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Вариант № 983639

1.

Вы услышите 6 высказываний. Установите соответствие между высказываниями каждого говорящего A–F и утверждениями, данными в списке 1–7. Используйте каждое утверждение, обозначенное соответствующей цифрой, только один раз. В задании есть одно лишнее утверждение. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

1. I feel unhappy because I can’t change public attitude to our planet.

2. I would like to see new energy saving laws introduced.

3. I am afraid of the after-effects of human activities.

4. I am sure that wise attitude to basic earth supplies is necessary.

5. I do not want my family to live in polluted environment.

6. I am for the use of energy saving practices in house construction.

7. I find many simple ways to help our planet in everyday life.

 

 

 

ГоворящийABCDEF
Утверждение

2.

Вы услышите диалог. Определите, какие из приведённых утверждений А–G соответствуют содержанию текста (1 – True), какие не соответствуют (2 – False) и о чём в тексте не сказано, то есть на основании текста нельзя дать ни положительного, ни отрицательного ответа (3 – Not stated). Занесите номер выбранного Вами варианта ответа в таблицу. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

A) Tini can’t live a day without reading a book.

B) Tini can’t wait to leave school.

C) Tini has got some work experience.

D) Tini is ready to meet the difficulties of the real world.

E) John is pleased with his working hours.

F) Tini disapproves of John choosing a teaching career.

G) Tini thinks she has the right personality for a career in banking.

 

Запишите в ответ цифры, расположив их в порядке, соответствующем буквам:

ABCDEFG
       

3.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Before moving to the USA Kara’s parents decided to

 

1) send her to a bilingual school.

2) start teaching her English at home.

3) take a basic English course themselves.

4.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Kara thinks it’s easier to learn a foreign language at an early age because children

 

1) are not afraid to communicate with strangers.

2) learn it the way they learn their mother tongue.

3) are highly motivated learners.

5.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The main problem the children from immigrant families face in the USA is that they

 

1) quickly forget their native language.

2) have a hard time learning English.

3) can’t fit into the English-speaking environment.

6.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Kara thinks the key element in learning French is

 

1) language environment.

2) a good teacher.

3) a good textbook.

7.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Kara uses Spanglish when she

 

1) talks to the older members of her family.

2) lacks words to express her thoughts.

3) talks to the Spanish who are beginners in English.

8.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The adults in Kara’s family are against

 

1) teaching their children Spanish after they have started school.

2) making English the only language of communication in the family.

3) their children speaking English after they are five years old.

9.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Kara buys books in English if

 

1) she wants to practice and improve her language.

2) they are not translated into Spanish.

3) she wants to read them in the original.

10.

Установите соответствие между заголовками 1–8 и текстами A–G. Запишите свои ответы в таблицу. Используйте каждую цифру только один раз. В задании есть один лишний заголовок.

 

1. Education

2. Way of life

3. Public transport

4. Geography

5. Places to stay in

6. Favourite food

7. Hot spots for kids

8. Nightlife

 

 

A. Denmark, a small kingdom in northern Europe, has a lot of interesting places for tourists with children. For example, Legoland, a theme park, has become the largest tourist attraction in Denmark outside its capital Copenhagen. And Copenhagen itself is world famous for its Tivoli Gardens amusement park, which opened in 1843 in the heart of the city. The park offers ballet and circus performances, restaurants, concerts, and fireworks displays.

 

B. Denmark is the smallest Scandinavian country, consisting of the Jutland peninsula, north of Germany, and over 400 islands of various sizes, some inhabited and linked to the mainland by ferry or bridge. Throughout the country, low hills provide a constant change of attractive views; there are also cool and shady forests of beech trees, large areas of open land covered with rough grass, a beautiful lake district, sand dunes and white cliffs on the coast.

 

C. More than four-fifths of all Danes live in towns. The main cities represent a combination of medieval buildings, such as castles and cathedrals, and modern office buildings and homes. Denmark’s high standard of living and wide-ranging social services guarantee that the cities have no poor districts. Most people in the cities live in flats. But in the suburbs many also live in single-family houses.

 

D. Denmark’s fine beaches attract many visitors, and there are hotels and pensions in all major seaside resorts. Besides, excellent inns are to be found all over the country. Some are small and only serve local travellers, but others are adapted to the tourist and have established reputations for both international dishes and local specialities. There are also private rooms to let, usually for one night, and chalets all over Denmark.

 

E. There is a wide selection of places to go out in the evening, particularly in Copenhagen. Jazz and dance clubs in the capital city are top quality and world-famous performers appear regularly. There are numerous cafes, beer gardens and speciality beer bars. Entertainment available includes opera at the recently opened opera house in Copenhagen, ballet and theatre at a number of places in the larger cities, and live music of all kinds.

 

F. Most Danes eat four meals a day — breakfast, lunch, dinner, and a late-evening supper. Breakfast generally consists of cereal, cheese, or eggs. Dinner, which includes fish or meat, is usually the only hot meal. A traditional Danish dinner consists of roast duckling stuffed with apples, served with red cabbage and boiled potatoes. The other Danish meals consist mostly of sandwiches.

 

G. Almost all adult Danes can read and write. Danish law requires children to attend nine years of school. Primary school consists of the first seven grades, and secondary school lasts from three to five years. A five-year secondary school student can enter a university. Denmark has three universities. The University of Copenhagen is the oldest and largest. It was founded in 1479 and has about 24,000 students.

 

 

 

 

ТекстABCDEFG
Заголовок

11.

Прочитайте текст и заполните пропуски A–F частями предложений, обозначенными цифрами 1–7. Одна из частей в списке 1–7 — лишняя. Занесите цифры, обозначающие соответствующие части предложений, в таблицу.

 

If you eat very quickly, it may be enough to increase your risk of being overweight, research suggests.

Osaka University scientists looked at the eating habits of 3,000 people. Just about half of them told researchers that they A ______ . Compared with those who did not eat quickly, fast-eating men were 84% more likely to be overweight, and women were 100% more likely to В ______ .

Japanese scientists said that there were a number of reasons why eating fast С ______ . They said it could prevent the work of a signalling system which tells your brain to stop eating because your stomach is full. They said: ‘If you eat quickly you basically fill your stomach before the system has a chance to react, so you D _____ .

The researchers also explained that a mechanism that helps make us fat today, developed with evolution and helped people get more food in the periods when they were short of it. The scientists added that the habit of eating fast could be received from one’s parents genes or E ______ .

They said that, if possible, children should be taught to F ______ , and allowed to stop when they felt full up at mealtimes. ‘The advice of our grandmothers about chewing everything 20 times might be true — if you take a bit more time eating, it could have a positive influence on your weight.

 

1. just overfill your stomach

2. could be bad for your weight

3. have a habit of eating quickly

4. linked to obesity

5. eat as slowly as possible

6. put on weight

7. learned at a very early age

 

ПропускABCDEF
Часть предложения

12.

The email letter the author sent to Oxford was meant to be ...

 

1) regretful.

2) desperate.

3) respectful.

4) mocking.


Why I sent Oxford a rejection letter

 

A little over a month ago, I sent Oxford a rejection email that parodied the thousands that they send each year. Much to my surprise, it has become a bit of an Internet hit, and has provoked reactions of both horror and amusement.

 

In my letter I wrote: "I have now considered your establishment as a place to read Law (Jurisprudence). I very much regret to inform you that I will be withdrawing my application. I realize you may be disappointed by this decision, but you were in competition with many fantastic universities and following your interview, I am afraid you do not quite meet the standard of the universities I will be considering."

 

I sent the email after returning from my interview at Magdalen College, Oxford, to prove to a couple of my friends that Oxbridge did not need to be held in awe. One of them subsequently shared it on Facebook because he found it funny.

 

I certainly did not expect the email to spread as far as it has. Varying between offers of TV interviews and hundreds of enthusiastic Facebook messages, it has certainly been far-reaching. Many of my friends and undoubtedly many strangers were unable to comprehend that I'd sent such an email to this bastion of prestige and privilege. Why was I not afraid of damaging my future prospects as a lawyer? Didn't I think this might hurt my chances with other universities?

 

For me, such questions paint a picture of a very cynical society. I do not want to study law because I want to be rich, or wear an uncomfortable wig and cloak. Perhaps optimistically, I want to study law because I am interested in justice.

 

To me, withdrawing my application to an institution that is a symbol of unfairness in both our education and the legal system (which is so dominated by Oxbridge graduates) makes perfect sense, and I am reluctant to be part of a system so heavily dominated by such a narrow group of self-selecting elites.

 

So, why did I apply in the first place? If you're achieving high grades at A-level (or equivalent), you can feel quite a lot of pressure to "prove yourself' by getting an Oxbridge offer. Coupled with the fact that I grew up on benefits in council estates throughout Bristol - not a type of heritage often associated with an Oxbridge interview -1 decided to give it a try.

 

It was only at the interview that I started to question what exactly I was trying to prove. I was well aware that fantastic candidates are often turned down, and I did not believe that this was a true reflection of their academic potential.

 

Although I share concern that not going to Oxbridge gives you a "chip on your shoulder", I did not write to Oxford to avoid the risk of being labeled as an "Oxbridge reject": I already am one. Last year I made an (admittedly weak) application to Cambridge and was inevitably rejected post-interview.

 

A year ago, I was in awe of the beautiful buildings of Oxbridge, but today I am in awe of the sheer number of people who, like me, have managed to not take it so seriously. Ultimately, I am not harming Oxford by laughing at it, and it is an amazing feeling to realize that so many people are enjoying my email. Actually, I was amazed to know how many people of different ages bothered to read it and even to leave their comments about it in Facebook. I had fun reading some of them, too.

13.

The letter caused so much response because people ...

 

1) fully agreed with the message.

2) found the topic very interesting.

3) wanted to defend Oxbridge.

4) were outraged with the letter.


Why I sent Oxford a rejection letter

 

A little over a month ago, I sent Oxford a rejection email that parodied the thousands that they send each year. Much to my surprise, it has become a bit of an Internet hit, and has provoked reactions of both horror and amusement.

 

In my letter I wrote: "I have now considered your establishment as a place to read Law (Jurisprudence). I very much regret to inform you that I will be withdrawing my application. I realize you may be disappointed by this decision, but you were in competition with many fantastic universities and following your interview, I am afraid you do not quite meet the standard of the universities I will be considering."

 

I sent the email after returning from my interview at Magdalen College, Oxford, to prove to a couple of my friends that Oxbridge did not need to be held in awe. One of them subsequently shared it on Facebook because he found it funny.

 

I certainly did not expect the email to spread as far as it has. Varying between offers of TV interviews and hundreds of enthusiastic Facebook messages, it has certainly been far-reaching. Many of my friends and undoubtedly many strangers were unable to comprehend that I'd sent such an email to this bastion of prestige and privilege. Why was I not afraid of damaging my future prospects as a lawyer? Didn't I think this might hurt my chances with other universities?

 

For me, such questions paint a picture of a very cynical society. I do not want to study law because I want to be rich, or wear an uncomfortable wig and cloak. Perhaps optimistically, I want to study law because I am interested in justice.

 

To me, withdrawing my application to an institution that is a symbol of unfairness in both our education and the legal system (which is so dominated by Oxbridge graduates) makes perfect sense, and I am reluctant to be part of a system so heavily dominated by such a narrow group of self-selecting elites.

 

So, why did I apply in the first place? If you're achieving high grades at A-level (or equivalent), you can feel quite a lot of pressure to "prove yourself' by getting an Oxbridge offer. Coupled with the fact that I grew up on benefits in council estates throughout Bristol - not a type of heritage often associated with an Oxbridge interview -1 decided to give it a try.

 

It was only at the interview that I started to question what exactly I was trying to prove. I was well aware that fantastic candidates are often turned down, and I did not believe that this was a true reflection of their academic potential.

 

Although I share concern that not going to Oxbridge gives you a "chip on your shoulder", I did not write to Oxford to avoid the risk of being labeled as an "Oxbridge reject": I already am one. Last year I made an (admittedly weak) application to Cambridge and was inevitably rejected post-interview.

 

A year ago, I was in awe of the beautiful buildings of Oxbridge, but today I am in awe of the sheer number of people who, like me, have managed to not take it so seriously. Ultimately, I am not harming Oxford by laughing at it, and it is an amazing feeling to realize that so many people are enjoying my email. Actually, I was amazed to know how many people of different ages bothered to read it and even to leave their comments about it in Facebook. I had fun reading some of them, too.

14.

The author accuses society of cynicism because ...

 

1) people seem to be more worried about reputations.

2) people supported Oxbridge.

3) lawyers do their job for high incomes.

4) universities are very selective.


Why I sent Oxford a rejection letter

 

A little over a month ago, I sent Oxford a rejection email that parodied the thousands that they send each year. Much to my surprise, it has become a bit of an Internet hit, and has provoked reactions of both horror and amusement.

 

In my letter I wrote: "I have now considered your establishment as a place to read Law (Jurisprudence). I very much regret to inform you that I will be withdrawing my application. I realize you may be disappointed by this decision, but you were in competition with many fantastic universities and following your interview, I am afraid you do not quite meet the standard of the universities I will be considering."

 

I sent the email after returning from my interview at Magdalen College, Oxford, to prove to a couple of my friends that Oxbridge did not need to be held in awe. One of them subsequently shared it on Facebook because he found it funny.

 

I certainly did not expect the email to spread as far as it has. Varying between offers of TV interviews and hundreds of enthusiastic Facebook messages, it has certainly been far-reaching. Many of my friends and undoubtedly many strangers were unable to comprehend that I'd sent such an email to this bastion of prestige and privilege. Why was I not afraid of damaging my future prospects as a lawyer? Didn't I think this might hurt my chances with other universities?

 

For me, such questions paint a picture of a very cynical society. I do not want to study law because I want to be rich, or wear an uncomfortable wig and cloak. Perhaps optimistically, I want to study law because I am interested in justice.

 

To me, withdrawing my application to an institution that is a symbol of unfairness in both our education and the legal system (which is so dominated by Oxbridge graduates) makes perfect sense, and I am reluctant to be part of a system so heavily dominated by such a narrow group of self-selecting elites.

 

So, why did I apply in the first place? If you're achieving high grades at A-level (or equivalent), you can feel quite a lot of pressure to "prove yourself' by getting an Oxbridge offer. Coupled with the fact that I grew up on benefits in council estates throughout Bristol - not a type of heritage often associated with an Oxbridge interview -1 decided to give it a try.

 

It was only at the interview that I started to question what exactly I was trying to prove. I was well aware that fantastic candidates are often turned down, and I did not believe that this was a true reflection of their academic potential.

 

Although I share concern that not going to Oxbridge gives you a "chip on your shoulder", I did not write to Oxford to avoid the risk of being labeled as an "Oxbridge reject": I already am one. Last year I made an (admittedly weak) application to Cambridge and was inevitably rejected post-interview.

 

A year ago, I was in awe of the beautiful buildings of Oxbridge, but today I am in awe of the sheer number of people who, like me, have managed to not take it so seriously. Ultimately, I am not harming Oxford by laughing at it, and it is an amazing feeling to realize that so many people are enjoying my email. Actually, I was amazed to know how many people of different ages bothered to read it and even to leave their comments about it in Facebook. I had fun reading some of them, too.

15.

Judging by paragraph 7, the author comes from a family which is ...

 

1) aristocratic.

2) educated.

3) not very rich.

4) big.


Why I sent Oxford a rejection letter

 

A little over a month ago, I sent Oxford a rejection email that parodied the thousands that they send each year. Much to my surprise, it has become a bit of an Internet hit, and has provoked reactions of both horror and amusement.

 

In my letter I wrote: "I have now considered your establishment as a place to read Law (Jurisprudence). I very much regret to inform you that I will be withdrawing my application. I realize you may be disappointed by this decision, but you were in competition with many fantastic universities and following your interview, I am afraid you do not quite meet the standard of the universities I will be considering."

 

I sent the email after returning from my interview at Magdalen College, Oxford, to prove to a couple of my friends that Oxbridge did not need to be held in awe. One of them subsequently shared it on Facebook because he found it funny.

 

I certainly did not expect the email to spread as far as it has. Varying between offers of TV interviews and hundreds of enthusiastic Facebook messages, it has certainly been far-reaching. Many of my friends and undoubtedly many strangers were unable to comprehend that I'd sent such an email to this bastion of prestige and privilege. Why was I not afraid of damaging my future prospects as a lawyer? Didn't I think this might hurt my chances with other universities?

 

For me, such questions paint a picture of a very cynical society. I do not want to study law because I want to be rich, or wear an uncomfortable wig and cloak. Perhaps optimistically, I want to study law because I am interested in justice.

 

To me, withdrawing my application to an institution that is a symbol of unfairness in both our education and the legal system (which is so dominated by Oxbridge graduates) makes perfect sense, and I am reluctant to be part of a system so heavily dominated by such a narrow group of self-selecting elites.

 

So, why did I apply in the first place? If you're achieving high grades at A-level (or equivalent), you can feel quite a lot of pressure to "prove yourself' by getting an Oxbridge offer. Coupled with the fact that I grew up on benefits in council estates throughout Bristol - not a type of heritage often associated with an Oxbridge interview -1 decided to give it a try.

 

It was only at the interview that I started to question what exactly I was trying to prove. I was well aware that fantastic candidates are often turned down, and I did not believe that this was a true reflection of their academic potential.

 

Although I share concern that not going to Oxbridge gives you a "chip on your shoulder", I did not write to Oxford to avoid the risk of being labeled as an "Oxbridge reject": I already am one. Last year I made an (admittedly weak) application to Cambridge and was inevitably rejected post-interview.

 

A year ago, I was in awe of the beautiful buildings of Oxbridge, but today I am in awe of the sheer number of people who, like me, have managed to not take it so seriously. Ultimately, I am not harming Oxford by laughing at it, and it is an amazing feeling to realize that so many people are enjoying my email. Actually, I was amazed to know how many people of different ages bothered to read it and even to leave their comments about it in Facebook. I had fun reading some of them, too.

16.

The author believes that the selection to Oxbridge ...

 

1) is unfair.

2) reveals candidates' abilities.

3) needs improvement.

4) is hard to understand.


Why I sent Oxford a rejection letter

 

A little over a month ago, I sent Oxford a rejection email that parodied the thousands that they send each year. Much to my surprise, it has become a bit of an Internet hit, and has provoked reactions of both horror and amusement.

 

In my letter I wrote: "I have now considered your establishment as a place to read Law (Jurisprudence). I very much regret to inform you that I will be withdrawing my application. I realize you may be disappointed by this decision, but you were in competition with many fantastic universities and following your interview, I am afraid you do not quite meet the standard of the universities I will be considering."

 

I sent the email after returning from my interview at Magdalen College, Oxford, to prove to a couple of my friends that Oxbridge did not need to be held in awe. One of them subsequently shared it on Facebook because he found it funny.

 

I certainly did not expect the email to spread as far as it has. Varying between offers of TV interviews and hundreds of enthusiastic Facebook messages, it has certainly been far-reaching. Many of my friends and undoubtedly many strangers were unable to comprehend that I'd sent such an email to this bastion of prestige and privilege. Why was I not afraid of damaging my future prospects as a lawyer? Didn't I think this might hurt my chances with other universities?

 

For me, such questions paint a picture of a very cynical society. I do not want to study law because I want to be rich, or wear an uncomfortable wig and cloak. Perhaps optimistically, I want to study law because I am interested in justice.

 

To me, withdrawing my application to an institution that is a symbol of unfairness in both our education and the legal system (which is so dominated by Oxbridge graduates) makes perfect sense, and I am reluctant to be part of a system so heavily dominated by such a narrow group of self-selecting elites.

 

So, why did I apply in the first place? If you're achieving high grades at A-level (or equivalent), you can feel quite a lot of pressure to "prove yourself' by getting an Oxbridge offer. Coupled with the fact that I grew up on benefits in council estates throughout Bristol - not a type of heritage often associated with an Oxbridge interview -1 decided to give it a try.

 

It was only at the interview that I started to question what exactly I was trying to prove. I was well aware that fantastic candidates are often turned down, and I did not believe that this was a true reflection of their academic potential.

 

Although I share concern that not going to Oxbridge gives you a "chip on your shoulder", I did not write to Oxford to avoid the risk of being labeled as an "Oxbridge reject": I already am one. Last year I made an (admittedly weak) application to Cambridge and was inevitably rejected post-interview.

 

A year ago, I was in awe of the beautiful buildings of Oxbridge, but today I am in awe of the sheer number of people who, like me, have managed to not take it so seriously. Ultimately, I am not harming Oxford by laughing at it, and it is an amazing feeling to realize that so many people are enjoying my email. Actually, I was amazed to know how many people of different ages bothered to read it and even to leave their comments about it in Facebook. I had fun reading some of them, too.

17.

The expression «chip on your shoulder» in paragraph 9 means ...

 

1) reflection of one's potential.

2) feelings of unfair treatment.

3) below-average performance.

4) record of achievements.


Why I sent Oxford a rejection letter

 

A little over a month ago, I sent Oxford a rejection email that parodied the thousands that they send each year. Much to my surprise, it has become a bit of an Internet hit, and has provoked reactions of both horror and amusement.

 

In my letter I wrote: "I have now considered your establishment as a place to read Law (Jurisprudence). I very much regret to inform you that I will be withdrawing my application. I realize you may be disappointed by this decision, but you were in competition with many fantastic universities and following your interview, I am afraid you do not quite meet the standard of the universities I will be considering."

 

I sent the email after returning from my interview at Magdalen College, Oxford, to prove to a couple of my friends that Oxbridge did not need to be held in awe. One of them subsequently shared it on Facebook because he found it funny.

 

I certainly did not expect the email to spread as far as it has. Varying between offers of TV interviews and hundreds of enthusiastic Facebook messages, it has certainly been far-reaching. Many of my friends and undoubtedly many strangers were unable to comprehend that I'd sent such an email to this bastion of prestige and privilege. Why was I not afraid of damaging my future prospects as a lawyer? Didn't I think this might hurt my chances with other universities?

 

For me, such questions paint a picture of a very cynical society. I do not want to study law because I want to be rich, or wear an uncomfortable wig and cloak. Perhaps optimistically, I want to study law because I am interested in justice.

 

To me, withdrawing my application to an institution that is a symbol of unfairness in both our education and the legal system (which is so dominated by Oxbridge graduates) makes perfect sense, and I am reluctant to be part of a system so heavily dominated by such a narrow group of self-selecting elites.

 

So, why did I apply in the first place? If you're achieving high grades at A-level (or equivalent), you can feel quite a lot of pressure to "prove yourself' by getting an Oxbridge offer. Coupled with the fact that I grew up on benefits in council estates throughout Bristol - not a type of heritage often associated with an Oxbridge interview -1 decided to give it a try.

 

It was only at the interview that I started to question what exactly I was trying to prove. I was well aware that fantastic candidates are often turned down, and I did not believe that this was a true reflection of their academic potential.

 

Although I share concern that not going to Oxbridge gives you a "chip on your shoulder", I did not write to Oxford to avoid the risk of being labeled as an "Oxbridge reject": I already am one. Last year I made an (admittedly weak) application to Cambridge and was inevitably rejected post-interview.

 

A year ago, I was in awe of the beautiful buildings of Oxbridge, but today I am in awe of the sheer number of people who, like me, have managed to not take it so seriously. Ultimately, I am not harming Oxford by laughing at it, and it is an amazing feeling to realize that so many people are enjoying my email. Actually, I was amazed to know how many people of different ages bothered to read it and even to leave their comments about it in Facebook. I had fun reading some of them, too.

18.

«It» in «have managed to not take it so seriously» in the last paragraph refers to ...

 

1) Oxford.

2) Oxbridge rejection.

3) university studies.

4) university interview.


Why I sent Oxford a rejection letter

 

A little over a month ago, I sent Oxford a rejection email that parodied the thousands that they send each year. Much to my surprise, it has become a bit of an Internet hit, and has provoked reactions of both horror and amusement.

 

In my letter I wrote: "I have now considered your establishment as a place to read Law (Jurisprudence). I very much regret to inform you that I will be withdrawing my application. I realize you may be disappointed by this decision, but you were in competition with many fantastic universities and following your interview, I am afraid you do not quite meet the standard of the universities I will be considering."

 

I sent the email after returning from my interview at Magdalen College, Oxford, to prove to a couple of my friends that Oxbridge did not need to be held in awe. One of them subsequently shared it on Facebook because he found it funny.

 

I certainly did not expect the email to spread as far as it has. Varying between offers of TV interviews and hundreds of enthusiastic Facebook messages, it has certainly been far-reaching. Many of my friends and undoubtedly many strangers were unable to comprehend that I'd sent such an email to this bastion of prestige and privilege. Why was I not afraid of damaging my future prospects as a lawyer? Didn't I think this might hurt my chances with other universities?

 

For me, such questions paint a picture of a very cynical society. I do not want to study law because I want to be rich, or wear an uncomfortable wig and cloak. Perhaps optimistically, I want to study law because I am interested in justice.

 

To me, withdrawing my application to an institution that is a symbol of unfairness in both our education and the legal system (which is so dominated by Oxbridge graduates) makes perfect sense, and I am reluctant to be part of a system so heavily dominated by such a narrow group of self-selecting elites.

 

So, why did I apply in the first place? If you're achieving high grades at A-level (or equivalent), you can feel quite a lot of pressure to "prove yourself' by getting an Oxbridge offer. Coupled with the fact that I grew up on benefits in council estates throughout Bristol - not a type of heritage often associated with an Oxbridge interview -1 decided to give it a try.

 

It was only at the interview that I started to question what exactly I was trying to prove. I was well aware that fantastic candidates are often turned down, and I did not believe that this was a true reflection of their academic potential.

 

Although I share concern that not going to Oxbridge gives you a "chip on your shoulder", I did not write to Oxford to avoid the risk of being labeled as an "Oxbridge reject": I already am one. Last year I made an (admittedly weak) application to Cambridge and was inevitably rejected post-interview.

 

A year ago, I was in awe of the beautiful buildings of Oxbridge, but today I am in awe of the sheer number of people who, like me, have managed to not take it so seriously. Ultimately, I am not harming Oxford by laughing at it, and it is an amazing feeling to realize that so many people are enjoying my email. Actually, I was amazed to know how many people of different ages bothered to read it and even to leave their comments about it in Facebook. I had fun reading some of them, too.

19.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово RISE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Global warming

 

In northern Québec and Labrador, temperatures __________________ two degrees Celsius since the mid-1990s. That rise has helped more trees grow in the area which was previously too cold for trees.

20.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово WARM так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

And the more trees that grow, the __________________ the region becomes.

21.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово BE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

“The cold landscape that we are accustomed to in northern Canada __________________ a thing of the past soon,” specialists predict.

22.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово INVITE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Sense of humour

 

There are many funny stories about Will Rogers, a famous American actor and humorist. Once he __________________ to the White House to meet President Calvin Coolidge.

23.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово MAKE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Rogers was cautioned not to try to be funny because the President had no sense of humour. Rogers bet that he __________________ Coolidge laugh within 20 seconds.

24.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово QUESTION так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

When the formal introduction was made and the words “Mr. President, may I introduce my friend, Mr. Will Rogers,” were pronounced, Rogers held out his hand with a __________________ look and said, “Pardon me, I didn’t quite get the name.”

25.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово WIN так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Coolidge roared with laughter, and Rogers __________________ the bet.

26.

Образуйте от слова NECESSARY однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

 

Advantages of a regular homework

 

What is homework? Should it always be done in writing, or can it be oral? Is it ______ connected with the information and tasks from the text books?

27.

Образуйте от слова ACTIVE однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Homework refers to any work or ______ that students are asked to do outside the classroom, either on their own or with other students or parents.

28.

Образуйте от слова HIGH однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Sometimes it is based on comparatively simple drill exercises, sometimes it involves ______ challenging tasks, project or research work aimed at integrating skills and knowledge from different subject areas.

29.

Образуйте от слова ROUTINE однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Research indicates that schools in which homework is ______ assigned and systemically assessed tend to have higher achieving students, as learning is not confined to the schoolroom environment.

30.

Образуйте от слова DEPEND однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Homework appropriately designed and well balanced is able to enhance self-discipline and good study habits; to develop students’ ______ and initiative.

31.

Образуйте от слова ACADEMY однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

It can also provide an opportunity to revise or complete classroom work, thus reinforcing what has been taught, to provide regular feedback on the students’ progress in learning and raise ______ skills and standards. Parents who are concerned with their kids’ homework get an opportunity to become engaged in the education of their children.

32.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) incident

2) occasion

3) event

4) accident


Amy

 

It was Christmas Eve. Amy had never before felt such a powerful energy on such an 32 _______.

Standing in the living room of the ranch house, Amy 33 _______ where Paul Chadwick really lived, since it was apparent he did not live there. Paul and Anna had not put much of a mark on the apartment, Amy reflected. The apartment was handsome but impersonal. She knew that the places where he was supposed to live were too tidy, too sleek, they 34 _______ like hotel suits. He had an office in the Towers apartment and one here, and in those she could see some marks of the man; but she saw none in the living rooms, dining rooms and bedrooms.

The décor was resolutely Western, its furnishings assembled to 35 _______ the effect. Only one item said something. Above the huge smoke-stained fieldstone fireplace here was a small photograph, a snapshot, actually, of a grim, solid man in his sixties. He wore a no-nonsense expression, glaring disapprovingly at the world but not at the photographer. If you knew what you were looking 36 _______ in the picture, or used a magnifying glass, you could identify a bottle of bourbon on the desk. On a table at his side were two candlestick telephones. That was Paul Chadwick the First. Amy 37 _______ to John and his sister Emily and said, ”Your father is not what I imagined he would be.” Amy had seen pictures of Paul Chadwick, so his appearance was no surprise. What she had not seen in his newspaper and magazine pictures was that he was aggressive, beyond doubt, but 38 _______ that he was easily, naturally charismatic.

33.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) wondered

2) wandered

3) guessed

4) informed


Amy

 

It was Christmas Eve. Amy had never before felt such a powerful energy on such an 32 _______.

Standing in the living room of the ranch house, Amy 33 _______ where Paul Chadwick really lived, since it was apparent he did not live there. Paul and Anna had not put much of a mark on the apartment, Amy reflected. The apartment was handsome but impersonal. She knew that the places where he was supposed to live were too tidy, too sleek, they 34 _______ like hotel suits. He had an office in the Towers apartment and one here, and in those she could see some marks of the man; but she saw none in the living rooms, dining rooms and bedrooms.

The décor was resolutely Western, its furnishings assembled to 35 _______ the effect. Only one item said something. Above the huge smoke-stained fieldstone fireplace here was a small photograph, a snapshot, actually, of a grim, solid man in his sixties. He wore a no-nonsense expression, glaring disapprovingly at the world but not at the photographer. If you knew what you were looking 36 _______ in the picture, or used a magnifying glass, you could identify a bottle of bourbon on the desk. On a table at his side were two candlestick telephones. That was Paul Chadwick the First. Amy 37 _______ to John and his sister Emily and said, ”Your father is not what I imagined he would be.” Amy had seen pictures of Paul Chadwick, so his appearance was no surprise. What she had not seen in his newspaper and magazine pictures was that he was aggressive, beyond doubt, but 38 _______ that he was easily, naturally charismatic.

34.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) viewed

2) glanced

3) looked

4) watched


Amy

 

It was Christmas Eve. Amy had never before felt such a powerful energy on such an 32 _______.

Standing in the living room of the ranch house, Amy 33 _______ where Paul Chadwick really lived, since it was apparent he did not live there. Paul and Anna had not put much of a mark on the apartment, Amy reflected. The apartment was handsome but impersonal. She knew that the places where he was supposed to live were too tidy, too sleek, they 34 _______ like hotel suits. He had an office in the Towers apartment and one here, and in those she could see some marks of the man; but she saw none in the living rooms, dining rooms and bedrooms.

The décor was resolutely Western, its furnishings assembled to 35 _______ the effect. Only one item said something. Above the huge smoke-stained fieldstone fireplace here was a small photograph, a snapshot, actually, of a grim, solid man in his sixties. He wore a no-nonsense expression, glaring disapprovingly at the world but not at the photographer. If you knew what you were looking 36 _______ in the picture, or used a magnifying glass, you could identify a bottle of bourbon on the desk. On a table at his side were two candlestick telephones. That was Paul Chadwick the First. Amy 37 _______ to John and his sister Emily and said, ”Your father is not what I imagined he would be.” Amy had seen pictures of Paul Chadwick, so his appearance was no surprise. What she had not seen in his newspaper and magazine pictures was that he was aggressive, beyond doubt, but 38 _______ that he was easily, naturally charismatic.

35.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) bring

2) fulfill

3) create

4) do


Amy

 

It was Christmas Eve. Amy had never before felt such a powerful energy on such an 32 _______.

Standing in the living room of the ranch house, Amy 33 _______ where Paul Chadwick really lived, since it was apparent he did not live there. Paul and Anna had not put much of a mark on the apartment, Amy reflected. The apartment was handsome but impersonal. She knew that the places where he was supposed to live were too tidy, too sleek, they 34 _______ like hotel suits. He had an office in the Towers apartment and one here, and in those she could see some marks of the man; but she saw none in the living rooms, dining rooms and bedrooms.

The décor was resolutely Western, its furnishings assembled to 35 _______ the effect. Only one item said something. Above the huge smoke-stained fieldstone fireplace here was a small photograph, a snapshot, actually, of a grim, solid man in his sixties. He wore a no-nonsense expression, glaring disapprovingly at the world but not at the photographer. If you knew what you were looking 36 _______ in the picture, or used a magnifying glass, you could identify a bottle of bourbon on the desk. On a table at his side were two candlestick telephones. That was Paul Chadwick the First. Amy 37 _______ to John and his sister Emily and said, ”Your father is not what I imagined he would be.” Amy had seen pictures of Paul Chadwick, so his appearance was no surprise. What she had not seen in his newspaper and magazine pictures was that he was aggressive, beyond doubt, but 38 _______ that he was easily, naturally charismatic.

36.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) after

2) for

3) out

4) on


Amy

 

It was Christmas Eve. Amy had never before felt such a powerful energy on such an 32 _______.

Standing in the living room of the ranch house, Amy 33 _______ where Paul Chadwick really lived, since it was apparent he did not live there. Paul and Anna had not put much of a mark on the apartment, Amy reflected. The apartment was handsome but impersonal. She knew that the places where he was supposed to live were too tidy, too sleek, they 34 _______ like hotel suits. He had an office in the Towers apartment and one here, and in those she could see some marks of the man; but she saw none in the living rooms, dining rooms and bedrooms.

The décor was resolutely Western, its furnishings assembled to 35 _______ the effect. Only one item said something. Above the huge smoke-stained fieldstone fireplace here was a small photograph, a snapshot, actually, of a grim, solid man in his sixties. He wore a no-nonsense expression, glaring disapprovingly at the world but not at the photographer. If you knew what you were looking 36 _______ in the picture, or used a magnifying glass, you could identify a bottle of bourbon on the desk. On a table at his side were two candlestick telephones. That was Paul Chadwick the First. Amy 37 _______ to John and his sister Emily and said, ”Your father is not what I imagined he would be.” Amy had seen pictures of Paul Chadwick, so his appearance was no surprise. What she had not seen in his newspaper and magazine pictures was that he was aggressive, beyond doubt, but 38 _______ that he was easily, naturally charismatic.

37.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) stoppеd

2) pushеd

3) pullеd

4) turnеd


Amy

 

It was Christmas Eve. Amy had never before felt such a powerful energy on such an 32 _______.

Standing in the living room of the ranch house, Amy 33 _______ where Paul Chadwick really lived, since it was apparent he did not live there. Paul and Anna had not put much of a mark on the apartment, Amy reflected. The apartment was handsome but impersonal. She knew that the places where he was supposed to live were too tidy, too sleek, they 34 _______ like hotel suits. He had an office in the Towers apartment and one here, and in those she could see some marks of the man; but she saw none in the living rooms, dining rooms and bedrooms.

The décor was resolutely Western, its furnishings assembled to 35 _______ the effect. Only one item said something. Above the huge smoke-stained fieldstone fireplace here was a small photograph, a snapshot, actually, of a grim, solid man in his sixties. He wore a no-nonsense expression, glaring disapprovingly at the world but not at the photographer. If you knew what you were looking 36 _______ in the picture, or used a magnifying glass, you could identify a bottle of bourbon on the desk. On a table at his side were two candlestick telephones. That was Paul Chadwick the First. Amy 37 _______ to John and his sister Emily and said, ”Your father is not what I imagined he would be.” Amy had seen pictures of Paul Chadwick, so his appearance was no surprise. What she had not seen in his newspaper and magazine pictures was that he was aggressive, beyond doubt, but 38 _______ that he was easily, naturally charismatic.

38.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) bеsidеs

2) apart

3) though

4) morеovеr


Amy

 

It was Christmas Eve. Amy had never before felt such a powerful energy on such an 32 _______.

Standing in the living room of the ranch house, Amy 33 _______ where Paul Chadwick really lived, since it was apparent he did not live there. Paul and Anna had not put much of a mark on the apartment, Amy reflected. The apartment was handsome but impersonal. She knew that the places where he was supposed to live were too tidy, too sleek, they 34 _______ like hotel suits. He had an office in the Towers apartment and one here, and in those she could see some marks of the man; but she saw none in the living rooms, dining rooms and bedrooms.

The décor was resolutely Western, its furnishings assembled to 35 _______ the effect. Only one item said something. Above the huge smoke-stained fieldstone fireplace here was a small photograph, a snapshot, actually, of a grim, solid man in his sixties. He wore a no-nonsense expression, glaring disapprovingly at the world but not at the photographer. If you knew what you were looking 36 _______ in the picture, or used a magnifying glass, you could identify a bottle of bourbon on the desk. On a table at his side were two candlestick telephones. That was Paul Chadwick the First. Amy 37 _______ to John and his sister Emily and said, ”Your father is not what I imagined he would be.” Amy had seen pictures of Paul Chadwick, so his appearance was no surprise. What she had not seen in his newspaper and magazine pictures was that he was aggressive, beyond doubt, but 38 _______ that he was easily, naturally charismatic.

39.

You have received a letter from your English-speaking pen-friend Tom who writes:

 

... Last summer my parents and I went hiking to the mountains. We spent the whole week together and enjoyed it very much. How often do you take active holidays? Who do you think is the best company for you? What extreme sports would you like to try, if any, and why?

Last month our English class got an interesting project. We wrote a paper about interesting events in the past of our country ...

 

Write a letter to Tom. In your letter answer her questions, ask 3 questions about his project paper. Write 100—140 words. Remember the rules of letter writing. You have 20 minutes to do this task.

40.

Выберите только ОДНО из двух предложенных высказываний и выразите своё мнение по предложенной проблеме согласно данному плану.

 

Comment on one of the following statements.

 

1. Some people think that to be a success you need talent; others believe that hard work can compensate for the lack of it.

2. Virtual Internet communication results in losing real-life social skills.

 

What is your opinion? Do you agree with this statement? Write 200–250 words. Use the following plan:

− make an introduction (state the problem)

− express your personal opinion and give 2–3 reasons for your opinion

− express an opposing opinion and give 1–2 reasons for this opposing opinion

− explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion

− make a conclusion restating your position

41.

Imagine that you are preparing a project with your friend. You have found some interesting material for the presentation and you want to read this text to your friend. You have 1.5 minutes to read the text silently, then be ready to read it out aloud. You will not have more than 1.5 minutes to read it.

 

The ostrich is the bird that lays the smallest egg for its size. Although it is the largest single cell in nature, an ostrich egg is less than 2 per cent of the weight of the mother. A wren’s egg, by comparison, is 13 per cent of its weight. The largest egg in comparison with the size of the bird is that of the Little Spotted kiwi. Its egg accounts for 26 per cent of its own weight.

An ostrich egg weighs as much as twenty-four hen’s eggs; to soft-boil one takes forty-five minutes. Queen Victoria tucked into one for breakfast and declared it among the best meals she had ever eaten. The largest egg laid by any animal – including the dinosaurs – belonged to the elephant bird of Madagascar, which became extinct in 1700. It was ten times the size of an ostrich egg, nine litres in volume and the equivalent of 180 chicken’s eggs.

42.

Study the advertisement.

 

You are considering buying a cake and now you’d like to get more information. In 1.5 minutes you are to ask five direct questions to find out about the following:

1) types of cakes on sale

2) cakes with fresh berries

3) weight

4) price

5) delivery

You have 20 seconds to ask each question.

43.

These are photos from your photo album. Choose one photo to describe to your friend.

 

 

You will have to start speaking in 1.5 minutes and will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). In your talk remember to speak about:

• where and when the photo was taken

• what/who is in the photo

• what is happening

• why you keep the photo in your album

• why you decided to show the picture to your friend

You have to talk continuously, starting with:

"I’ve chosen photo number… "

44.

Study the two photographs. In 1.5 minutes be ready to compare and contrast the photographs:

 

• give a brief description of the photos (action, location)

• say what the pictures have in common

• say in what way the pictures are different

• say what kind of work presentedin the photos you prefer

• explain why

 

You will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). You have to talk continuously.