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Вариант № 983641

1.

Вы услышите 6 высказываний. Установите соответствие между высказываниями каждого говорящего A–F и утверждениями, данными в списке 1–7. Используйте каждое утверждение, обозначенное соответствующей цифрой, только один раз. В задании есть одно лишнее утверждение. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

1. Knowing German offers you more career opportunities.

2. German isn’t as difficult as you may think.

3. You can’t learn the German language quickly.

4. Writers, philosophers and scientists need to learn German.

5. I learn German because I’m attracted by the culture.

6. Some unique academic books exist only in German.

7. German is almost an impossible language to learn.

 

ГоворящийABCDEF
Утверждение

2.

Вы услышите диалог. Определите, какие из приведённых утверждений А–G соответствуют содержанию текста (1 – True), какие не соответствуют (2 – False) и о чём в тексте не сказано, то есть на основании текста нельзя дать ни положительного, ни отрицательного ответа (3 – Not stated). Занесите номер выбранного Вами варианта ответа в таблицу. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

A) The woman wants to find out details about ordering a special book for her son's birthday.

B) The birthday special includes a tour of the cinema.

C) The cinema provides food and drink but it costs extra.

D) It is NOT safe to leave things in the birthday room during the film.

E) You must pay for the birthday room before the day of the party.

F) The cinema is fully booked on the day of the boy’s birthday.

G) The woman is going to pay for the special online.

 

Запишите в ответ цифры, расположив их в порядке, соответствующем буквам:

ABCDEFG
       

3.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The Portobello Festival differs from festivals in Cannes and Venice as it

 

1) is running its second season only.

2) is not so fashionable and well-known.

3) does not attract celebrities.

4.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The festival was initially founded to

 

1) let independent filmmakers demonstrate their work.

2) help different filmmakers earn money.

3) advertise video equipment but not to show films.

5.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

According to the festival’s director they made the festival free because

 

1) they get enough money for placing advertisements.

2) there are no expensive prizes and launch parties.

3) sponsors and funds provide good financial support.

6.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

One characteristic feature of the Portobello Festival is that

 

1) 700 films are shown each festival season.

2) only short films are chosen for the festival annually.

3) student films are shown together with professionals’ works.

7.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The festival’s director believes that their films are

 

1) of better quality than TV films.

2) worthy to be shown on TV.

3) the world’s top hits.

8.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The famous filmmaker whose first film was shown at the festival is

 

1) John Malkovich.

2) Guy Ritchie.

3) Jonathan Barnett.

9.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Speaking about future plans, the festival’s director

 

1) thinks the festival will be united with Glastonbury or Edinburgh events.

2) believes the festival should turn to other arts mostly.

3) sounds optimistic about the festival extension.

10.

Установите соответствие между заголовками 1–8 и текстами A–G. Запишите свои ответы в таблицу. Используйте каждую цифру только один раз. В задании есть один лишний заголовок.

 

1. Places to stay in

2. Public transport

3. Cultural differences

4. Nightlife

5. Camping holidays

6. Contacts with neighbours

7. Different landscapes

8. Eating out

 

 

A. Sweden is a land of contrast, from the Danish influence of the southwest to the Laplanders wandering freely with their reindeer in the wild Arctic north. And while Sweden in cities is stylish and modern, the countryside offers many simpler pleasures for those who look for peace and calm. The land and its people have an air of reserved calm, and still the world’s best-selling pop group Abba, which used to attract crowds of hysterical fans, come from Sweden.

 

B. Historically, Sweden has an interesting story. Its dealings with the outside world began, in fact, during Viking times, when in addition to the well- known surprise attacks of the nearby lands, there was much trading around the Baltic, mostly in furs and weapons. Swedish connections with the other Scandinavian countries, Norway and Denmark, have been strong since the Middle Ages. The monarchies of all three are still closely linked.

 

C. Sweden’s scenery has a gentler charm than that of neighbouring Norway’s rocky coast. Much of Sweden is forested, and there are thousands lakes, notably large pools near the capital, Stockholm. The lakeside resort in the centre of Sweden is popular with Scandinavians, but most visitors prefer first the Baltic islands. The largest island, Gotland, with its ruined medieval churches, is a particular attraction.

 

D. Sweden boasts a good range of hotels, covering the full spectrum of prices and standards. Many of them offer discounts in summer and at weekends during the winter. In addition, working farms throughout Sweden offer accommodation, either in the main farmhouse or in a cottage nearby. Forest cabins and chalets are also available throughout the country, generally set in beautiful surroundings, near lakes, in quiet forest glades or on an island in some remote place.

 

E. Living in a tent or caravan with your family or friends at weekends and on holiday is extremely popular in Sweden and there is a fantastic variety of special places. Most are located on a lakeside or by the sea with free bathing facilities close at hand. There are over 600 campsites in the country. It is often possible to rent boats or bicycles, play mini-golf or tennis, ride a horse or relax in a sauna. It is also possible to camp in areas away from other houses.

 

F. Swedes like plain meals, simply prepared from the freshest ingredients. As a country with a sea coast and many freshwater lakes, fish dishes are found on all hotel or restaurant menus. Top-class restaurants in Sweden are usually fairly expensive, but even the smallest towns have reasonably priced self-service restaurants and grill bars. Many restaurants all over Sweden offer a special dish of the day at a reduced price that includes main course, salad, soft drink and coffee.

 

G. Stockholm has a variety of pubs, cafes, clubs, restaurants, cinemas and theatres but in the country evenings tend to be very calm and peaceful. From August to June the Royal Ballet performs in Stockholm. Music and theatre productions take place in many cities during the summer in the open air. Outside Stockholm in the 18th-century palace there are performances of 18th-century opera very popular with tourists.

 

 

 

ГоворящийABCDEFG
Утверждение

11.

Прочитайте текст и заполните пропуски A–F частями предложений, обозначенными цифрами 1–7. Одна из частей в списке 1–7 — лишняя. Занесите цифры, обозначающие соответствующие части предложений, в таблицу.

 

 

London Zoo

 

London Zoo is one of the most important zoos in the world. There are over 12,000 animals at London Zoo and A ______ ! Its main concern is to breed threatened animals in captivity. This means we might be able to restock the wild, should disaster ever befall the wild population.

Partula Snail, Red Crowned Crane, Arabian Oryx, Golden Lion Tamarin, Persian Leopard, Asiatic Lion and Sumatran Tiger are just some of the species London Zoo is helping to save.

That is why it is so important that we fight to preserve the habitats that these animals live in, as well as eliminate other dangers В ______ . But we aim to make your day at London Zoo a fun and memorable time, С ______ .

In the Ambika Paul Children’s Zoo, for instance, youngsters can learn a new love and appreciation for animals D ______ . They can also learn how to care for favourite pets in the Pet Care Centre.

Then there are numerous special Highlight events E ______ unforgettable pony rides to feeding times and spectacular animal displays. You will get to meet keepers and ask them what you are interested in about the animals they care for, F ______ .

Whatever you decide, you will have a great day. We have left no stone unturned to make sure you do!

 

1. such as hunting exotic animals and selling furs

2. as well as the ins and outs of being a keeper at London Zoo

3. which take place every day, from

4. because they see and touch them close up 

5. despite the serious side to our work

6. which demand much time and effort

7. that is not counting every ant in the colony

 

ПропускABCDEF
Часть предложения

12.

Dr. Gijbert Stoet claims that women do worse than men at maths because they ...

 

1) use improper methods in problem-solving.

2) are not encouraged to do the subject.

3) do not believe in their own competence.

4) employ wrong stereotypical techniques.


Women and the maths problem

 

Women's underachievement in maths may not be due to their poor self-image in the subject, a new report suggests. Researcher Dr. Gijsbert Stoet at the University of Leeds says that the so-called "stereotype threat" theory - which holds that women perform worse than men because they expect to do badly - "does not stand up to scrutiny".

 

Earlier research had serious flaws, he says, with improper use of statistical techniques and methodology. Clearly, those who carried out this research need to review their own competence in maths. Stoet believes the gender gap may simply be that men and women have different interests from an early age, and says the answer to getting more women into maths and engineering is probably a matter of motivation.

 

According to last year's results, even though girls perform as well as boys in their maths GCSEs, 60% of A-levels in the subject are taken by boys, who achieve 60% of grade As.

 

I am an engineer, who has worked in the chemical industry for most of my working career. When I graduated in the 80, I assumed we were at the start of a new era for women in science: I studied alongside intelligent and motivated women, opportunities seemed aplenty, in-roads had been made.

 

But 20 years down the line, only 8.7% of British engineers are women, the lowest proportion in Europe, compared with 25% in Sweden. So what has happened?

 

One of the main problems is that careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (known as Stem) are not sufficiently promoted in schools, with fewer children taking up these subjects at GCSE and A-level. Year in, year out, we are told that Britain has a skills shortage. The general lack of interest among schoolchildren in maths and science subjects, together with the underlying social conditioning that still remains - that science subjects "aren't really for girls" - has led to a double-whammy effect, reducing female entrants even further.

 

Over the past few years, I have been involved in Stemnet, an organization dedicated to promoting these careers by getting people who work in jobs from biologists to builders to talk to schoolchildren about what they do. It's an attempt to debunk the myth that maths and sciences are too difficult or too boring. I was amazed to see hundreds of schoolboys and girls at a recent event at the Science Museum, presenting a range of experiments and projects they had prepared. And the ones prepares by girls were equally challenging and sophisticated.

 

I agree with the new study that rather than focusing on the problems of stereotyping, we should devote more time to encouraging girls into science and technology: they clearly respond.

 

But encouraging schoolgirls into university and careers is not all. As is typical in most sectors, I see a number of female engineers at the entry and midlevels of companies, but precious few at the top. This is a huge waste of talent. It also raises the issue of certain professional inequality and a biased attitude towards women. The report has done well to challenge the myths behind women's underachievement in schools, but more work still needs to be done to address the problem of women's lack of achievement in the workplace. At least in the spheres closely related to science and engineering.

13.

Last year's A-levels maths results show that...

 

1) boys are more likely to fail.

2) more girls take the subject.

3) girls do better than boys.

4) boys get more A grades.


Women and the maths problem

 

Women's underachievement in maths may not be due to their poor self-image in the subject, a new report suggests. Researcher Dr. Gijsbert Stoet at the University of Leeds says that the so-called "stereotype threat" theory - which holds that women perform worse than men because they expect to do badly - "does not stand up to scrutiny".

 

Earlier research had serious flaws, he says, with improper use of statistical techniques and methodology. Clearly, those who carried out this research need to review their own competence in maths. Stoet believes the gender gap may simply be that men and women have different interests from an early age, and says the answer to getting more women into maths and engineering is probably a matter of motivation.

 

According to last year's results, even though girls perform as well as boys in their maths GCSEs, 60% of A-levels in the subject are taken by boys, who achieve 60% of grade As.

 

I am an engineer, who has worked in the chemical industry for most of my working career. When I graduated in the 80, I assumed we were at the start of a new era for women in science: I studied alongside intelligent and motivated women, opportunities seemed aplenty, in-roads had been made.

 

But 20 years down the line, only 8.7% of British engineers are women, the lowest proportion in Europe, compared with 25% in Sweden. So what has happened?

 

One of the main problems is that careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (known as Stem) are not sufficiently promoted in schools, with fewer children taking up these subjects at GCSE and A-level. Year in, year out, we are told that Britain has a skills shortage. The general lack of interest among schoolchildren in maths and science subjects, together with the underlying social conditioning that still remains - that science subjects "aren't really for girls" - has led to a double-whammy effect, reducing female entrants even further.

 

Over the past few years, I have been involved in Stemnet, an organization dedicated to promoting these careers by getting people who work in jobs from biologists to builders to talk to schoolchildren about what they do. It's an attempt to debunk the myth that maths and sciences are too difficult or too boring. I was amazed to see hundreds of schoolboys and girls at a recent event at the Science Museum, presenting a range of experiments and projects they had prepared. And the ones prepares by girls were equally challenging and sophisticated.

 

I agree with the new study that rather than focusing on the problems of stereotyping, we should devote more time to encouraging girls into science and technology: they clearly respond.

 

But encouraging schoolgirls into university and careers is not all. As is typical in most sectors, I see a number of female engineers at the entry and midlevels of companies, but precious few at the top. This is a huge waste of talent. It also raises the issue of certain professional inequality and a biased attitude towards women. The report has done well to challenge the myths behind women's underachievement in schools, but more work still needs to be done to address the problem of women's lack of achievement in the workplace. At least in the spheres closely related to science and engineering.

14.

Which of the following statements is NOT true, according to paragraphs 5 and 6?

 

1) Britain has fewer women engineers than other European countries.

2) The author has worked in engineering for over 20 years.

3) The prospects for women in science are best in Sweden.

4) The author's expectations about women in science have not come true.


Women and the maths problem

 

Women's underachievement in maths may not be due to their poor self-image in the subject, a new report suggests. Researcher Dr. Gijsbert Stoet at the University of Leeds says that the so-called "stereotype threat" theory - which holds that women perform worse than men because they expect to do badly - "does not stand up to scrutiny".

 

Earlier research had serious flaws, he says, with improper use of statistical techniques and methodology. Clearly, those who carried out this research need to review their own competence in maths. Stoet believes the gender gap may simply be that men and women have different interests from an early age, and says the answer to getting more women into maths and engineering is probably a matter of motivation.

 

According to last year's results, even though girls perform as well as boys in their maths GCSEs, 60% of A-levels in the subject are taken by boys, who achieve 60% of grade As.

 

I am an engineer, who has worked in the chemical industry for most of my working career. When I graduated in the 80, I assumed we were at the start of a new era for women in science: I studied alongside intelligent and motivated women, opportunities seemed aplenty, in-roads had been made.

 

But 20 years down the line, only 8.7% of British engineers are women, the lowest proportion in Europe, compared with 25% in Sweden. So what has happened?

 

One of the main problems is that careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (known as Stem) are not sufficiently promoted in schools, with fewer children taking up these subjects at GCSE and A-level. Year in, year out, we are told that Britain has a skills shortage. The general lack of interest among schoolchildren in maths and science subjects, together with the underlying social conditioning that still remains - that science subjects "aren't really for girls" - has led to a double-whammy effect, reducing female entrants even further.

 

Over the past few years, I have been involved in Stemnet, an organization dedicated to promoting these careers by getting people who work in jobs from biologists to builders to talk to schoolchildren about what they do. It's an attempt to debunk the myth that maths and sciences are too difficult or too boring. I was amazed to see hundreds of schoolboys and girls at a recent event at the Science Museum, presenting a range of experiments and projects they had prepared. And the ones prepares by girls were equally challenging and sophisticated.

 

I agree with the new study that rather than focusing on the problems of stereotyping, we should devote more time to encouraging girls into science and technology: they clearly respond.

 

But encouraging schoolgirls into university and careers is not all. As is typical in most sectors, I see a number of female engineers at the entry and midlevels of companies, but precious few at the top. This is a huge waste of talent. It also raises the issue of certain professional inequality and a biased attitude towards women. The report has done well to challenge the myths behind women's underachievement in schools, but more work still needs to be done to address the problem of women's lack of achievement in the workplace. At least in the spheres closely related to science and engineering.

15.

According to the author, social conditioning taking place in Britain implies that...

 

1) science could be interesting.

2) math is an optional skill.

3) boys are smarter than girls.

4) science is for boys.


Women and the maths problem

 

Women's underachievement in maths may not be due to their poor self-image in the subject, a new report suggests. Researcher Dr. Gijsbert Stoet at the University of Leeds says that the so-called "stereotype threat" theory - which holds that women perform worse than men because they expect to do badly - "does not stand up to scrutiny".

 

Earlier research had serious flaws, he says, with improper use of statistical techniques and methodology. Clearly, those who carried out this research need to review their own competence in maths. Stoet believes the gender gap may simply be that men and women have different interests from an early age, and says the answer to getting more women into maths and engineering is probably a matter of motivation.

 

According to last year's results, even though girls perform as well as boys in their maths GCSEs, 60% of A-levels in the subject are taken by boys, who achieve 60% of grade As.

 

I am an engineer, who has worked in the chemical industry for most of my working career. When I graduated in the 80, I assumed we were at the start of a new era for women in science: I studied alongside intelligent and motivated women, opportunities seemed aplenty, in-roads had been made.

 

But 20 years down the line, only 8.7% of British engineers are women, the lowest proportion in Europe, compared with 25% in Sweden. So what has happened?

 

One of the main problems is that careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (known as Stem) are not sufficiently promoted in schools, with fewer children taking up these subjects at GCSE and A-level. Year in, year out, we are told that Britain has a skills shortage. The general lack of interest among schoolchildren in maths and science subjects, together with the underlying social conditioning that still remains - that science subjects "aren't really for girls" - has led to a double-whammy effect, reducing female entrants even further.

 

Over the past few years, I have been involved in Stemnet, an organization dedicated to promoting these careers by getting people who work in jobs from biologists to builders to talk to schoolchildren about what they do. It's an attempt to debunk the myth that maths and sciences are too difficult or too boring. I was amazed to see hundreds of schoolboys and girls at a recent event at the Science Museum, presenting a range of experiments and projects they had prepared. And the ones prepares by girls were equally challenging and sophisticated.

 

I agree with the new study that rather than focusing on the problems of stereotyping, we should devote more time to encouraging girls into science and technology: they clearly respond.

 

But encouraging schoolgirls into university and careers is not all. As is typical in most sectors, I see a number of female engineers at the entry and midlevels of companies, but precious few at the top. This is a huge waste of talent. It also raises the issue of certain professional inequality and a biased attitude towards women. The report has done well to challenge the myths behind women's underachievement in schools, but more work still needs to be done to address the problem of women's lack of achievement in the workplace. At least in the spheres closely related to science and engineering.

16.

«They» in «to talk to schoolchildren about what they do» (paragraph 7) may refer to ...

 

1) schoolchildren.

2) careers.

3) experiments.

4) scientists.


Women and the maths problem

 

Women's underachievement in maths may not be due to their poor self-image in the subject, a new report suggests. Researcher Dr. Gijsbert Stoet at the University of Leeds says that the so-called "stereotype threat" theory - which holds that women perform worse than men because they expect to do badly - "does not stand up to scrutiny".

 

Earlier research had serious flaws, he says, with improper use of statistical techniques and methodology. Clearly, those who carried out this research need to review their own competence in maths. Stoet believes the gender gap may simply be that men and women have different interests from an early age, and says the answer to getting more women into maths and engineering is probably a matter of motivation.

 

According to last year's results, even though girls perform as well as boys in their maths GCSEs, 60% of A-levels in the subject are taken by boys, who achieve 60% of grade As.

 

I am an engineer, who has worked in the chemical industry for most of my working career. When I graduated in the 80, I assumed we were at the start of a new era for women in science: I studied alongside intelligent and motivated women, opportunities seemed aplenty, in-roads had been made.

 

But 20 years down the line, only 8.7% of British engineers are women, the lowest proportion in Europe, compared with 25% in Sweden. So what has happened?

 

One of the main problems is that careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (known as Stem) are not sufficiently promoted in schools, with fewer children taking up these subjects at GCSE and A-level. Year in, year out, we are told that Britain has a skills shortage. The general lack of interest among schoolchildren in maths and science subjects, together with the underlying social conditioning that still remains - that science subjects "aren't really for girls" - has led to a double-whammy effect, reducing female entrants even further.

 

Over the past few years, I have been involved in Stemnet, an organization dedicated to promoting these careers by getting people who work in jobs from biologists to builders to talk to schoolchildren about what they do. It's an attempt to debunk the myth that maths and sciences are too difficult or too boring. I was amazed to see hundreds of schoolboys and girls at a recent event at the Science Museum, presenting a range of experiments and projects they had prepared. And the ones prepares by girls were equally challenging and sophisticated.

 

I agree with the new study that rather than focusing on the problems of stereotyping, we should devote more time to encouraging girls into science and technology: they clearly respond.

 

But encouraging schoolgirls into university and careers is not all. As is typical in most sectors, I see a number of female engineers at the entry and midlevels of companies, but precious few at the top. This is a huge waste of talent. It also raises the issue of certain professional inequality and a biased attitude towards women. The report has done well to challenge the myths behind women's underachievement in schools, but more work still needs to be done to address the problem of women's lack of achievement in the workplace. At least in the spheres closely related to science and engineering.

17.

According to the final paragraphs, which of the factors discouraging girls from careers in science appears to be most important?

 

1) Academic underachievement.

2) Lack of opportunities in career growth.

3) Social stereotypes.

4) Lack of encouragement.


Women and the maths problem

 

Women's underachievement in maths may not be due to their poor self-image in the subject, a new report suggests. Researcher Dr. Gijsbert Stoet at the University of Leeds says that the so-called "stereotype threat" theory - which holds that women perform worse than men because they expect to do badly - "does not stand up to scrutiny".

 

Earlier research had serious flaws, he says, with improper use of statistical techniques and methodology. Clearly, those who carried out this research need to review their own competence in maths. Stoet believes the gender gap may simply be that men and women have different interests from an early age, and says the answer to getting more women into maths and engineering is probably a matter of motivation.

 

According to last year's results, even though girls perform as well as boys in their maths GCSEs, 60% of A-levels in the subject are taken by boys, who achieve 60% of grade As.

 

I am an engineer, who has worked in the chemical industry for most of my working career. When I graduated in the 80, I assumed we were at the start of a new era for women in science: I studied alongside intelligent and motivated women, opportunities seemed aplenty, in-roads had been made.

 

But 20 years down the line, only 8.7% of British engineers are women, the lowest proportion in Europe, compared with 25% in Sweden. So what has happened?

 

One of the main problems is that careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (known as Stem) are not sufficiently promoted in schools, with fewer children taking up these subjects at GCSE and A-level. Year in, year out, we are told that Britain has a skills shortage. The general lack of interest among schoolchildren in maths and science subjects, together with the underlying social conditioning that still remains - that science subjects "aren't really for girls" - has led to a double-whammy effect, reducing female entrants even further.

 

Over the past few years, I have been involved in Stemnet, an organization dedicated to promoting these careers by getting people who work in jobs from biologists to builders to talk to schoolchildren about what they do. It's an attempt to debunk the myth that maths and sciences are too difficult or too boring. I was amazed to see hundreds of schoolboys and girls at a recent event at the Science Museum, presenting a range of experiments and projects they had prepared. And the ones prepares by girls were equally challenging and sophisticated.

 

I agree with the new study that rather than focusing on the problems of stereotyping, we should devote more time to encouraging girls into science and technology: they clearly respond.

 

But encouraging schoolgirls into university and careers is not all. As is typical in most sectors, I see a number of female engineers at the entry and midlevels of companies, but precious few at the top. This is a huge waste of talent. It also raises the issue of certain professional inequality and a biased attitude towards women. The report has done well to challenge the myths behind women's underachievement in schools, but more work still needs to be done to address the problem of women's lack of achievement in the workplace. At least in the spheres closely related to science and engineering.

18.

The author's attitude to the problem may be called ...

 

1) interested.

2) impartial.

3) negative.

4) biased.


Women and the maths problem

 

Women's underachievement in maths may not be due to their poor self-image in the subject, a new report suggests. Researcher Dr. Gijsbert Stoet at the University of Leeds says that the so-called "stereotype threat" theory - which holds that women perform worse than men because they expect to do badly - "does not stand up to scrutiny".

 

Earlier research had serious flaws, he says, with improper use of statistical techniques and methodology. Clearly, those who carried out this research need to review their own competence in maths. Stoet believes the gender gap may simply be that men and women have different interests from an early age, and says the answer to getting more women into maths and engineering is probably a matter of motivation.

 

According to last year's results, even though girls perform as well as boys in their maths GCSEs, 60% of A-levels in the subject are taken by boys, who achieve 60% of grade As.

 

I am an engineer, who has worked in the chemical industry for most of my working career. When I graduated in the 80, I assumed we were at the start of a new era for women in science: I studied alongside intelligent and motivated women, opportunities seemed aplenty, in-roads had been made.

 

But 20 years down the line, only 8.7% of British engineers are women, the lowest proportion in Europe, compared with 25% in Sweden. So what has happened?

 

One of the main problems is that careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (known as Stem) are not sufficiently promoted in schools, with fewer children taking up these subjects at GCSE and A-level. Year in, year out, we are told that Britain has a skills shortage. The general lack of interest among schoolchildren in maths and science subjects, together with the underlying social conditioning that still remains - that science subjects "aren't really for girls" - has led to a double-whammy effect, reducing female entrants even further.

 

Over the past few years, I have been involved in Stemnet, an organization dedicated to promoting these careers by getting people who work in jobs from biologists to builders to talk to schoolchildren about what they do. It's an attempt to debunk the myth that maths and sciences are too difficult or too boring. I was amazed to see hundreds of schoolboys and girls at a recent event at the Science Museum, presenting a range of experiments and projects they had prepared. And the ones prepares by girls were equally challenging and sophisticated.

 

I agree with the new study that rather than focusing on the problems of stereotyping, we should devote more time to encouraging girls into science and technology: they clearly respond.

 

But encouraging schoolgirls into university and careers is not all. As is typical in most sectors, I see a number of female engineers at the entry and midlevels of companies, but precious few at the top. This is a huge waste of talent. It also raises the issue of certain professional inequality and a biased attitude towards women. The report has done well to challenge the myths behind women's underachievement in schools, but more work still needs to be done to address the problem of women's lack of achievement in the workplace. At least in the spheres closely related to science and engineering.

19.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово CAUSE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Natural Wonders: Meteor Crater

 

Some of the natural wonders are known for their beauty. The Meteor Crater is not one of them. It looks like a big hole in the desert. It ______ by a meteorite hitting the earth thousands of years ago.

20.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово LARGE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

The crater is 4,145 feet across, and 570 feet deep. It is the ______ impact crater in the entire world.

21.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово THINK так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

When Europeans discovered it in 1871, they ______ it was the top of a volcano.

22.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово EXPLORE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Since then, scientists ______ the crater for many years, but there are still many secrets and mysteries hiding inside it.

23.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово PACK так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

 

It was simple

 

I One day last summer my nine-year-old daughter went off to the camp. All her things ______ in a small bag.

24.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово GOOD так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Two weeks later, Anna came back home and I unpacked her things. Everything was clean and well folded. “Camp sure has changed you. Your things look much ______ than usual.”

25.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово CHILD так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

“It was simple, Mom,” she answered. “I didn’t unpack. Many ______ did the same.”

26.

Образуйте от слова SCIENCE однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

 

The World’s Language

 

The English language is famous for the richness of its vocabulary. Webster’s New International Dictionary lists 450,000 words, and the new Oxford English Dictionary has 615,000, but that is only part of the total. Technical and ______ terms would add millions more.

27.

Образуйте от слова SPEAK однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

The wealth of existing synonyms means that ______ of English have two words for something denoted by one word in a different language. The French, for instance, do not distinguish between house and home, between mind and brain. The Spanish cannot differentiate a chairman from a president.

28.

Образуйте от слова PRACTICE однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

In Russia, there are no native words for efficiency, challenge and engagement ring. Of course, every language has areas in which it needs, for ______ purposes, to be more expressive than others.

29.

Образуйте от слова NATURAL однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

The Eskimos have fifty words for types of snow, though there is no word for just plain snow. ______ , African languages have no native word for snow.

30.

Образуйте от слова DEVELOP однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Nowadays, globalization influences the ______ of languages.

31.

Образуйте от слова APPEAR однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Some native words ______ , giving way to international terms.

32.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) waved

2) nodded

3) bowed

4) bent


Helping Mother

“Liz! Remember to clean up the basement, ok?” Mrs. Parker called out. Liz, who was still lying in bed, sighed heavily and 32 ______ . “All right, mom,” she answered flatly, dragging herself out of bed. She got changed and headed downstairs for breakfast. As usual, the whole family was already seated at the dining table. Liz greeted everyone and sat at a 33 ______ seat next to her elder brother Evan. “Pass me the butter, bro,” she said. “Sure,” Evan replied and passed it to her. “Thanks,” Liz said, and 34 ______ a thin layer of it onto her toast. Mrs. Parker placed an arm onto her daughter’s shoulder. “Honey, I know it’s going to be a tiring day for you, and I’d like your brother to help too. But he’s got to head back to school for a day-long band practice.” Liz sat still and didn’t utter a 35 ______ word. She was mad that Evan had band practice and did not need to help in the 36 ______ chores. “I know what you're thinking, Liz. But honey, we really need your help. Dad's away on a 37 ______ trip, you know, his boss has sent him. Evan’s busy with band practices, and I’ve got to help your grandma. You know, her health’s been poor these days*” “Ok, ok. Enough of it, mom. I’ll clean up the basement,” Liz said. Sometimes she wished her mother wouldn’t explain the reasons to her. Anyway, she thought to herself, it’ll be good to 38 ______ the basement a little. She hadn’t stepped into it since they moved in here a couple of months ago. “Who knows something interesting will pop out of nowhere,” she grinned.

33.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) clear

2) unfilled

3) blank

4) vacant


Helping Mother

“Liz! Remember to clean up the basement, ok?” Mrs. Parker called out. Liz, who was still lying in bed, sighed heavily and 32 ______ . “All right, mom,” she answered flatly, dragging herself out of bed. She got changed and headed downstairs for breakfast. As usual, the whole family was already seated at the dining table. Liz greeted everyone and sat at a 33 ______ seat next to her elder brother Evan. “Pass me the butter, bro,” she said. “Sure,” Evan replied and passed it to her. “Thanks,” Liz said, and 34 ______ a thin layer of it onto her toast. Mrs. Parker placed an arm onto her daughter’s shoulder. “Honey, I know it’s going to be a tiring day for you, and I’d like your brother to help too. But he’s got to head back to school for a day-long band practice.” Liz sat still and didn’t utter a 35 ______ word. She was mad that Evan had band practice and did not need to help in the 36 ______ chores. “I know what you're thinking, Liz. But honey, we really need your help. Dad's away on a 37 ______ trip, you know, his boss has sent him. Evan’s busy with band practices, and I’ve got to help your grandma. You know, her health’s been poor these days*” “Ok, ok. Enough of it, mom. I’ll clean up the basement,” Liz said. Sometimes she wished her mother wouldn’t explain the reasons to her. Anyway, she thought to herself, it’ll be good to 38 ______ the basement a little. She hadn’t stepped into it since they moved in here a couple of months ago. “Who knows something interesting will pop out of nowhere,” she grinned.

34.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) spread

2) extended

3) divided

4) covered


Helping Mother

“Liz! Remember to clean up the basement, ok?” Mrs. Parker called out. Liz, who was still lying in bed, sighed heavily and 32 ______ . “All right, mom,” she answered flatly, dragging herself out of bed. She got changed and headed downstairs for breakfast. As usual, the whole family was already seated at the dining table. Liz greeted everyone and sat at a 33 ______ seat next to her elder brother Evan. “Pass me the butter, bro,” she said. “Sure,” Evan replied and passed it to her. “Thanks,” Liz said, and 34 ______ a thin layer of it onto her toast. Mrs. Parker placed an arm onto her daughter’s shoulder. “Honey, I know it’s going to be a tiring day for you, and I’d like your brother to help too. But he’s got to head back to school for a day-long band practice.” Liz sat still and didn’t utter a 35 ______ word. She was mad that Evan had band practice and did not need to help in the 36 ______ chores. “I know what you're thinking, Liz. But honey, we really need your help. Dad's away on a 37 ______ trip, you know, his boss has sent him. Evan’s busy with band practices, and I’ve got to help your grandma. You know, her health’s been poor these days*” “Ok, ok. Enough of it, mom. I’ll clean up the basement,” Liz said. Sometimes she wished her mother wouldn’t explain the reasons to her. Anyway, she thought to herself, it’ll be good to 38 ______ the basement a little. She hadn’t stepped into it since they moved in here a couple of months ago. “Who knows something interesting will pop out of nowhere,” she grinned.

35.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) separate

2) single

3) only

4) sole


Helping Mother

“Liz! Remember to clean up the basement, ok?” Mrs. Parker called out. Liz, who was still lying in bed, sighed heavily and 32 ______ . “All right, mom,” she answered flatly, dragging herself out of bed. She got changed and headed downstairs for breakfast. As usual, the whole family was already seated at the dining table. Liz greeted everyone and sat at a 33 ______ seat next to her elder brother Evan. “Pass me the butter, bro,” she said. “Sure,” Evan replied and passed it to her. “Thanks,” Liz said, and 34 ______ a thin layer of it onto her toast. Mrs. Parker placed an arm onto her daughter’s shoulder. “Honey, I know it’s going to be a tiring day for you, and I’d like your brother to help too. But he’s got to head back to school for a day-long band practice.” Liz sat still and didn’t utter a 35 ______ word. She was mad that Evan had band practice and did not need to help in the 36 ______ chores. “I know what you're thinking, Liz. But honey, we really need your help. Dad's away on a 37 ______ trip, you know, his boss has sent him. Evan’s busy with band practices, and I’ve got to help your grandma. You know, her health’s been poor these days*” “Ok, ok. Enough of it, mom. I’ll clean up the basement,” Liz said. Sometimes she wished her mother wouldn’t explain the reasons to her. Anyway, she thought to herself, it’ll be good to 38 ______ the basement a little. She hadn’t stepped into it since they moved in here a couple of months ago. “Who knows something interesting will pop out of nowhere,” she grinned.

36.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) housework

2) homework

3) household

4) housekeeping


Helping Mother

“Liz! Remember to clean up the basement, ok?” Mrs. Parker called out. Liz, who was still lying in bed, sighed heavily and 32 ______ . “All right, mom,” she answered flatly, dragging herself out of bed. She got changed and headed downstairs for breakfast. As usual, the whole family was already seated at the dining table. Liz greeted everyone and sat at a 33 ______ seat next to her elder brother Evan. “Pass me the butter, bro,” she said. “Sure,” Evan replied and passed it to her. “Thanks,” Liz said, and 34 ______ a thin layer of it onto her toast. Mrs. Parker placed an arm onto her daughter’s shoulder. “Honey, I know it’s going to be a tiring day for you, and I’d like your brother to help too. But he’s got to head back to school for a day-long band practice.” Liz sat still and didn’t utter a 35 ______ word. She was mad that Evan had band practice and did not need to help in the 36 ______ chores. “I know what you're thinking, Liz. But honey, we really need your help. Dad's away on a 37 ______ trip, you know, his boss has sent him. Evan’s busy with band practices, and I’ve got to help your grandma. You know, her health’s been poor these days*” “Ok, ok. Enough of it, mom. I’ll clean up the basement,” Liz said. Sometimes she wished her mother wouldn’t explain the reasons to her. Anyway, she thought to herself, it’ll be good to 38 ______ the basement a little. She hadn’t stepped into it since they moved in here a couple of months ago. “Who knows something interesting will pop out of nowhere,” she grinned.

37.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) working

2) official

3) company

4) business


Helping Mother

“Liz! Remember to clean up the basement, ok?” Mrs. Parker called out. Liz, who was still lying in bed, sighed heavily and 32 ______ . “All right, mom,” she answered flatly, dragging herself out of bed. She got changed and headed downstairs for breakfast. As usual, the whole family was already seated at the dining table. Liz greeted everyone and sat at a 33 ______ seat next to her elder brother Evan. “Pass me the butter, bro,” she said. “Sure,” Evan replied and passed it to her. “Thanks,” Liz said, and 34 ______ a thin layer of it onto her toast. Mrs. Parker placed an arm onto her daughter’s shoulder. “Honey, I know it’s going to be a tiring day for you, and I’d like your brother to help too. But he’s got to head back to school for a day-long band practice.” Liz sat still and didn’t utter a 35 ______ word. She was mad that Evan had band practice and did not need to help in the 36 ______ chores. “I know what you're thinking, Liz. But honey, we really need your help. Dad's away on a 37 ______ trip, you know, his boss has sent him. Evan’s busy with band practices, and I’ve got to help your grandma. You know, her health’s been poor these days*” “Ok, ok. Enough of it, mom. I’ll clean up the basement,” Liz said. Sometimes she wished her mother wouldn’t explain the reasons to her. Anyway, she thought to herself, it’ll be good to 38 ______ the basement a little. She hadn’t stepped into it since they moved in here a couple of months ago. “Who knows something interesting will pop out of nowhere,” she grinned.

38.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) discover

2) research

3) explore

4) analyze


Helping Mother

“Liz! Remember to clean up the basement, ok?” Mrs. Parker called out. Liz, who was still lying in bed, sighed heavily and 32 ______ . “All right, mom,” she answered flatly, dragging herself out of bed. She got changed and headed downstairs for breakfast. As usual, the whole family was already seated at the dining table. Liz greeted everyone and sat at a 33 ______ seat next to her elder brother Evan. “Pass me the butter, bro,” she said. “Sure,” Evan replied and passed it to her. “Thanks,” Liz said, and 34 ______ a thin layer of it onto her toast. Mrs. Parker placed an arm onto her daughter’s shoulder. “Honey, I know it’s going to be a tiring day for you, and I’d like your brother to help too. But he’s got to head back to school for a day-long band practice.” Liz sat still and didn’t utter a 35 ______ word. She was mad that Evan had band practice and did not need to help in the 36 ______ chores. “I know what you're thinking, Liz. But honey, we really need your help. Dad's away on a 37 ______ trip, you know, his boss has sent him. Evan’s busy with band practices, and I’ve got to help your grandma. You know, her health’s been poor these days*” “Ok, ok. Enough of it, mom. I’ll clean up the basement,” Liz said. Sometimes she wished her mother wouldn’t explain the reasons to her. Anyway, she thought to herself, it’ll be good to 38 ______ the basement a little. She hadn’t stepped into it since they moved in here a couple of months ago. “Who knows something interesting will pop out of nowhere,” she grinned.

39.

You have received a letter from your English-speaking pen-friend Nicole who writes:

 

...When I think about leaving school it is clear I'm going to miss my school friends, classes and teachers very much. They’re so important to me. We seem to be very friendly and enthusiastic about participating in all the school events. What does school mean to you? Do you feel the same about it? Do you think you will miss school? Are you going to meet your school friends after you finish school?

I have lived in London most of my life but I'd really love to travel to other countries...

 

Write a letter to Nicole. In your letter answer her questions, ask 3 questions about her plans for travelling. Write 100—140 words. Remember the rules of letter writing. You have 20 minutes to do this task.

40.

Выберите только ОДНО из двух предложенных высказываний и выразите своё мнение по предложенной проблеме согласно данному плану.

 

Comment on one of the following statements.

 

1. Some people think that learning foreign languages is a waste of time and money.

2. It’s not right to be strict with little children.

 

What is your opinion? Do you agree with this statement? Write 200–250 words. Use the following plan:

− make an introduction (state the problem)

− express your personal opinion and give 2–3 reasons for your opinion

− express an opposing opinion and give 1–2 reasons for this opposing opinion

− explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion

− make a conclusion restating your position

41.

Imagine that you are preparing a project with your friend. You have found some interesting material for the presentation and you want to read this text to your friend. You have 1.5 minutes to read the text silently, then be ready to read it out aloud. You will not have more than 1.5 minutes to read it.

 

Chameleons don’t change colour to match the background. They change colour as a result of different emotional states. Chameleons change colour when they beat another chameleon in a fight. They change colour when a member of the opposite sex steps into view and they sometimes change colour due to fluctuations in either light or temperature.

A chameleon’s skin contains several layers of specialised cells. Altering the balance between these layers causes the skin to reflect different kinds of light, making chameleons a kind of walking colour-wheel. It’s odd how persistent the belief that they change colour to match the background is. The myth first appears in the work of a minor Greek writer of entertaining stories and potted biographies. Aristotle, far more influential and writing a century earlier, had already, quite correctly, linked the colour-change to fear. But it’s come back with a vengeance since and to this day is perhaps the only thing most people think they ‘know’ about chameleons.

42.

Study the advertisement.

 

 

You are considering visiting a museum and you'd like to get more information. In 1.5 minutes you are to ask five direct questions to find out the following:

1) location of the museum

2) special offers

3) number of exhibitions

4) working hours

5) tickets for kids

You have 20 seconds to ask each question.

43.

These are photos from your photo album. Choose one photo to describe to your friend.

 

 

You will have to start speaking in 1.5 minutes and will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). In your talk remember to speak about:

• where and when the photo was taken

• what/who is in the photo

• what is happening

• why you keep the photo in your album

• why you decided to show the picture to your friend

You have to talk continuously, starting with: "I’ve chosen photo number… "

44.

Study the two photographs. In 1.5 minutes be ready to compare and contrast the photographs:

 

• give a brief description of the photos (action, location)

• say what the pictures have in common

• say in what way the pictures are different

• say which game presented in the pictures you’d prefer to play

• explain why

 

You will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). You have to talk continuously.