. “Mom”, he said plaintively, surveying the sensual offerings of the table. “Can we make everything when we get home?”

18.

paragraph 3 “brimming with” means

 

1) lacking.

2) being filled with.

3) astonishing with.

4) beckoning with.


A Gifted Cook

If there is a gene for cuisine, Gabe, my 11-year-old son, could splice it to perfection. Somewhere between Greenwich Village, where he was born, and the San Francisco Bay area, where he has grown up, the little kid with the stubborn disposition and freckles on his nose has forsaken Boy Scouts and baseball in favor of wielding a kitchen knife.

 

I suppose he is a member of the Emeril generation. Gabe has spent his formative years shopping at the Berkeley Bowl, where over half a dozen varieties of Thanksgiving yams, in lesser mortals, can instill emotional paralysis. He is blessed with a critical eye. “I think Emeril is really cheesy,” he observed the other night while watching a puff pastry segment. “He makes the stupidest jokes. But he cooks really well.”

 

With its manifold indigenous cultures, Oaxaca seemed the perfect place to push boundaries. Like the mole sauces for which it is justly famous, the region itself is a subtle blend of ingredients — from dusty Zapotec villages where Spanish is a second language to the zocalo in colonial Oaxaca, a sophisticated town square brimming with street life and vendors selling twisty, one-story-tall balloons.

 

Appealing to Gabe’s inner Iron Chef seemed like an indirect way to introduce him to a place where the artful approach to life presides. There was also a selfish motive: Gabe is my soul mate, a fellow food wanderer who is not above embracing insanity to follow his appetite wherever it leads.

 

Months ahead of time, we enrolled via the Internet in the daylong Wednesday cooking class at Seasons of My Heart, the chef and cookbook author Susana Trilling’s cooking school in the Elta Valley, about a 45-minute drive north to town. In her cookbook and PBS series of the same name, Ms. Trilling, an American whose maternal grandparents were Mexican, calls Oaxaca “the land of no waste” where cooking techniques in some ancient villages have endured for a thousand years.

 

I suspected that the very notion of what constitutes food in Oaxaca would test Gabe’s mettle. At the suggestion of Jacob, his older brother, we spent our second night in Mexico at a Oaxaca Guerrero baseball game, where instead of peanuts and Cracker Jack, vendors hawked huge trays piled high with chapulines, fried grasshoppers cooked in chili and lime, a local delicacy. Gabe was bug-eyed as he watched the man next to him snack on exoskeletal munchies in a paper bowl. “It’s probably less gross than a hot dog,” he admitted. “But on the rim of the bowl I saw a bunch of legs and served body parts. That’s revolting!”

 

Our cooking day began at the Wednesday market in Etla, shopping for ingredients and sampling as we went. On the way in the van, Gabe had made friends with Cindy and Fred Beams, fellow classmates from Boston, sharing opinions about Caesar salad and bemoaning his brother’s preference for plain pizza instead of Hawaiian. Cindy told Gabe about a delicious sauce she’d just had on her omelet at her В & В. “It was the best sauce — to die for,” she said. “Then I found out the provenance. Roasted worms.”

 

The Oaxacan taste for insects, we’d learn — including the worm salt spied at the supermarket and the “basket of fried locusts” at a nearby restaurant — was a source of protein dating back to pre-Hispanic times.

 

When our cooking class was over I saw a flicker of regret in his face, as though he sensed the world’s infinite variety and possibilities in all the dishes he didn’t learn to cook. “Mom”, he said plaintively, surveying the sensual offerings of the table. “Can we make everything when we get home?”

19.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово CALL так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

SPORTS DAY

 

Our school used to have a ritual day of torture, embarrassment and humiliation for the less athletic pupils at the school. It ______ Sports Day.

20.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово FIT так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

There were many spectators: parents, teachers and classmates were all there to cheer and applaud the ______ , fastest and most successful athletes in the school.

21.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово GOOD так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

For useless athletes like me, these were the worst days of our school lives. However, I eventually developed a strategy that made it a little ______ . I took up throwing the hammer.

22.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово THREE так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Amazingly I became quite good at it. Finally, on my last Sports Day — two days before my last ever school day — I came ______ in the Hammer Throw, stood on a podium and was presented with a bronze medal!

23.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово THEY так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

 

International Summer School Cultural Programme

 

Even if you come to our Summer school only to study English, your visit to the UK would not be complete without a trip to London. Our students will have time to see the sights and absorb the atmosphere as they spend ______ last night in this fabulous city.

24.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово VISIT так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

All our students enjoy two day trips each week, ______ cultural sites as well as much more cheerful attractions. All of the trips last a full day, so there is plenty of time for the students to experience everything.

25.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово NOT INCLUDE так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

We also offer a wide range of fun activities with our English PLUS program, but these ______ in the basic course price, but can be a great way to learn new skills while practicing English.

26.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова COUNT од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

 

Animals

 

The importance of animals in British life is reflected in many ways. In the past, landowners liked to be portrayed with their dogs and horses. ______ pictures of this kind can be seen in art galleries and private residences.

27.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова WIDE од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Animals are ______ used in advertising in magazines and on television.

28.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова PREVENT од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

The Royal Society for the ______ of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) is one of the largest charities in Britain.

29.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова MOVE од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

RSPCA is a part of a more general ______ in support of animal rights that has emerged recently in Britain and the USA.

30.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова VARY од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Animal rights organizations use ______ tactics: picketing stores that sell furs, harassing hunters in the wild, or breaking into laboratories to free animals.

31.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова OWN од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Their main aim is to ban the cruel treatment and killing of animals both in laboratory experiments and in factory farming. The irresponsible and neglectful treatment of animals by some zoo and pet ______ is also their concern.

32.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) scare

2) disturb

3) worry

4) fear


Busy Day

Let me tell you what happened once when my dear Uncle Podger decided to hang a picture on the wall. He told us not to 32 ______ and just watch him do it. He said he would do it by himself. Well, he came up to the picture which was waiting to be put up in the dining room and took it. But suddenly it fell down and the glass 33 ______ into pieces and he cut his finger. He started to 34 ______ his handker chief but couldn’t find it because he had put it in his coat and none of us knew where his coat was.

 

‘Six of you!’ Uncle Podger exclaimed, ‘and you cannot find the coat that I put down only five minutes ago!’ But then he got up from his chair and found that he had been sitting on his coat the whole time. ‘Oh, you can stop your 35 ______ . I’ve found it myself!’

 

Then after an hour was spent in tying up his finger Uncle Podger wondered where the hammer had disappeared to. And while everybody was trying to get the hammer he was standing on the chair saying: ‘Well, I want to know if you are going to 36 ______ me here all evening!’

 

Finally the hammer was found, but we noticed that the nail which he had prepared was lost. And, of course, Uncle Podger didn’t keep 37 ______ while he was waiting for another nail to be brought. We heard all he had to say about our habit of losing all the things he needed.

 

When the picture was hanging on the wall at last, everybody looked very 38 ______ , all except Uncle Podg er, who was lively as ever. Aunt Maria remarked that if Uncle Podger wanted to do a job like that again, she would spend a week with her mother until it was over.

33.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) failed

2) broke

3) ruined

4) fell


Busy Day

Let me tell you what happened once when my dear Uncle Podger decided to hang a picture on the wall. He told us not to 32 ______ and just watch him do it. He said he would do it by himself. Well, he came up to the picture which was waiting to be put up in the dining room and took it. But suddenly it fell down and the glass 33 ______ into pieces and he cut his finger. He started to 34 ______ his handker chief but couldn’t find it because he had put it in his coat and none of us knew where his coat was.

 

‘Six of you!’ Uncle Podger exclaimed, ‘and you cannot find the coat that I put down only five minutes ago!’ But then he got up from his chair and found that he had been sitting on his coat the whole time. ‘Oh, you can stop your 35 ______ . I’ve found it myself!’

 

Then after an hour was spent in tying up his finger Uncle Podger wondered where the hammer had disappeared to. And while everybody was trying to get the hammer he was standing on the chair saying: ‘Well, I want to know if you are going to 36 ______ me here all evening!’

 

Finally the hammer was found, but we noticed that the nail which he had prepared was lost. And, of course, Uncle Podger didn’t keep 37 ______ while he was waiting for another nail to be brought. We heard all he had to say about our habit of losing all the things he needed.

 

When the picture was hanging on the wall at last, everybody looked very 38 ______ , all except Uncle Podg er, who was lively as ever. Aunt Maria remarked that if Uncle Podger wanted to do a job like that again, she would spend a week with her mother until it was over.

34.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) look at

2) look to

3) look after

4) look for


Busy Day

Let me tell you what happened once when my dear Uncle Podger decided to hang a picture on the wall. He told us not to 32 ______ and just watch him do it. He said he would do it by himself. Well, he came up to the picture which was waiting to be put up in the dining room and took it. But suddenly it fell down and the glass 33 ______ into pieces and he cut his finger. He started to 34 ______ his handker chief but couldn’t find it because he had put it in his coat and none of us knew where his coat was.

 

‘Six of you!’ Uncle Podger exclaimed, ‘and you cannot find the coat that I put down only five minutes ago!’ But then he got up from his chair and found that he had been sitting on his coat the whole time. ‘Oh, you can stop your 35 ______ . I’ve found it myself!’

 

Then after an hour was spent in tying up his finger Uncle Podger wondered where the hammer had disappeared to. And while everybody was trying to get the hammer he was standing on the chair saying: ‘Well, I want to know if you are going to 36 ______ me here all evening!’

 

Finally the hammer was found, but we noticed that the nail which he had prepared was lost. And, of course, Uncle Podger didn’t keep 37 ______ while he was waiting for another nail to be brought. We heard all he had to say about our habit of losing all the things he needed.

 

When the picture was hanging on the wall at last, everybody looked very 38 ______ , all except Uncle Podg er, who was lively as ever. Aunt Maria remarked that if Uncle Podger wanted to do a job like that again, she would spend a week with her mother until it was over.

35.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) search

2) investigation

3) exploration

4) study


Busy Day

Let me tell you what happened once when my dear Uncle Podger decided to hang a picture on the wall. He told us not to 32 ______ and just watch him do it. He said he would do it by himself. Well, he came up to the picture which was waiting to be put up in the dining room and took it. But suddenly it fell down and the glass 33 ______ into pieces and he cut his finger. He started to 34 ______ his handker chief but couldn’t find it because he had put it in his coat and none of us knew where his coat was.

 

‘Six of you!’ Uncle Podger exclaimed, ‘and you cannot find the coat that I put down only five minutes ago!’ But then he got up from his chair and found that he had been sitting on his coat the whole time. ‘Oh, you can stop your 35 ______ . I’ve found it myself!’

 

Then after an hour was spent in tying up his finger Uncle Podger wondered where the hammer had disappeared to. And while everybody was trying to get the hammer he was standing on the chair saying: ‘Well, I want to know if you are going to 36 ______ me here all evening!’

 

Finally the hammer was found, but we noticed that the nail which he had prepared was lost. And, of course, Uncle Podger didn’t keep 37 ______ while he was waiting for another nail to be brought. We heard all he had to say about our habit of losing all the things he needed.

 

When the picture was hanging on the wall at last, everybody looked very 38 ______ , all except Uncle Podg er, who was lively as ever. Aunt Maria remarked that if Uncle Podger wanted to do a job like that again, she would spend a week with her mother until it was over.

36.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) stay

2) keep

3) put

4) take


Busy Day

Let me tell you what happened once when my dear Uncle Podger decided to hang a picture on the wall. He told us not to 32 ______ and just watch him do it. He said he would do it by himself. Well, he came up to the picture which was waiting to be put up in the dining room and took it. But suddenly it fell down and the glass 33 ______ into pieces and he cut his finger. He started to 34 ______ his handker chief but couldn’t find it because he had put it in his coat and none of us knew where his coat was.

 

‘Six of you!’ Uncle Podger exclaimed, ‘and you cannot find the coat that I put down only five minutes ago!’ But then he got up from his chair and found that he had been sitting on his coat the whole time. ‘Oh, you can stop your 35 ______ . I’ve found it myself!’

 

Then after an hour was spent in tying up his finger Uncle Podger wondered where the hammer had disappeared to. And while everybody was trying to get the hammer he was standing on the chair saying: ‘Well, I want to know if you are going to 36 ______ me here all evening!’

 

Finally the hammer was found, but we noticed that the nail which he had prepared was lost. And, of course, Uncle Podger didn’t keep 37 ______ while he was waiting for another nail to be brought. We heard all he had to say about our habit of losing all the things he needed.

 

When the picture was hanging on the wall at last, everybody looked very 38 ______ , all except Uncle Podg er, who was lively as ever. Aunt Maria remarked that if Uncle Podger wanted to do a job like that again, she would spend a week with her mother until it was over.

37.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) dumb

2) cool

3) still

4) silent


Busy Day

Let me tell you what happened once when my dear Uncle Podger decided to hang a picture on the wall. He told us not to 32 ______ and just watch him do it. He said he would do it by himself. Well, he came up to the picture which was waiting to be put up in the dining room and took it. But suddenly it fell down and the glass 33 ______ into pieces and he cut his finger. He started to 34 ______ his handker chief but couldn’t find it because he had put it in his coat and none of us knew where his coat was.

 

‘Six of you!’ Uncle Podger exclaimed, ‘and you cannot find the coat that I put down only five minutes ago!’ But then he got up from his chair and found that he had been sitting on his coat the whole time. ‘Oh, you can stop your 35 ______ . I’ve found it myself!’

 

Then after an hour was spent in tying up his finger Uncle Podger wondered where the hammer had disappeared to. And while everybody was trying to get the hammer he was standing on the chair saying: ‘Well, I want to know if you are going to 36 ______ me here all evening!’

 

Finally the hammer was found, but we noticed that the nail which he had prepared was lost. And, of course, Uncle Podger didn’t keep 37 ______ while he was waiting for another nail to be brought. We heard all he had to say about our habit of losing all the things he needed.

 

When the picture was hanging on the wall at last, everybody looked very 38 ______ , all except Uncle Podg er, who was lively as ever. Aunt Maria remarked that if Uncle Podger wanted to do a job like that again, she would spend a week with her mother until it was over.

38.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) dull

2) tired

3) angry

4) boring


Busy Day

Let me tell you what happened once when my dear Uncle Podger decided to hang a picture on the wall. He told us not to 32 ______ and just watch him do it. He said he would do it by himself. Well, he came up to the picture which was waiting to be put up in the dining room and took it. But suddenly it fell down and the glass 33 ______ into pieces and he cut his finger. He started to 34 ______ his handker chief but couldn’t find it because he had put it in his coat and none of us knew where his coat was.

 

‘Six of you!’ Uncle Podger exclaimed, ‘and you cannot find the coat that I put down only five minutes ago!’ But then he got up from his chair and found that he had been sitting on his coat the whole time. ‘Oh, you can stop your 35 ______ . I’ve found it myself!’

 

Then after an hour was spent in tying up his finger Uncle Podger wondered where the hammer had disappeared to. And while everybody was trying to get the hammer he was standing on the chair saying: ‘Well, I want to know if you are going to 36 ______ me here all evening!’

 

Finally the hammer was found, but we noticed that the nail which he had prepared was lost. And, of course, Uncle Podger didn’t keep 37 ______ while he was waiting for another nail to be brought. We heard all he had to say about our habit of losing all the things he needed.

 

When the picture was hanging on the wall at last, everybody looked very 38 ______ , all except Uncle Podg er, who was lively as ever. Aunt Maria remarked that if Uncle Podger wanted to do a job like that again, she would spend a week with her mother until it was over.

39.

You have received a letter from your English-speaking pen-friend Tom who writes:

 

... In our city we have an annual competition for teenagers who make their own short films. This year I got the second prize for a film about my grandparents. Do you think it’s important to record family history? Who do you think should do it? How can it be done best?

This month is my mom’s birthday and now I am thinking about a gift for her.

I want it to be very special...

 

Write a letter to Tom. In your letter answer his questions, ask 3 questions about his mom. Write 100—140 words. Remember the rules of letter writing. You have 20 minutes to do this task.

40.

Выберите только ОДНО из двух предложенных высказываний и выразите своё мнение по предложенной проблеме согласно данному плану.

 

Comment on one of the following statements.

 

1. Exams motivate students to study harder.

2. Some parents think that if there is a computer at home their children will waste much of their time on videogames and social networking.

 

What is your opinion? Do you agree with this statement? Write 200–250 words. Use the following plan:

− make an introduction (state the problem)

− express your personal opinion and give 2–3 reasons for your opinion

− express an opposing opinion and give 1–2 reasons for this opposing opinion

− explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion

− make a conclusion restating your position

41.

Imagine that you are preparing a project with your friend. You have found some interesting material for the presentation and you want to read this text to your friend. You have 1.5 minutes to read the text silently, then be ready to read it out aloud. You will not have more than 1.5 minutes to read it.

 

Despite its status as a proverbial fact, a goldfish’s memory isn’t a few seconds long. Research demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt that goldfish have a memory-span of at least three months and can distinguish between different shapes, colours and sounds. They were trained to push a lever to earn a food reward; when the lever was fixed to work only for an hour a day, the fish soon learned to activate it at the correct time. A number of similar studies have shown that farmed fish can easily be trained to feed at particular times and places in response to an audible signal.

Goldfish don’t swim into the side of the bowl, not because they can see it, but because they are using a pressure-sensing system called the lateral line. Certain species of blind cave fish are able to navigate perfectly well in their lightless environment by using their lateral line system alone.

42.

Study the advertisement.

 

 

You are considering using car washing services and you'd like to get more information. In 1.5 minutes you are to ask five direct questions to find out the following:

1) working hours

2) if they have a discount card

3) recommendations

4) number of clients per day

5) time they need to wash the car

You have 20 seconds to ask each question.

43.

These are photos from your photo album. Choose one photo to describe to your friend.

 

 

You will have to start speaking in 1.5 minutes and will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). In your talk remember to speak about:

 

• where and when the photo was taken

• what/who is in the photo

• what is happening

• why you keep the photo in your album

• why you decided to show the picture to your friend

 

You have to talk continuously, starting with: "I’ve chosen photo number … ".

44.

Study the two photographs. In 1.5 minutes be ready to compare and contrast the photographs:

 

• give a brief description of the photos (action, location)

• say what the pictures have in common

• say in what way the pictures are different

• say what kind of sleep presented in the photos you'd prefer

• explain why

 

You will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). You have to talk continuously.