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Вариант № 983638

1.

Вы услышите 6 высказываний. Установите соответствие между высказываниями каждого говорящего A–F и утверждениями, данными в списке 1–7. Используйте каждое утверждение, обозначенное соответствующей цифрой, только один раз. В задании есть одно лишнее утверждение. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

1. I eat a lot trying to forget my problems.

2. I cannot lose weight as I combine exercising and eating unhealthy food.

3. I have gained weight after changing my habits.

4. I would like to lose weight without changing my habits radically.

5. I feel very unhappy because I cannot help eating unhealthy food.

6. I expected to gain weight but in fact I haven’t.

7. I don’t have any weight problems in spite of eating whatever I want.

 

 

 

ГоворящийABCDEF
Утверждение

2.

Вы услышите диалог. Определите, какие из приведённых утверждений А–G соответствуют содержанию текста (1 – True), какие не соответствуют (2 – False) и о чём в тексте не сказано, то есть на основании текста нельзя дать ни положительного, ни отрицательного ответа (3 – Not stated). Занесите номер выбранного Вами варианта ответа в таблицу. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

A) Ivy previously believed she could never learn to use computers.

B) Ivy’s husband Fred is impressed by Paul.

C) Fred has been on a computer course before.

D) Paul refused to take Fred as his trainee.

E) James and Katie will do two evenings a week in September.

F) CLAIT is easier than the Office Skills course.

G) Ivy plans to finish both CLAIT and Office Skills courses by the end of winter.

 

Запишите в ответ цифры, расположив их в порядке, соответствующем буквам:

ABCDEFG
       

3.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Raymond began to understand the real value of James Bond books after

 

1) getting a chance to read them all.

2) seeing his first Bond movie.

3) reading them for the second time.

4.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Thanks to the Internet, today’s Bond fans

 

1) have become much more united than they used to be.

2) can publish more magazines about Bond.

3) hold conventions devoted to Bond more frequently.

5.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Raymond is still a Bond fan, but now he

 

1) doesn’t like new Bond movies.

2) writes fewer articles about Bond.

3) has a wider sphere of interests.

6.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Raymond believes that Ian Fleming would have

 

1) liked recent Bond movies if he had seen them.

2) been surprised at a long-term success of Bond series.

3) enjoyed the way James Bond is portrayed now.

7.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

According to Raymond, books and films about spies will

 

1) be interesting only to Bond fans.

2) only be associated with the cold war.

3) always be attractive to people.

8.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Now that Raymond has stopped writing about Bond he

 

1) still has enough money not to work anymore.

2) has an opportunity to travel the world.

3) feels that he has got rid of great pressure.

9.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Raymond’s advice to the next Bond writer is to

 

1) look through all Bond websites.

2) get ready for some really hard work.

3) understand what Bond fans want.

10.

Установите соответствие между заголовками 1–8 и текстами A–G. Запишите свои ответы в таблицу. Используйте каждую цифру только один раз. В задании есть один лишний заголовок.

 

1. Reason for extension

2. Presents begin to enrich the collection

3. New collections for the new building

4. New field for the old museum

5. Shift towards history

6. First famous exhibits

7. One on the basis of two

8. Location of the museum

 

A. The present Ashmolean Museum was created in 1908 by combining two ancient Oxford institutions: the University Art Collection and the original Ashmolean Museum. The older partner in this merger, the University Art Collection, was based for many years in what is now the Upper Reading Room in the Bodleian Library.

 

B. The collection began modestly in the 1620s with a handful of portraits and curiosities displayed in a small room on the upper floor. In the 17th century there were added notable collections of coins and medals later incorporated into the Ashmolean coin collection. The objects of curiosity included Guy Fawkes' lantern and a sword given by the Pope to Henry VIII, and a number of more exotic items.

 

C. In the 1660s and 70s, the collection grew rapidly and, in 1683, the Bodleian Gallery was left to develop as a museum of art. At first, it was a gallery of portraits of distinguished contemporaries, but from the mid 1660s, it began to acquire a more historical perspective with the addition of images of people from the past: college founders, scientists, soldiers, monarchs, writers and artists.

 

D. In the eighteenth century, several painters donated self-portraits. They also added a number of landscapes, historical paintings and scenes from contemporary life. Other donors, former members of the University, added collections of Old Masters so that by the early nineteenth century, it had become an art gallery of general interest and an essential point of call on the tourist map. The public was admitted on payment of a small charge. Catalogues were available at the entrance and the paintings were well displayed in a large gallery.

 

E. It was only with the gift of a collection of ancient Greek and Roman statuary from the Countess of Pomfret in 1755 that the need for a new art gallery became urgent. The marble figures were too heavy to be placed in an upstairs gallery and were installed in a dark ground-floor room in the library pending the creation of a new museum.

 

F. Before the new museum was finished, a major group of drawings by Raphael and Michelangelo was purchased by public subscription for the new galleries, establishing the importance of the Oxford museum as a centre for the study of Old Master drawings. The new museum also attracted gifts of paintings. In 1851, a collection of early Italian paintings, which included Uccello's "Hunt in the Forestone of the museum's major works of art was presented.

 

G. In the 1850s, the University established a new Natural History Museum, which is now known as the Oxford University Museum of Natural History. And all the natural history specimens from the Ashmolean were transferred to the new institution. Having lost what had become the most important element in its collection, the Ashmolean was to find a major new role in the emerging field of archaeology.

 

 

ТекстABCDEFG
Заголовок

11.

Прочитайте текст и заполните пропуски A–F частями предложений, обозначенными цифрами 1–7. Одна из частей в списке 1–7 — лишняя. Занесите цифры, обозначающие соответствующие части предложений, в таблицу.

 

 

The Power of ‘Hello’

 

I work at a company where there are hundreds of employees. I know most of them and almost all of them know me. It is all based on one simple principle: I believe every single person deserves to be acknowledged, A ______ .

When I was about 10 years old, I was walking down the street with my mother. She stopped to speak to Mr. Lee. I knew I could see Mr. Lee any time around the neighborhood, В ______ .

After we passed Mr. Lee, my mother said something that has stuck with me from that day until now. She said, ‘You let that be the last time you ever walk by somebody and not open up your mouth to speak, because even a dog can wag its tail С ______ . That phrase sounds simple, but it has been a guidepost for me and the foundation of who I am. I started to see that when I spoke to someone, they spoke back. And that felt good. It is not just something I believe in — D ______ . I believe that every person deserves to feel someone acknowledges their presence, no matter how unimportant they may be.

At work, I always used to say ‘hello’ to the founder of the company and ask him how our business was doing. But I was also speaking to the people in the cafe, and asked how their children were doing. I remembered after a few years of passing by the founder, I had the courage to ask him for a meeting. We had a great talk.

At a certain point, I asked him E ______ . He said, ‘If you want to, you can get all the way to this seat.’ I have become vice president, but that has not changed the way I approach people. I speak to everyone I see, no matter where I am. I have learned that speaking to people creates a pathway into their world, F ______ .

 

1. it has become a way of life.

2. when it passes you on the street.

3. when you see him and talk to him.

4. and it lets them come into mine, too.

5. so I did not pay any attention to him.

6. however small or simple the greeting is.

7. how far he thought I could go in his company.

 

ПропускABCDEF
Часть предложения

12.

The first time Sally travelled by train was when she

 

1) had to move to her aunt Alice.

2) had a summer vacation at school.

3) went to Pittsburgh for the first time in her life.

4) visited her aunt Alice together with aunt Winnie.


First Train Trip

I must have been about eight when I made my first train trip. I think I was in second grade at that time. It was midsummer, hot and wet in central Kansas, and time for my aunt Winnie’s annual vacation from the store, where she worked as a clerk six days a week. She invited me to join her on a trip to Pittsburgh, fifty miles away, to see her sister, my aunt Alice. ‘Sally, would you like to go there by train or by car?’ aunt Winnie asked. ‘Oh, please, by train, aunt Winnie, dear! We’ve been there by car three times already!’

 

Alice was one of my favourite relatives and I was delighted to be invited to her house. As I was the youngest niece in Mother’s big family, the aunties all tended to spoil me and Alice was no exception. She kept a boarding house for college students, a two-storey, brown brick building with comfortable, nicely decorated rooms at the corner of 1200 Kearney Avenue. She was also a world-class cook, which kept her boarding house full of young people. It seemed to me that their life was so exciting and joyful.

 

Since I’d never ridden a train before, I became more and more excited as the magic day drew near. I kept questioning Mother about train travel, but she just said, ‘Wait. You’ll see.’ For an eight-year-old, waiting was really difficult, but finally the big day arrived. Mother had helped me pack the night before, and my little suitcase was full with summer sundresses, shorts and blouses, underwear and pyjamas. I was reading Billy Whiskers, a fantastic story about a goat that once made a train trip to New York, and I had put that in as well. It was almost midnight when I could go to bed at last.

 

We arrived at the station early, purchased our tickets and found our car. I was fascinated by the face-to-face seats so some passengers could ride backwards. Why would anyone, I thought, want to see where they’d been? I only wanted to see what lay ahead for me.

 

Finally, the conductor shouted, ‘All aboard!’ to the people on the platform. They climbed into the cars, the engineer blew the whistle and clanged the bell, and we pulled out of the station.

 

This train stopped at every town between my home in Solomon and Pittsburgh. It was known as the ‘milk train’ because at one time it had delivered goods as well as passengers to these villages. I looked eagerly at the signs at each station. I’d been through all these towns by car, but this was different. The shaky ride of the coaches, the soft brown plush seats, the smells of the engine drifting back down the track and in through the open windows made this trip far more exotic.

 

The conductor, with his black uniform and shiny hat, the twinkling signals that told the engineer when to stop and go, thrilled me. To an adult, the trip must have seemed painfully slow, but I enjoyed every minute.

 

Aunt Winnie had packed a lunch for us to eat along the way as there was no dining car in the train. I was dying to know just what was in that big shopping bag she carried, but she, too, said, ‘Wait. You’ll see.’ Midway, Aunt Winnie pulled down her shopping bag from the luggage rack above our seats. My eyes widened as she opened it and began to take out its contents. I had expected lunch- meat sandwiches, but instead there was a container of fried chicken, two hardboiled eggs, bread and butter wrapped in waxed paper, crisp radishes and slim green onions from Winnie’s garden, as well as rosy sliced tomatoes. She had brought paper plates, paper cups and some of the ‘everyday’ silverware. A large bottle of cold tea was well wrapped in a dishtowel; the ice had melted, but it was still chilly. I cautiously balanced my plate on my knees and ate, wiping my lips and fingers with a large paper napkin. This was living!

 

When we had cleaned our plates, Aunt Winnie looked into the bag one more time. The best treat of all appeared — homemade chocolate cakes! Another cup of cold tea washed these down and then we carefully returned the remains of the food and silverware to the bag, which Aunt Winnie put into the corner by her feet.

 

‘Almost there,’ said my aunt, looking out of the window at the scenery passing by. And sure enough, as we pulled into the Pittsburgh station we immediately caught sight of aunt Alice, waiting for us, a smile like the sun lighting up her face, arms wide open. We got off the train and she led us past the taxi rank and the bus stop to her car that was parked near the station. And all the way to her home she was asking about my impressions of my first train trip and I could hardly find the words to express all the thrill and excitement that filled me.

13.

Aunt Alice made her living by

 

1) working as a cook.

2) keeping a boarding house.

3) decorating houses.

4) working as a teacher at college.


First Train Trip

I must have been about eight when I made my first train trip. I think I was in second grade at that time. It was midsummer, hot and wet in central Kansas, and time for my aunt Winnie’s annual vacation from the store, where she worked as a clerk six days a week. She invited me to join her on a trip to Pittsburgh, fifty miles away, to see her sister, my aunt Alice. ‘Sally, would you like to go there by train or by car?’ aunt Winnie asked. ‘Oh, please, by train, aunt Winnie, dear! We’ve been there by car three times already!’

 

Alice was one of my favourite relatives and I was delighted to be invited to her house. As I was the youngest niece in Mother’s big family, the aunties all tended to spoil me and Alice was no exception. She kept a boarding house for college students, a two-storey, brown brick building with comfortable, nicely decorated rooms at the corner of 1200 Kearney Avenue. She was also a world-class cook, which kept her boarding house full of young people. It seemed to me that their life was so exciting and joyful.

 

Since I’d never ridden a train before, I became more and more excited as the magic day drew near. I kept questioning Mother about train travel, but she just said, ‘Wait. You’ll see.’ For an eight-year-old, waiting was really difficult, but finally the big day arrived. Mother had helped me pack the night before, and my little suitcase was full with summer sundresses, shorts and blouses, underwear and pyjamas. I was reading Billy Whiskers, a fantastic story about a goat that once made a train trip to New York, and I had put that in as well. It was almost midnight when I could go to bed at last.

 

We arrived at the station early, purchased our tickets and found our car. I was fascinated by the face-to-face seats so some passengers could ride backwards. Why would anyone, I thought, want to see where they’d been? I only wanted to see what lay ahead for me.

 

Finally, the conductor shouted, ‘All aboard!’ to the people on the platform. They climbed into the cars, the engineer blew the whistle and clanged the bell, and we pulled out of the station.

 

This train stopped at every town between my home in Solomon and Pittsburgh. It was known as the ‘milk train’ because at one time it had delivered goods as well as passengers to these villages. I looked eagerly at the signs at each station. I’d been through all these towns by car, but this was different. The shaky ride of the coaches, the soft brown plush seats, the smells of the engine drifting back down the track and in through the open windows made this trip far more exotic.

 

The conductor, with his black uniform and shiny hat, the twinkling signals that told the engineer when to stop and go, thrilled me. To an adult, the trip must have seemed painfully slow, but I enjoyed every minute.

 

Aunt Winnie had packed a lunch for us to eat along the way as there was no dining car in the train. I was dying to know just what was in that big shopping bag she carried, but she, too, said, ‘Wait. You’ll see.’ Midway, Aunt Winnie pulled down her shopping bag from the luggage rack above our seats. My eyes widened as she opened it and began to take out its contents. I had expected lunch- meat sandwiches, but instead there was a container of fried chicken, two hardboiled eggs, bread and butter wrapped in waxed paper, crisp radishes and slim green onions from Winnie’s garden, as well as rosy sliced tomatoes. She had brought paper plates, paper cups and some of the ‘everyday’ silverware. A large bottle of cold tea was well wrapped in a dishtowel; the ice had melted, but it was still chilly. I cautiously balanced my plate on my knees and ate, wiping my lips and fingers with a large paper napkin. This was living!

 

When we had cleaned our plates, Aunt Winnie looked into the bag one more time. The best treat of all appeared — homemade chocolate cakes! Another cup of cold tea washed these down and then we carefully returned the remains of the food and silverware to the bag, which Aunt Winnie put into the corner by her feet.

 

‘Almost there,’ said my aunt, looking out of the window at the scenery passing by. And sure enough, as we pulled into the Pittsburgh station we immediately caught sight of aunt Alice, waiting for us, a smile like the sun lighting up her face, arms wide open. We got off the train and she led us past the taxi rank and the bus stop to her car that was parked near the station. And all the way to her home she was asking about my impressions of my first train trip and I could hardly find the words to express all the thrill and excitement that filled me.

14.

Sally was waiting for her first train trip so impatiently that she

 

1) packed her things long before the trip.

2) lost her appetite a week before the trip.

3) asked her Mother many questions about train trips.

4) couldn’t sleep the night before the trip.


First Train Trip

I must have been about eight when I made my first train trip. I think I was in second grade at that time. It was midsummer, hot and wet in central Kansas, and time for my aunt Winnie’s annual vacation from the store, where she worked as a clerk six days a week. She invited me to join her on a trip to Pittsburgh, fifty miles away, to see her sister, my aunt Alice. ‘Sally, would you like to go there by train or by car?’ aunt Winnie asked. ‘Oh, please, by train, aunt Winnie, dear! We’ve been there by car three times already!’

 

Alice was one of my favourite relatives and I was delighted to be invited to her house. As I was the youngest niece in Mother’s big family, the aunties all tended to spoil me and Alice was no exception. She kept a boarding house for college students, a two-storey, brown brick building with comfortable, nicely decorated rooms at the corner of 1200 Kearney Avenue. She was also a world-class cook, which kept her boarding house full of young people. It seemed to me that their life was so exciting and joyful.

 

Since I’d never ridden a train before, I became more and more excited as the magic day drew near. I kept questioning Mother about train travel, but she just said, ‘Wait. You’ll see.’ For an eight-year-old, waiting was really difficult, but finally the big day arrived. Mother had helped me pack the night before, and my little suitcase was full with summer sundresses, shorts and blouses, underwear and pyjamas. I was reading Billy Whiskers, a fantastic story about a goat that once made a train trip to New York, and I had put that in as well. It was almost midnight when I could go to bed at last.

 

We arrived at the station early, purchased our tickets and found our car. I was fascinated by the face-to-face seats so some passengers could ride backwards. Why would anyone, I thought, want to see where they’d been? I only wanted to see what lay ahead for me.

 

Finally, the conductor shouted, ‘All aboard!’ to the people on the platform. They climbed into the cars, the engineer blew the whistle and clanged the bell, and we pulled out of the station.

 

This train stopped at every town between my home in Solomon and Pittsburgh. It was known as the ‘milk train’ because at one time it had delivered goods as well as passengers to these villages. I looked eagerly at the signs at each station. I’d been through all these towns by car, but this was different. The shaky ride of the coaches, the soft brown plush seats, the smells of the engine drifting back down the track and in through the open windows made this trip far more exotic.

 

The conductor, with his black uniform and shiny hat, the twinkling signals that told the engineer when to stop and go, thrilled me. To an adult, the trip must have seemed painfully slow, but I enjoyed every minute.

 

Aunt Winnie had packed a lunch for us to eat along the way as there was no dining car in the train. I was dying to know just what was in that big shopping bag she carried, but she, too, said, ‘Wait. You’ll see.’ Midway, Aunt Winnie pulled down her shopping bag from the luggage rack above our seats. My eyes widened as she opened it and began to take out its contents. I had expected lunch- meat sandwiches, but instead there was a container of fried chicken, two hardboiled eggs, bread and butter wrapped in waxed paper, crisp radishes and slim green onions from Winnie’s garden, as well as rosy sliced tomatoes. She had brought paper plates, paper cups and some of the ‘everyday’ silverware. A large bottle of cold tea was well wrapped in a dishtowel; the ice had melted, but it was still chilly. I cautiously balanced my plate on my knees and ate, wiping my lips and fingers with a large paper napkin. This was living!

 

When we had cleaned our plates, Aunt Winnie looked into the bag one more time. The best treat of all appeared — homemade chocolate cakes! Another cup of cold tea washed these down and then we carefully returned the remains of the food and silverware to the bag, which Aunt Winnie put into the corner by her feet.

 

‘Almost there,’ said my aunt, looking out of the window at the scenery passing by. And sure enough, as we pulled into the Pittsburgh station we immediately caught sight of aunt Alice, waiting for us, a smile like the sun lighting up her face, arms wide open. We got off the train and she led us past the taxi rank and the bus stop to her car that was parked near the station. And all the way to her home she was asking about my impressions of my first train trip and I could hardly find the words to express all the thrill and excitement that filled me.

15.

Sally didn’t like the idea of riding backwards because

 

1) it could make her sick.

2) she could miss her station.

3) she could miss .the conductor.

4) she wanted to see where she was going.


First Train Trip

I must have been about eight when I made my first train trip. I think I was in second grade at that time. It was midsummer, hot and wet in central Kansas, and time for my aunt Winnie’s annual vacation from the store, where she worked as a clerk six days a week. She invited me to join her on a trip to Pittsburgh, fifty miles away, to see her sister, my aunt Alice. ‘Sally, would you like to go there by train or by car?’ aunt Winnie asked. ‘Oh, please, by train, aunt Winnie, dear! We’ve been there by car three times already!’

 

Alice was one of my favourite relatives and I was delighted to be invited to her house. As I was the youngest niece in Mother’s big family, the aunties all tended to spoil me and Alice was no exception. She kept a boarding house for college students, a two-storey, brown brick building with comfortable, nicely decorated rooms at the corner of 1200 Kearney Avenue. She was also a world-class cook, which kept her boarding house full of young people. It seemed to me that their life was so exciting and joyful.

 

Since I’d never ridden a train before, I became more and more excited as the magic day drew near. I kept questioning Mother about train travel, but she just said, ‘Wait. You’ll see.’ For an eight-year-old, waiting was really difficult, but finally the big day arrived. Mother had helped me pack the night before, and my little suitcase was full with summer sundresses, shorts and blouses, underwear and pyjamas. I was reading Billy Whiskers, a fantastic story about a goat that once made a train trip to New York, and I had put that in as well. It was almost midnight when I could go to bed at last.

 

We arrived at the station early, purchased our tickets and found our car. I was fascinated by the face-to-face seats so some passengers could ride backwards. Why would anyone, I thought, want to see where they’d been? I only wanted to see what lay ahead for me.

 

Finally, the conductor shouted, ‘All aboard!’ to the people on the platform. They climbed into the cars, the engineer blew the whistle and clanged the bell, and we pulled out of the station.

 

This train stopped at every town between my home in Solomon and Pittsburgh. It was known as the ‘milk train’ because at one time it had delivered goods as well as passengers to these villages. I looked eagerly at the signs at each station. I’d been through all these towns by car, but this was different. The shaky ride of the coaches, the soft brown plush seats, the smells of the engine drifting back down the track and in through the open windows made this trip far more exotic.

 

The conductor, with his black uniform and shiny hat, the twinkling signals that told the engineer when to stop and go, thrilled me. To an adult, the trip must have seemed painfully slow, but I enjoyed every minute.

 

Aunt Winnie had packed a lunch for us to eat along the way as there was no dining car in the train. I was dying to know just what was in that big shopping bag she carried, but she, too, said, ‘Wait. You’ll see.’ Midway, Aunt Winnie pulled down her shopping bag from the luggage rack above our seats. My eyes widened as she opened it and began to take out its contents. I had expected lunch- meat sandwiches, but instead there was a container of fried chicken, two hardboiled eggs, bread and butter wrapped in waxed paper, crisp radishes and slim green onions from Winnie’s garden, as well as rosy sliced tomatoes. She had brought paper plates, paper cups and some of the ‘everyday’ silverware. A large bottle of cold tea was well wrapped in a dishtowel; the ice had melted, but it was still chilly. I cautiously balanced my plate on my knees and ate, wiping my lips and fingers with a large paper napkin. This was living!

 

When we had cleaned our plates, Aunt Winnie looked into the bag one more time. The best treat of all appeared — homemade chocolate cakes! Another cup of cold tea washed these down and then we carefully returned the remains of the food and silverware to the bag, which Aunt Winnie put into the corner by her feet.

 

‘Almost there,’ said my aunt, looking out of the window at the scenery passing by. And sure enough, as we pulled into the Pittsburgh station we immediately caught sight of aunt Alice, waiting for us, a smile like the sun lighting up her face, arms wide open. We got off the train and she led us past the taxi rank and the bus stop to her car that was parked near the station. And all the way to her home she was asking about my impressions of my first train trip and I could hardly find the words to express all the thrill and excitement that filled me.

16.

The trip to Pittsburgh by train seemed so exotic to Sally because

 

1) she had never travelled so far from her native town.

2) travelling by train was very different from a car ride.

3) she had never travelled in comfort.

4) she had never travelled without her parents.


First Train Trip

I must have been about eight when I made my first train trip. I think I was in second grade at that time. It was midsummer, hot and wet in central Kansas, and time for my aunt Winnie’s annual vacation from the store, where she worked as a clerk six days a week. She invited me to join her on a trip to Pittsburgh, fifty miles away, to see her sister, my aunt Alice. ‘Sally, would you like to go there by train or by car?’ aunt Winnie asked. ‘Oh, please, by train, aunt Winnie, dear! We’ve been there by car three times already!’

 

Alice was one of my favourite relatives and I was delighted to be invited to her house. As I was the youngest niece in Mother’s big family, the aunties all tended to spoil me and Alice was no exception. She kept a boarding house for college students, a two-storey, brown brick building with comfortable, nicely decorated rooms at the corner of 1200 Kearney Avenue. She was also a world-class cook, which kept her boarding house full of young people. It seemed to me that their life was so exciting and joyful.

 

Since I’d never ridden a train before, I became more and more excited as the magic day drew near. I kept questioning Mother about train travel, but she just said, ‘Wait. You’ll see.’ For an eight-year-old, waiting was really difficult, but finally the big day arrived. Mother had helped me pack the night before, and my little suitcase was full with summer sundresses, shorts and blouses, underwear and pyjamas. I was reading Billy Whiskers, a fantastic story about a goat that once made a train trip to New York, and I had put that in as well. It was almost midnight when I could go to bed at last.

 

We arrived at the station early, purchased our tickets and found our car. I was fascinated by the face-to-face seats so some passengers could ride backwards. Why would anyone, I thought, want to see where they’d been? I only wanted to see what lay ahead for me.

 

Finally, the conductor shouted, ‘All aboard!’ to the people on the platform. They climbed into the cars, the engineer blew the whistle and clanged the bell, and we pulled out of the station.

 

This train stopped at every town between my home in Solomon and Pittsburgh. It was known as the ‘milk train’ because at one time it had delivered goods as well as passengers to these villages. I looked eagerly at the signs at each station. I’d been through all these towns by car, but this was different. The shaky ride of the coaches, the soft brown plush seats, the smells of the engine drifting back down the track and in through the open windows made this trip far more exotic.

 

The conductor, with his black uniform and shiny hat, the twinkling signals that told the engineer when to stop and go, thrilled me. To an adult, the trip must have seemed painfully slow, but I enjoyed every minute.

 

Aunt Winnie had packed a lunch for us to eat along the way as there was no dining car in the train. I was dying to know just what was in that big shopping bag she carried, but she, too, said, ‘Wait. You’ll see.’ Midway, Aunt Winnie pulled down her shopping bag from the luggage rack above our seats. My eyes widened as she opened it and began to take out its contents. I had expected lunch- meat sandwiches, but instead there was a container of fried chicken, two hardboiled eggs, bread and butter wrapped in waxed paper, crisp radishes and slim green onions from Winnie’s garden, as well as rosy sliced tomatoes. She had brought paper plates, paper cups and some of the ‘everyday’ silverware. A large bottle of cold tea was well wrapped in a dishtowel; the ice had melted, but it was still chilly. I cautiously balanced my plate on my knees and ate, wiping my lips and fingers with a large paper napkin. This was living!

 

When we had cleaned our plates, Aunt Winnie looked into the bag one more time. The best treat of all appeared — homemade chocolate cakes! Another cup of cold tea washed these down and then we carefully returned the remains of the food and silverware to the bag, which Aunt Winnie put into the corner by her feet.

 

‘Almost there,’ said my aunt, looking out of the window at the scenery passing by. And sure enough, as we pulled into the Pittsburgh station we immediately caught sight of aunt Alice, waiting for us, a smile like the sun lighting up her face, arms wide open. We got off the train and she led us past the taxi rank and the bus stop to her car that was parked near the station. And all the way to her home she was asking about my impressions of my first train trip and I could hardly find the words to express all the thrill and excitement that filled me.

17.

Sally thought that at lunchtime they would have

 

1) meat sandwiches.

2) bread and butter with coffee.

3) fried chicken, eggs and vegetables.

4) tea with chocolate cakes.


First Train Trip

I must have been about eight when I made my first train trip. I think I was in second grade at that time. It was midsummer, hot and wet in central Kansas, and time for my aunt Winnie’s annual vacation from the store, where she worked as a clerk six days a week. She invited me to join her on a trip to Pittsburgh, fifty miles away, to see her sister, my aunt Alice. ‘Sally, would you like to go there by train or by car?’ aunt Winnie asked. ‘Oh, please, by train, aunt Winnie, dear! We’ve been there by car three times already!’

 

Alice was one of my favourite relatives and I was delighted to be invited to her house. As I was the youngest niece in Mother’s big family, the aunties all tended to spoil me and Alice was no exception. She kept a boarding house for college students, a two-storey, brown brick building with comfortable, nicely decorated rooms at the corner of 1200 Kearney Avenue. She was also a world-class cook, which kept her boarding house full of young people. It seemed to me that their life was so exciting and joyful.

 

Since I’d never ridden a train before, I became more and more excited as the magic day drew near. I kept questioning Mother about train travel, but she just said, ‘Wait. You’ll see.’ For an eight-year-old, waiting was really difficult, but finally the big day arrived. Mother had helped me pack the night before, and my little suitcase was full with summer sundresses, shorts and blouses, underwear and pyjamas. I was reading Billy Whiskers, a fantastic story about a goat that once made a train trip to New York, and I had put that in as well. It was almost midnight when I could go to bed at last.

 

We arrived at the station early, purchased our tickets and found our car. I was fascinated by the face-to-face seats so some passengers could ride backwards. Why would anyone, I thought, want to see where they’d been? I only wanted to see what lay ahead for me.

 

Finally, the conductor shouted, ‘All aboard!’ to the people on the platform. They climbed into the cars, the engineer blew the whistle and clanged the bell, and we pulled out of the station.

 

This train stopped at every town between my home in Solomon and Pittsburgh. It was known as the ‘milk train’ because at one time it had delivered goods as well as passengers to these villages. I looked eagerly at the signs at each station. I’d been through all these towns by car, but this was different. The shaky ride of the coaches, the soft brown plush seats, the smells of the engine drifting back down the track and in through the open windows made this trip far more exotic.

 

The conductor, with his black uniform and shiny hat, the twinkling signals that told the engineer when to stop and go, thrilled me. To an adult, the trip must have seemed painfully slow, but I enjoyed every minute.

 

Aunt Winnie had packed a lunch for us to eat along the way as there was no dining car in the train. I was dying to know just what was in that big shopping bag she carried, but she, too, said, ‘Wait. You’ll see.’ Midway, Aunt Winnie pulled down her shopping bag from the luggage rack above our seats. My eyes widened as she opened it and began to take out its contents. I had expected lunch- meat sandwiches, but instead there was a container of fried chicken, two hardboiled eggs, bread and butter wrapped in waxed paper, crisp radishes and slim green onions from Winnie’s garden, as well as rosy sliced tomatoes. She had brought paper plates, paper cups and some of the ‘everyday’ silverware. A large bottle of cold tea was well wrapped in a dishtowel; the ice had melted, but it was still chilly. I cautiously balanced my plate on my knees and ate, wiping my lips and fingers with a large paper napkin. This was living!

 

When we had cleaned our plates, Aunt Winnie looked into the bag one more time. The best treat of all appeared — homemade chocolate cakes! Another cup of cold tea washed these down and then we carefully returned the remains of the food and silverware to the bag, which Aunt Winnie put into the corner by her feet.

 

‘Almost there,’ said my aunt, looking out of the window at the scenery passing by. And sure enough, as we pulled into the Pittsburgh station we immediately caught sight of aunt Alice, waiting for us, a smile like the sun lighting up her face, arms wide open. We got off the train and she led us past the taxi rank and the bus stop to her car that was parked near the station. And all the way to her home she was asking about my impressions of my first train trip and I could hardly find the words to express all the thrill and excitement that filled me.

18.

Aunt Alice was waiting for Sally and aunt Winnie

 

1) at home.

2) in her car.

3) on the platform.

4) at the bus stop.


First Train Trip

I must have been about eight when I made my first train trip. I think I was in second grade at that time. It was midsummer, hot and wet in central Kansas, and time for my aunt Winnie’s annual vacation from the store, where she worked as a clerk six days a week. She invited me to join her on a trip to Pittsburgh, fifty miles away, to see her sister, my aunt Alice. ‘Sally, would you like to go there by train or by car?’ aunt Winnie asked. ‘Oh, please, by train, aunt Winnie, dear! We’ve been there by car three times already!’

 

Alice was one of my favourite relatives and I was delighted to be invited to her house. As I was the youngest niece in Mother’s big family, the aunties all tended to spoil me and Alice was no exception. She kept a boarding house for college students, a two-storey, brown brick building with comfortable, nicely decorated rooms at the corner of 1200 Kearney Avenue. She was also a world-class cook, which kept her boarding house full of young people. It seemed to me that their life was so exciting and joyful.

 

Since I’d never ridden a train before, I became more and more excited as the magic day drew near. I kept questioning Mother about train travel, but she just said, ‘Wait. You’ll see.’ For an eight-year-old, waiting was really difficult, but finally the big day arrived. Mother had helped me pack the night before, and my little suitcase was full with summer sundresses, shorts and blouses, underwear and pyjamas. I was reading Billy Whiskers, a fantastic story about a goat that once made a train trip to New York, and I had put that in as well. It was almost midnight when I could go to bed at last.

 

We arrived at the station early, purchased our tickets and found our car. I was fascinated by the face-to-face seats so some passengers could ride backwards. Why would anyone, I thought, want to see where they’d been? I only wanted to see what lay ahead for me.

 

Finally, the conductor shouted, ‘All aboard!’ to the people on the platform. They climbed into the cars, the engineer blew the whistle and clanged the bell, and we pulled out of the station.

 

This train stopped at every town between my home in Solomon and Pittsburgh. It was known as the ‘milk train’ because at one time it had delivered goods as well as passengers to these villages. I looked eagerly at the signs at each station. I’d been through all these towns by car, but this was different. The shaky ride of the coaches, the soft brown plush seats, the smells of the engine drifting back down the track and in through the open windows made this trip far more exotic.

 

The conductor, with his black uniform and shiny hat, the twinkling signals that told the engineer when to stop and go, thrilled me. To an adult, the trip must have seemed painfully slow, but I enjoyed every minute.

 

Aunt Winnie had packed a lunch for us to eat along the way as there was no dining car in the train. I was dying to know just what was in that big shopping bag she carried, but she, too, said, ‘Wait. You’ll see.’ Midway, Aunt Winnie pulled down her shopping bag from the luggage rack above our seats. My eyes widened as she opened it and began to take out its contents. I had expected lunch- meat sandwiches, but instead there was a container of fried chicken, two hardboiled eggs, bread and butter wrapped in waxed paper, crisp radishes and slim green onions from Winnie’s garden, as well as rosy sliced tomatoes. She had brought paper plates, paper cups and some of the ‘everyday’ silverware. A large bottle of cold tea was well wrapped in a dishtowel; the ice had melted, but it was still chilly. I cautiously balanced my plate on my knees and ate, wiping my lips and fingers with a large paper napkin. This was living!

 

When we had cleaned our plates, Aunt Winnie looked into the bag one more time. The best treat of all appeared — homemade chocolate cakes! Another cup of cold tea washed these down and then we carefully returned the remains of the food and silverware to the bag, which Aunt Winnie put into the corner by her feet.

 

‘Almost there,’ said my aunt, looking out of the window at the scenery passing by. And sure enough, as we pulled into the Pittsburgh station we immediately caught sight of aunt Alice, waiting for us, a smile like the sun lighting up her face, arms wide open. We got off the train and she led us past the taxi rank and the bus stop to her car that was parked near the station. And all the way to her home she was asking about my impressions of my first train trip and I could hardly find the words to express all the thrill and excitement that filled me.

19.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово «BUILD» так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Souvenirs From the Past

 

The lands of southern England have always been associated with mystery. Pre-historic sites like Stonehenge are souvenirs from the past ______by civilizations we still know very little about.

20.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово BRING так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

In 2009 an amazing discovery near a village called Damerham ______ to life a whole complex that archaeologists did not even know existed. At first scientists believed that they were crop circles.

21.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово CLOSELY так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

When they investigated the circles _______ , they found that the circles had been cut into the land.

22.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово IT так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

The circles existed 6,000 years ago, before Stonehenge ______ had been built.

23.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово MAKE так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Moab Mountain

 

Moab Mountain in Utah, the USA, is a breathtaking place to visit. Desert land and the canyons _______ of hard, red rock.

24.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово BECOME так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Moab is a popular venue for mountain biking, half marathons and Jeep Safari. In recent years, it _______ a unicycling playground too.

25.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово BE так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Around 150,000 riders come here throughout the year. If you _______ a cycling fan, Moab will provide you with a challenge.

26.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова DISCOVER од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

 

California

 

Nicknamed the “Golden State”, California is the third largest state in area after Alaska and Texas The ______ of gold

27.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова VALUE од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

and the immigration in 1849 of thousands of gold diggers in search of the ______ metal helped California’s admittance into the Union in 1850.

28.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова MARVEL од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Today, California, land of ______ redwoods, has the highest population of any state in the country.

29.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова AGRICULTURE од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

It is also America’s main ______ state which is especially known for its avocados and grapes.

30.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова BUSY од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

It is also the home of Hollywood, the center of America’s movie ______ .

31.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова HOME од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

However, not everyone wants to move to California. In recent years forest fires, floodings and earthquakes have left thousands of people ______ .

32.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) began

2) started

3) set

4) commenced


Rick Riordan – Author of Percy Jackson

How does an ordinary history teacher living in San Antonio, Texas, become one of the most well-known middle-grade writers of the 21st century?

Rick Riordan’s first book series “Percy Jackson and the Olympians” 32 ____________ out as a bedtime story for his son Haley, who had just been diagnosed with ADHD (attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder) and dyslexia. 33 _____ the time Haley was in the second grade and was studying Greek mythology. He asked his father to 34 ____________ him some myths as bedtime stories. When Rick ran out of myths, Haley insisted that he make 35 ________ some new ones. This is how the fictional character Percy Jackson was born, who, just as Haley did, suffered from ADHD and dyslexia. Later Rick told some of these stories to his 6th and 7th grade history class, who critiqued it, made some improvements and 36 ______________ him to write the story down.

At that time Rick Riordan was already an aspiring writer. He was trying and 37 _______________ to get some of his works published. On a whim, he sent his agent a manuscript with the title: “Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief”, which very quickly got published.

Rick Riordan got enough money from his first book to quit his teaching job and become a full-time writer. 38 _____________ then, he has written three more series based not only on Greek, but also on Roman, Egyptian, and Norse mythology. And he doesn’t seem to intend to stop writing any time soon!

33.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) At

2) Over

3) In

4) By


Rick Riordan – Author of Percy Jackson

How does an ordinary history teacher living in San Antonio, Texas, become one of the most well-known middle-grade writers of the 21st century?

Rick Riordan’s first book series “Percy Jackson and the Olympians” 32 ____________ out as a bedtime story for his son Haley, who had just been diagnosed with ADHD (attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder) and dyslexia. 33 _____ the time Haley was in the second grade and was studying Greek mythology. He asked his father to 34 ____________ him some myths as bedtime stories. When Rick ran out of myths, Haley insisted that he make 35 ________ some new ones. This is how the fictional character Percy Jackson was born, who, just as Haley did, suffered from ADHD and dyslexia. Later Rick told some of these stories to his 6th and 7th grade history class, who critiqued it, made some improvements and 36 ______________ him to write the story down.

At that time Rick Riordan was already an aspiring writer. He was trying and 37 _______________ to get some of his works published. On a whim, he sent his agent a manuscript with the title: “Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief”, which very quickly got published.

Rick Riordan got enough money from his first book to quit his teaching job and become a full-time writer. 38 _____________ then, he has written three more series based not only on Greek, but also on Roman, Egyptian, and Norse mythology. And he doesn’t seem to intend to stop writing any time soon!

34.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) speak

2) tell

3) talk

4) say


Rick Riordan – Author of Percy Jackson

How does an ordinary history teacher living in San Antonio, Texas, become one of the most well-known middle-grade writers of the 21st century?

Rick Riordan’s first book series “Percy Jackson and the Olympians” 32 ____________ out as a bedtime story for his son Haley, who had just been diagnosed with ADHD (attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder) and dyslexia. 33 _____ the time Haley was in the second grade and was studying Greek mythology. He asked his father to 34 ____________ him some myths as bedtime stories. When Rick ran out of myths, Haley insisted that he make 35 ________ some new ones. This is how the fictional character Percy Jackson was born, who, just as Haley did, suffered from ADHD and dyslexia. Later Rick told some of these stories to his 6th and 7th grade history class, who critiqued it, made some improvements and 36 ______________ him to write the story down.

At that time Rick Riordan was already an aspiring writer. He was trying and 37 _______________ to get some of his works published. On a whim, he sent his agent a manuscript with the title: “Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief”, which very quickly got published.

Rick Riordan got enough money from his first book to quit his teaching job and become a full-time writer. 38 _____________ then, he has written three more series based not only on Greek, but also on Roman, Egyptian, and Norse mythology. And he doesn’t seem to intend to stop writing any time soon!

35.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) out

2) over

3) off

4) up


Rick Riordan – Author of Percy Jackson

How does an ordinary history teacher living in San Antonio, Texas, become one of the most well-known middle-grade writers of the 21st century?

Rick Riordan’s first book series “Percy Jackson and the Olympians” 32 ____________ out as a bedtime story for his son Haley, who had just been diagnosed with ADHD (attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder) and dyslexia. 33 _____ the time Haley was in the second grade and was studying Greek mythology. He asked his father to 34 ____________ him some myths as bedtime stories. When Rick ran out of myths, Haley insisted that he make 35 ________ some new ones. This is how the fictional character Percy Jackson was born, who, just as Haley did, suffered from ADHD and dyslexia. Later Rick told some of these stories to his 6th and 7th grade history class, who critiqued it, made some improvements and 36 ______________ him to write the story down.

At that time Rick Riordan was already an aspiring writer. He was trying and 37 _______________ to get some of his works published. On a whim, he sent his agent a manuscript with the title: “Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief”, which very quickly got published.

Rick Riordan got enough money from his first book to quit his teaching job and become a full-time writer. 38 _____________ then, he has written three more series based not only on Greek, but also on Roman, Egyptian, and Norse mythology. And he doesn’t seem to intend to stop writing any time soon!

36.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) urged

2) made

3) insisted

4) suggested


Rick Riordan – Author of Percy Jackson

How does an ordinary history teacher living in San Antonio, Texas, become one of the most well-known middle-grade writers of the 21st century?

Rick Riordan’s first book series “Percy Jackson and the Olympians” 32 ____________ out as a bedtime story for his son Haley, who had just been diagnosed with ADHD (attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder) and dyslexia. 33 _____ the time Haley was in the second grade and was studying Greek mythology. He asked his father to 34 ____________ him some myths as bedtime stories. When Rick ran out of myths, Haley insisted that he make 35 ________ some new ones. This is how the fictional character Percy Jackson was born, who, just as Haley did, suffered from ADHD and dyslexia. Later Rick told some of these stories to his 6th and 7th grade history class, who critiqued it, made some improvements and 36 ______________ him to write the story down.

At that time Rick Riordan was already an aspiring writer. He was trying and 37 _______________ to get some of his works published. On a whim, he sent his agent a manuscript with the title: “Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief”, which very quickly got published.

Rick Riordan got enough money from his first book to quit his teaching job and become a full-time writer. 38 _____________ then, he has written three more series based not only on Greek, but also on Roman, Egyptian, and Norse mythology. And he doesn’t seem to intend to stop writing any time soon!

37.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) keeping

2) falling

3) failing

4) losing


Rick Riordan – Author of Percy Jackson

How does an ordinary history teacher living in San Antonio, Texas, become one of the most well-known middle-grade writers of the 21st century?

Rick Riordan’s first book series “Percy Jackson and the Olympians” 32 ____________ out as a bedtime story for his son Haley, who had just been diagnosed with ADHD (attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder) and dyslexia. 33 _____ the time Haley was in the second grade and was studying Greek mythology. He asked his father to 34 ____________ him some myths as bedtime stories. When Rick ran out of myths, Haley insisted that he make 35 ________ some new ones. This is how the fictional character Percy Jackson was born, who, just as Haley did, suffered from ADHD and dyslexia. Later Rick told some of these stories to his 6th and 7th grade history class, who critiqued it, made some improvements and 36 ______________ him to write the story down.

At that time Rick Riordan was already an aspiring writer. He was trying and 37 _______________ to get some of his works published. On a whim, he sent his agent a manuscript with the title: “Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief”, which very quickly got published.

Rick Riordan got enough money from his first book to quit his teaching job and become a full-time writer. 38 _____________ then, he has written three more series based not only on Greek, but also on Roman, Egyptian, and Norse mythology. And he doesn’t seem to intend to stop writing any time soon!

38.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) From

2) After

3) Since

4) Past


Rick Riordan – Author of Percy Jackson

How does an ordinary history teacher living in San Antonio, Texas, become one of the most well-known middle-grade writers of the 21st century?

Rick Riordan’s first book series “Percy Jackson and the Olympians” 32 ____________ out as a bedtime story for his son Haley, who had just been diagnosed with ADHD (attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder) and dyslexia. 33 _____ the time Haley was in the second grade and was studying Greek mythology. He asked his father to 34 ____________ him some myths as bedtime stories. When Rick ran out of myths, Haley insisted that he make 35 ________ some new ones. This is how the fictional character Percy Jackson was born, who, just as Haley did, suffered from ADHD and dyslexia. Later Rick told some of these stories to his 6th and 7th grade history class, who critiqued it, made some improvements and 36 ______________ him to write the story down.

At that time Rick Riordan was already an aspiring writer. He was trying and 37 _______________ to get some of his works published. On a whim, he sent his agent a manuscript with the title: “Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief”, which very quickly got published.

Rick Riordan got enough money from his first book to quit his teaching job and become a full-time writer. 38 _____________ then, he has written three more series based not only on Greek, but also on Roman, Egyptian, and Norse mythology. And he doesn’t seem to intend to stop writing any time soon!

39.

You have received a letter from your English-speaking pen-friend Joan who writes:

 

… When I forget to take an umbrella in summer, it always rains. What’s the weather like in summer where you live? What do you usually do when it rains? How do you protect yourself from bad weather?

I bought new shoes two days ago, but now I think I should take them back to the store ...

 

Write a letter to Joan.

In your letter

- answer her questions

- ask 3 questions about her new shoes

 

Write 100–140 words.

Remember the rules of letter writing.

40.

Вы­бе­ри­те толь­ко ОДНО из двух пред­ло­жен­ных вы­ска­зы­ва­ний и вы­ра­зи­те своё мне­ние по пред­ло­жен­ной про­бле­ме со­глас­но дан­но­му плану.

 

Comment on one of the following statements.

 

1. Friendship increases in visiting friends, but in visiting them seldom.

2. Modern TV series are better than blockbuster films.

 

What is your opinion? Do you agree with this statement? Write 200–250 words. Use the following plan:

− make an introduction (state the problem)

− express your personal opinion and give 2–3 reasons for your opinion

− express an opposing opinion and give 1–2 reasons for this opposing opinion

− explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion

− make a conclusion restating your position

41.

Imagine that you are preparing a project with your friend. You have found some interesting material for the presentation and you want to read this text to your friend. You have 1.5 minutes to read the text silently, then be ready to read it out aloud. You will not have more than 1.5 minutes to read it.

 

The highest mountain is located on Mars. The giant volcano Mount Olympus is the highest mountain in the solar system and in the known universe. At 14 miles and 388 miles across, it is almost three times the height of Mount Everest and so wide that its base would cover Arizona, or the whole of the area of the British Isles. The crater on the top is around 45 miles wide and over nearly 2 miles deep, easily big enough to swallow London.

We traditionally measure mountains by their height. If we measured them by their size, it would be meaningless to isolate one mountain in a range from the rest. That being so, Mount Everest would dwarf Olympus Mons. It is part of the gigantic range which is nearly 1,500 miles long.

42.

Study the advertisement.

 

 

You are considering visiting the coffee room and you'd like to get more information. In 1.5 minutes you are to ask five direct questions to find out the following:

1) price list

2) discounts

3) online booking

4) diversity of desserts

5) entertainment programs

You have 20 seconds to ask each question.

43.

These are photos from your photo album. Choose one photo to describe to your friend.

 

 

You will have to start speaking in 1.5 minutes and will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). In your talk remember to speak about:

 

• where and when the photo was taken

• what/who is in the photo

• what is happening

• why you keep the photo in your album

• why you decided to show the picture to your friend

 

You have to talk continuously, starting with: "I’ve chosen photo number … ".

44.

Study the two photographs. In 1.5 minutes be ready to compare and contrast the photographs:

 

• give a brief description of the photos (action, location)

• say what the pictures have in common

• say in what way the pictures are different

• say what extreme sport presented in the pictures you'd prefer

• explain why

 

You will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). You have to talk continuously.