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Вариант № 983636

1.

Вы услы­ши­те 6 вы­ска­зы­ва­ний. Уста­но­ви­те со­от­вет­ствие между вы­ска­зы­ва­ни­я­ми каж­до­го го­во­ря­ще­го A–F и утвер­жде­ни­я­ми, дан­ны­ми в спис­ке 1–7. Ис­поль­зуй­те каж­дое утвер­жде­ние, обо­зна­чен­ное со­от­вет­ству­ю­щей циф­рой, толь­ко один раз. В за­да­нии есть одно лиш­нее утвер­жде­ние. Вы услы­ши­те за­пись два­жды.

 

 

1. The speaker was glad when she/he was given more serious work to do.

2. The speaker learned nothing important at work.

3. The speaker did not want to take any responsibility.

4. The speaker didn’t mind doing a lot of things during work practice.

5. The speaker wants to do the same kind of work in the future.

6. The speaker has a different idea of the profession after completing the practice.

7. The speaker felt rather nervous before starting work.

 

 

 

 

Го­во­ря­щийABCDEF
Утвер­жде­ние

2.

Вы услы­ши­те диа­лог. Опре­де­ли­те, какие из при­ведённых утвер­жде­ний А–G со­от­вет­ству­ют со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста (1 – True), какие не со­от­вет­ству­ют (2 – False) и о чём в тек­сте не ска­за­но, то есть на ос­но­ва­нии тек­ста нель­зя дать ни по­ло­жи­тель­но­го, ни от­ри­ца­тель­но­го от­ве­та (3 – Not stated). За­не­си­те номер вы­бран­но­го Вами ва­ри­ан­та от­ве­та в таб­ли­цу. Вы услы­ши­те за­пись два­жды.

 

 

A) When leaving school Emily already knew that she would study medicine.

B) Emily left Melbourne to get new experiences.

C) Emily moved to Finland because she found her lab work in London boring.

D) In Finland people at university preferred to speak Finnish with Emily.

E) David is not happy about his experience of learning French in France.

F) David would like to go by the trans-Siberian train one day.

G) Emily is going to London again to continue her studies of immune system.

 

За­пи­ши­те в ответ цифры, рас­по­ло­жив их в по­ряд­ке, со­от­вет­ству­ю­щем бук­вам:

ABCDEFG
       

3.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The idea of becoming a photographer

 

1) came to Chris after seeing big sculptures.

2) was the result of his work with sculptures.

3) made him lose interest in sculptures.

4.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Chris assisted the photographer who

 

1) had the latest photographic equipment.

2) gave Chris valuable professional advice.

3) used to ask Chris challenging questions.

5.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

According to Chris, working as an assistant is a good way into a career because you can

 

1) get a better understanding of the profession.

2) learn the basic techniques of taking pictures.

3) make friends with a lot of talented people.

6.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The reason for buying a plastic camera was that it

 

1) allowed him to take original pictures.

2) was not very expensive.

3) was light to carry around.

7.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Chris uses the phrase ‘That got the ball rolling’ to say that

 

1) he became popular with the dancers.

2) he suddenly got very rich.

3) his art became more dance-oriented.

8.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Chris goes to the dance performances because

 

1) the choreographer recommends him to see the piece.

2) it is always interesting for him to be at the premiere.

3) he wants to find the links between them and his work.

9.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Chris thinks that dancers are great to work with because they

 

1) are lively and enthusiastic.

2) can cope with any problem.

3) can work long hours.

10.

Уста­но­ви­те со­от­вет­ствие между за­го­лов­ка­ми 1–8 и тек­ста­ми A–G. За­пи­ши­те свои от­ве­ты в таб­ли­цу. Ис­поль­зуй­те каж­дую цифру толь­ко один раз. В за­да­нии есть один лиш­ний за­го­ло­вок.

 

1. Places to stay in

2. Arts and culture

3. New country image

4. Going out

5. Different landscapes

6. Transport system

7. National languages

8. Eating out

 

 

A. Belgium has always had a lot more than the faceless administrative buildings that you can see in the outskirts of its capital, Brussels. A number of beautiful historic cities and Brussels itself offer impressive architecture, lively nightlife, first-rate restaurants and numerous other attractions for visitors. Today, the old-fashioned idea of ‘boring Belgium’ has been well and truly forgotten, as more and more people discover its very individual charms for themselves.

 

B. Nature in Belgium is varied. The rivers and hills of the Ardennes in the southeast contrast sharply with the rolling plains which make up much of the northern and western countryside. The most notable features are the great forest near the frontier with Germany and Luxembourg and the wide, sandy beaches of the northern coast.

 

C. It is easy both to enter and to travel around pocket- sized Belgium which is divided into the Dutchspeaking north and the French-speaking south. Officially the Belgians speak Dutch, French and German. Dutch is slightly more widely spoken than French, and German is spoken the least. The Belgians, living in the north, will often prefer to answer visitors in English rather than French, even if the visitor’s French is good.

 

D. Belgium has a wide range of hotels from 5-star luxury to small family pensions and inns. In some regions of the country, farm holidays are available. There visitors can (for a small cost) participate in the daily work of the farm. There are plenty of opportunities to rent furnished villas, flats, rooms, or bungalows for a holiday period. These holiday houses and flats are comfortable and well-equipped.

 

E. The Belgian style of cooking is similar to French, based on meat and seafood. Each region in Belgium has its own special dish. Butter, cream, beer and wine are generously used in cooking. The Belgians are keen on their food, and the country is very well supplied with excellent restaurants to suit all budgets. The perfect evening out here involves a delicious meal, and the restaurants and cafes are busy at all times of the week.

 

F. As well as being one of the best cities in the world for eating out (both for its high quality and range), Brussels has a very active and varied nightlife. It has 10 theatres which produce plays in both Dutch and French. There are also dozens of cinemas, numerous discos and many night-time cafes in Brussels. Elsewhere, the nightlife choices depend on the size of the town, but there is no shortage of fun to be had in any of the major cities.

 

G. There is a good system of underground trains, trams and buses in all the major towns and cities. In addition, Belgium’s waterways offer a pleasant way to enjoy the country. Visitors can take a one-hour cruise around the canals of Bruges (sometimes described as the Venice of the North) or an extended cruise along the rivers and canals linking the major cities of Belgium and the Netherlands.

 

 

 

ТекстABCDEFG
За­го­ло­вок

11.

Про­чи­тай­те текст и за­пол­ни­те про­пус­ки A–F ча­стя­ми пред­ло­же­ний, обо­зна­чен­ны­ми циф­ра­ми 1–7. Одна из ча­стей в спис­ке 1–7 — лиш­няя. За­не­си­те цифры, обо­зна­ча­ю­щие со­от­вет­ству­ю­щие части пред­ло­же­ний, в таб­ли­цу.

 

 

Laughing and evolution

 

The first hoots of laughter from an ancient ancestor of humans could be heard at least 10 million years ago, according to the results of a new study. Researchers used recordings of apes and babies being tickled A ______ to the last common ancestor that humans shared with the modern great apes, which include chimpanzees, gorillas and orangutans.

The finding challenges the opinion В ______ , suggesting instead that it emerged long before humans split from the evolutionary path that led to our primate cousins, between 10m and 16m years ago.

“In humans, laughing can be the strongest way of expressing how much we are enjoying ourselves, but it can also be used in other contexts, like making fun of someone,” said Marina Davila Ross, a psychologist at Portsmouth University. “I was interested in С ______ .”

Davila Ross travelled to seven zoos around Europe and visited a wildlife reserve in Sabah, Borneo, to record baby and juvenile apes D ______ . Great apes are known to make noises that are similar to laughter when they are excited and while they are playing with each other.

Davila Ross collected recordings of laughter from 21 chimps, gorillas, orangutans and bonobos and added recordings of three babies that were tickled to make them laugh.

To analyze the recordings, the team put them into a computer program. “Our evolutionary tree based on these acoustic recordings alone showed E ______ , but furthest from orangutans, with gorillas somewhere in the middle.” said Davila Ross. “What this shows is strong evidence to suggest F ______ .”

 

1. whether laughing emerged earlier on than humans did

2. to create the evolutionary tree linking humans and apes

3. that laughter is a uniquely human trait

4. that humans were closest to chimps and bonobos

5. that laughing comes from a common primate ancestor

6. while their caretakers tickled them

7. to trace the origin of laughter back

 

 

Про­пускABCDEF
Часть пред­ло­же­ния

12.

The narrator was afraid to enter the hairdresser’s because she

 

1) had spilt coffee on her white trousers.

2) doubted the qualification of local stylists.

3) was strangely self-conscious.

4) was pressed for time.


Avoidance activity

I am in Birmingham, sitting in a cafe opposite a hairdresser’s. I’m trying to find the courage to go in and book an appointment. I’ve been here three quarters of an hour and I am on my second large cappuccino. The table I’m sitting at has a wobble, so I’ve spilt some of the first cup and most of the second down the white trousers I was so proud of as I swanked in front of the mirror in my hotel room this morning.

 

I can see the hairdressers or stylists as they prefer to be called, as they work. There is a man with a ponytail who is perambulating around the salon, stopping now and then to frown and grab a bank of customer’s hair. There are two girl stylists: one has had her white blonde hair shaved and then allowed it explode into hundreds of hedgehog’s quills; the other has hair any self-respecting woman would scalp for: thick and lustrous. All three are dressed in severe black. Even undertakers allow themselves to wear a little white on the neck and cuffs, but undertakers don’t take their work half as seriously, and there lies the problem. I am afraid of hairdressers.

 

When I sit in front of the salon mirror stuttering and blushing, and saying that I don’t know what I want, I know I am the client from hell. Nobody is going to win Stylist of the year with me as a model.

 

‘Madam’s hair is very th ...’,they begin to say ‘thin’, think better of it and change it for ‘fine’ — ultimately, coming out with the hybrid word ‘thine’. I have been told my hair is ‘thine’ many times. Are they taught to use it at college? Along with other conversational openings, depending on the season: ‘Done your Christmas shopping?’ ‘Going away for Easter?’ ‘Booked your summer holiday?’ ‘You are brown, been way?’ ‘Nights are drawing in, aren’t they?’ ‘Going away for Christmas?’

 

I am hopeless at small talk (and big talk). I’m also averse to looking at my face in a mirror for an hour and a half. I behave as though I am a prisoner on the run.

 

I’ve looked at wigs in stores, but I am too shy to try them on, and I still remember the horror of watching a bewigged man jump into a swimming pool and then seeing what looked like a medium sized rodent break the surface and float on the water. He snatched at his wig, thrust it anyhow on top of his head and left the pool. I didn’t see him for the rest of the holiday.

 

There is a behavior trait that a lot of writers share — it is called avoidance activity. They will do anything to avoid starting to write: clean a drain, phone their mentally confused uncle in Peru, change the cat’s litter tray. I’m prone to this myself, in summer I deadhead flowers, even lobelia. In winter I’ll keep a fire going stick by stick, anything to put off the moment of scratching marks on virgin paper.

 

I am indulging an avoidance activity now. I’ve just ordered another cappuccino, I’ve given myself a sever talking: For God’s sake, woman! You are forty-seven years of age. Just cross the road, push the salon door open, and ask for an appointment!

It didn’t work. I’m now in my room, and I have just given myself a do-it-yourself hairdo, which consisted of a shampoo, condition and trim, with scissors on my Swiss army knife.

 

I can’t wait to get back to the Toni & Guy salon in Leicester. The staff there haven’t once called my hair ‘thine’ and they can do wonders with the savagery caused by Swiss army knife scissors.

13.

Watching the stylists, the narrator concluded that they

 

1) were too impulsive.

2) had hair anyone would envy.

3) had strange hair-does themselves.

4) attached too much importance to their ‘craft’.


Avoidance activity

I am in Birmingham, sitting in a cafe opposite a hairdresser’s. I’m trying to find the courage to go in and book an appointment. I’ve been here three quarters of an hour and I am on my second large cappuccino. The table I’m sitting at has a wobble, so I’ve spilt some of the first cup and most of the second down the white trousers I was so proud of as I swanked in front of the mirror in my hotel room this morning.

 

I can see the hairdressers or stylists as they prefer to be called, as they work. There is a man with a ponytail who is perambulating around the salon, stopping now and then to frown and grab a bank of customer’s hair. There are two girl stylists: one has had her white blonde hair shaved and then allowed it explode into hundreds of hedgehog’s quills; the other has hair any self-respecting woman would scalp for: thick and lustrous. All three are dressed in severe black. Even undertakers allow themselves to wear a little white on the neck and cuffs, but undertakers don’t take their work half as seriously, and there lies the problem. I am afraid of hairdressers.

 

When I sit in front of the salon mirror stuttering and blushing, and saying that I don’t know what I want, I know I am the client from hell. Nobody is going to win Stylist of the year with me as a model.

 

‘Madam’s hair is very th ...’,they begin to say ‘thin’, think better of it and change it for ‘fine’ — ultimately, coming out with the hybrid word ‘thine’. I have been told my hair is ‘thine’ many times. Are they taught to use it at college? Along with other conversational openings, depending on the season: ‘Done your Christmas shopping?’ ‘Going away for Easter?’ ‘Booked your summer holiday?’ ‘You are brown, been way?’ ‘Nights are drawing in, aren’t they?’ ‘Going away for Christmas?’

 

I am hopeless at small talk (and big talk). I’m also averse to looking at my face in a mirror for an hour and a half. I behave as though I am a prisoner on the run.

 

I’ve looked at wigs in stores, but I am too shy to try them on, and I still remember the horror of watching a bewigged man jump into a swimming pool and then seeing what looked like a medium sized rodent break the surface and float on the water. He snatched at his wig, thrust it anyhow on top of his head and left the pool. I didn’t see him for the rest of the holiday.

 

There is a behavior trait that a lot of writers share — it is called avoidance activity. They will do anything to avoid starting to write: clean a drain, phone their mentally confused uncle in Peru, change the cat’s litter tray. I’m prone to this myself, in summer I deadhead flowers, even lobelia. In winter I’ll keep a fire going stick by stick, anything to put off the moment of scratching marks on virgin paper.

 

I am indulging an avoidance activity now. I’ve just ordered another cappuccino, I’ve given myself a sever talking: For God’s sake, woman! You are forty-seven years of age. Just cross the road, push the salon door open, and ask for an appointment!

It didn’t work. I’m now in my room, and I have just given myself a do-it-yourself hairdo, which consisted of a shampoo, condition and trim, with scissors on my Swiss army knife.

 

I can’t wait to get back to the Toni & Guy salon in Leicester. The staff there haven’t once called my hair ‘thine’ and they can do wonders with the savagery caused by Swiss army knife scissors.

14.

The narrator calls herself ‘the client from hell’ mainly because she

 

1) doesn’t like to look at herself in the mirror.

2) never knows what she wants.

3) is too impatient to sit still.

4) is too demanding.


Avoidance activity

I am in Birmingham, sitting in a cafe opposite a hairdresser’s. I’m trying to find the courage to go in and book an appointment. I’ve been here three quarters of an hour and I am on my second large cappuccino. The table I’m sitting at has a wobble, so I’ve spilt some of the first cup and most of the second down the white trousers I was so proud of as I swanked in front of the mirror in my hotel room this morning.

 

I can see the hairdressers or stylists as they prefer to be called, as they work. There is a man with a ponytail who is perambulating around the salon, stopping now and then to frown and grab a bank of customer’s hair. There are two girl stylists: one has had her white blonde hair shaved and then allowed it explode into hundreds of hedgehog’s quills; the other has hair any self-respecting woman would scalp for: thick and lustrous. All three are dressed in severe black. Even undertakers allow themselves to wear a little white on the neck and cuffs, but undertakers don’t take their work half as seriously, and there lies the problem. I am afraid of hairdressers.

 

When I sit in front of the salon mirror stuttering and blushing, and saying that I don’t know what I want, I know I am the client from hell. Nobody is going to win Stylist of the year with me as a model.

 

‘Madam’s hair is very th ...’,they begin to say ‘thin’, think better of it and change it for ‘fine’ — ultimately, coming out with the hybrid word ‘thine’. I have been told my hair is ‘thine’ many times. Are they taught to use it at college? Along with other conversational openings, depending on the season: ‘Done your Christmas shopping?’ ‘Going away for Easter?’ ‘Booked your summer holiday?’ ‘You are brown, been way?’ ‘Nights are drawing in, aren’t they?’ ‘Going away for Christmas?’

 

I am hopeless at small talk (and big talk). I’m also averse to looking at my face in a mirror for an hour and a half. I behave as though I am a prisoner on the run.

 

I’ve looked at wigs in stores, but I am too shy to try them on, and I still remember the horror of watching a bewigged man jump into a swimming pool and then seeing what looked like a medium sized rodent break the surface and float on the water. He snatched at his wig, thrust it anyhow on top of his head and left the pool. I didn’t see him for the rest of the holiday.

 

There is a behavior trait that a lot of writers share — it is called avoidance activity. They will do anything to avoid starting to write: clean a drain, phone their mentally confused uncle in Peru, change the cat’s litter tray. I’m prone to this myself, in summer I deadhead flowers, even lobelia. In winter I’ll keep a fire going stick by stick, anything to put off the moment of scratching marks on virgin paper.

 

I am indulging an avoidance activity now. I’ve just ordered another cappuccino, I’ve given myself a sever talking: For God’s sake, woman! You are forty-seven years of age. Just cross the road, push the salon door open, and ask for an appointment!

It didn’t work. I’m now in my room, and I have just given myself a do-it-yourself hairdo, which consisted of a shampoo, condition and trim, with scissors on my Swiss army knife.

 

I can’t wait to get back to the Toni & Guy salon in Leicester. The staff there haven’t once called my hair ‘thine’ and they can do wonders with the savagery caused by Swiss army knife scissors.

15.

The narrator doesn’t like stylists as they

 

1) are too predictable in their conversation.

2) have once suggested that she should try a wig.

3) are too insensitive to clients wishes.

4) are too talkative.


Avoidance activity

I am in Birmingham, sitting in a cafe opposite a hairdresser’s. I’m trying to find the courage to go in and book an appointment. I’ve been here three quarters of an hour and I am on my second large cappuccino. The table I’m sitting at has a wobble, so I’ve spilt some of the first cup and most of the second down the white trousers I was so proud of as I swanked in front of the mirror in my hotel room this morning.

 

I can see the hairdressers or stylists as they prefer to be called, as they work. There is a man with a ponytail who is perambulating around the salon, stopping now and then to frown and grab a bank of customer’s hair. There are two girl stylists: one has had her white blonde hair shaved and then allowed it explode into hundreds of hedgehog’s quills; the other has hair any self-respecting woman would scalp for: thick and lustrous. All three are dressed in severe black. Even undertakers allow themselves to wear a little white on the neck and cuffs, but undertakers don’t take their work half as seriously, and there lies the problem. I am afraid of hairdressers.

 

When I sit in front of the salon mirror stuttering and blushing, and saying that I don’t know what I want, I know I am the client from hell. Nobody is going to win Stylist of the year with me as a model.

 

‘Madam’s hair is very th ...’,they begin to say ‘thin’, think better of it and change it for ‘fine’ — ultimately, coming out with the hybrid word ‘thine’. I have been told my hair is ‘thine’ many times. Are they taught to use it at college? Along with other conversational openings, depending on the season: ‘Done your Christmas shopping?’ ‘Going away for Easter?’ ‘Booked your summer holiday?’ ‘You are brown, been way?’ ‘Nights are drawing in, aren’t they?’ ‘Going away for Christmas?’

 

I am hopeless at small talk (and big talk). I’m also averse to looking at my face in a mirror for an hour and a half. I behave as though I am a prisoner on the run.

 

I’ve looked at wigs in stores, but I am too shy to try them on, and I still remember the horror of watching a bewigged man jump into a swimming pool and then seeing what looked like a medium sized rodent break the surface and float on the water. He snatched at his wig, thrust it anyhow on top of his head and left the pool. I didn’t see him for the rest of the holiday.

 

There is a behavior trait that a lot of writers share — it is called avoidance activity. They will do anything to avoid starting to write: clean a drain, phone their mentally confused uncle in Peru, change the cat’s litter tray. I’m prone to this myself, in summer I deadhead flowers, even lobelia. In winter I’ll keep a fire going stick by stick, anything to put off the moment of scratching marks on virgin paper.

 

I am indulging an avoidance activity now. I’ve just ordered another cappuccino, I’ve given myself a sever talking: For God’s sake, woman! You are forty-seven years of age. Just cross the road, push the salon door open, and ask for an appointment!

It didn’t work. I’m now in my room, and I have just given myself a do-it-yourself hairdo, which consisted of a shampoo, condition and trim, with scissors on my Swiss army knife.

 

I can’t wait to get back to the Toni & Guy salon in Leicester. The staff there haven’t once called my hair ‘thine’ and they can do wonders with the savagery caused by Swiss army knife scissors.

16.

According to the narrator the avoidance activity is

 

1) common to all writers.

2) mostly performed in winter.

3) talking to oneself.

4) a trick to postpone the beginning of work.


Avoidance activity

I am in Birmingham, sitting in a cafe opposite a hairdresser’s. I’m trying to find the courage to go in and book an appointment. I’ve been here three quarters of an hour and I am on my second large cappuccino. The table I’m sitting at has a wobble, so I’ve spilt some of the first cup and most of the second down the white trousers I was so proud of as I swanked in front of the mirror in my hotel room this morning.

 

I can see the hairdressers or stylists as they prefer to be called, as they work. There is a man with a ponytail who is perambulating around the salon, stopping now and then to frown and grab a bank of customer’s hair. There are two girl stylists: one has had her white blonde hair shaved and then allowed it explode into hundreds of hedgehog’s quills; the other has hair any self-respecting woman would scalp for: thick and lustrous. All three are dressed in severe black. Even undertakers allow themselves to wear a little white on the neck and cuffs, but undertakers don’t take their work half as seriously, and there lies the problem. I am afraid of hairdressers.

 

When I sit in front of the salon mirror stuttering and blushing, and saying that I don’t know what I want, I know I am the client from hell. Nobody is going to win Stylist of the year with me as a model.

 

‘Madam’s hair is very th ...’,they begin to say ‘thin’, think better of it and change it for ‘fine’ — ultimately, coming out with the hybrid word ‘thine’. I have been told my hair is ‘thine’ many times. Are they taught to use it at college? Along with other conversational openings, depending on the season: ‘Done your Christmas shopping?’ ‘Going away for Easter?’ ‘Booked your summer holiday?’ ‘You are brown, been way?’ ‘Nights are drawing in, aren’t they?’ ‘Going away for Christmas?’

 

I am hopeless at small talk (and big talk). I’m also averse to looking at my face in a mirror for an hour and a half. I behave as though I am a prisoner on the run.

 

I’ve looked at wigs in stores, but I am too shy to try them on, and I still remember the horror of watching a bewigged man jump into a swimming pool and then seeing what looked like a medium sized rodent break the surface and float on the water. He snatched at his wig, thrust it anyhow on top of his head and left the pool. I didn’t see him for the rest of the holiday.

 

There is a behavior trait that a lot of writers share — it is called avoidance activity. They will do anything to avoid starting to write: clean a drain, phone their mentally confused uncle in Peru, change the cat’s litter tray. I’m prone to this myself, in summer I deadhead flowers, even lobelia. In winter I’ll keep a fire going stick by stick, anything to put off the moment of scratching marks on virgin paper.

 

I am indulging an avoidance activity now. I’ve just ordered another cappuccino, I’ve given myself a sever talking: For God’s sake, woman! You are forty-seven years of age. Just cross the road, push the salon door open, and ask for an appointment!

It didn’t work. I’m now in my room, and I have just given myself a do-it-yourself hairdo, which consisted of a shampoo, condition and trim, with scissors on my Swiss army knife.

 

I can’t wait to get back to the Toni & Guy salon in Leicester. The staff there haven’t once called my hair ‘thine’ and they can do wonders with the savagery caused by Swiss army knife scissors.

17.

The narrator finally

 

1) talked herself into going and fixing an appointment.

2) got her hair done at a hotel.

3) cut her hair after shampooing it.

4) spoilt her hair completely.


Avoidance activity

I am in Birmingham, sitting in a cafe opposite a hairdresser’s. I’m trying to find the courage to go in and book an appointment. I’ve been here three quarters of an hour and I am on my second large cappuccino. The table I’m sitting at has a wobble, so I’ve spilt some of the first cup and most of the second down the white trousers I was so proud of as I swanked in front of the mirror in my hotel room this morning.

 

I can see the hairdressers or stylists as they prefer to be called, as they work. There is a man with a ponytail who is perambulating around the salon, stopping now and then to frown and grab a bank of customer’s hair. There are two girl stylists: one has had her white blonde hair shaved and then allowed it explode into hundreds of hedgehog’s quills; the other has hair any self-respecting woman would scalp for: thick and lustrous. All three are dressed in severe black. Even undertakers allow themselves to wear a little white on the neck and cuffs, but undertakers don’t take their work half as seriously, and there lies the problem. I am afraid of hairdressers.

 

When I sit in front of the salon mirror stuttering and blushing, and saying that I don’t know what I want, I know I am the client from hell. Nobody is going to win Stylist of the year with me as a model.

 

‘Madam’s hair is very th ...’,they begin to say ‘thin’, think better of it and change it for ‘fine’ — ultimately, coming out with the hybrid word ‘thine’. I have been told my hair is ‘thine’ many times. Are they taught to use it at college? Along with other conversational openings, depending on the season: ‘Done your Christmas shopping?’ ‘Going away for Easter?’ ‘Booked your summer holiday?’ ‘You are brown, been way?’ ‘Nights are drawing in, aren’t they?’ ‘Going away for Christmas?’

 

I am hopeless at small talk (and big talk). I’m also averse to looking at my face in a mirror for an hour and a half. I behave as though I am a prisoner on the run.

 

I’ve looked at wigs in stores, but I am too shy to try them on, and I still remember the horror of watching a bewigged man jump into a swimming pool and then seeing what looked like a medium sized rodent break the surface and float on the water. He snatched at his wig, thrust it anyhow on top of his head and left the pool. I didn’t see him for the rest of the holiday.

 

There is a behavior trait that a lot of writers share — it is called avoidance activity. They will do anything to avoid starting to write: clean a drain, phone their mentally confused uncle in Peru, change the cat’s litter tray. I’m prone to this myself, in summer I deadhead flowers, even lobelia. In winter I’ll keep a fire going stick by stick, anything to put off the moment of scratching marks on virgin paper.

 

I am indulging an avoidance activity now. I’ve just ordered another cappuccino, I’ve given myself a sever talking: For God’s sake, woman! You are forty-seven years of age. Just cross the road, push the salon door open, and ask for an appointment!

It didn’t work. I’m now in my room, and I have just given myself a do-it-yourself hairdo, which consisted of a shampoo, condition and trim, with scissors on my Swiss army knife.

 

I can’t wait to get back to the Toni & Guy salon in Leicester. The staff there haven’t once called my hair ‘thine’ and they can do wonders with the savagery caused by Swiss army knife scissors.

18.

The last paragraph means that the Toni & Guy salon in Leicester is the

 

1) only hairdresser’s she has ever risked going to.

2) salon she trusts and is not afraid to go to.

3) place where she is a special client.

4) the first place she has ever tried.


Avoidance activity

I am in Birmingham, sitting in a cafe opposite a hairdresser’s. I’m trying to find the courage to go in and book an appointment. I’ve been here three quarters of an hour and I am on my second large cappuccino. The table I’m sitting at has a wobble, so I’ve spilt some of the first cup and most of the second down the white trousers I was so proud of as I swanked in front of the mirror in my hotel room this morning.

 

I can see the hairdressers or stylists as they prefer to be called, as they work. There is a man with a ponytail who is perambulating around the salon, stopping now and then to frown and grab a bank of customer’s hair. There are two girl stylists: one has had her white blonde hair shaved and then allowed it explode into hundreds of hedgehog’s quills; the other has hair any self-respecting woman would scalp for: thick and lustrous. All three are dressed in severe black. Even undertakers allow themselves to wear a little white on the neck and cuffs, but undertakers don’t take their work half as seriously, and there lies the problem. I am afraid of hairdressers.

 

When I sit in front of the salon mirror stuttering and blushing, and saying that I don’t know what I want, I know I am the client from hell. Nobody is going to win Stylist of the year with me as a model.

 

‘Madam’s hair is very th ...’,they begin to say ‘thin’, think better of it and change it for ‘fine’ — ultimately, coming out with the hybrid word ‘thine’. I have been told my hair is ‘thine’ many times. Are they taught to use it at college? Along with other conversational openings, depending on the season: ‘Done your Christmas shopping?’ ‘Going away for Easter?’ ‘Booked your summer holiday?’ ‘You are brown, been way?’ ‘Nights are drawing in, aren’t they?’ ‘Going away for Christmas?’

 

I am hopeless at small talk (and big talk). I’m also averse to looking at my face in a mirror for an hour and a half. I behave as though I am a prisoner on the run.

 

I’ve looked at wigs in stores, but I am too shy to try them on, and I still remember the horror of watching a bewigged man jump into a swimming pool and then seeing what looked like a medium sized rodent break the surface and float on the water. He snatched at his wig, thrust it anyhow on top of his head and left the pool. I didn’t see him for the rest of the holiday.

 

There is a behavior trait that a lot of writers share — it is called avoidance activity. They will do anything to avoid starting to write: clean a drain, phone their mentally confused uncle in Peru, change the cat’s litter tray. I’m prone to this myself, in summer I deadhead flowers, even lobelia. In winter I’ll keep a fire going stick by stick, anything to put off the moment of scratching marks on virgin paper.

 

I am indulging an avoidance activity now. I’ve just ordered another cappuccino, I’ve given myself a sever talking: For God’s sake, woman! You are forty-seven years of age. Just cross the road, push the salon door open, and ask for an appointment!

It didn’t work. I’m now in my room, and I have just given myself a do-it-yourself hairdo, which consisted of a shampoo, condition and trim, with scissors on my Swiss army knife.

 

I can’t wait to get back to the Toni & Guy salon in Leicester. The staff there haven’t once called my hair ‘thine’ and they can do wonders with the savagery caused by Swiss army knife scissors.

19.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово «GO» так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

First Day of School

 

Melanie River had just turned ten years old, but she had never been to school.

Most children in the third grade _________ to school for two years. But Melanie was not most children.

20.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово BAD так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

She suffered from severe social anxiety. Attending a school with over 800 students was her ________ nightmare. But this year Melanie was determined that things were going to be different.

21.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово BE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

She and her family had just moved to a smaller town. There were only about 200 students at the local elementary school. Her mother hoped that Melanie _________ able to control her emotions and finally have a few friends.

22.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово ONE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

And so here Melanie was, on the way to school. And even though she felt as if her heart might explode out of chest, for the ___________ time in her life she was truly happy.

23.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово DRIVE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Panic

 

At some point of your life you’ve probably used the word panic. But have you ever wondered where it comes from?

Panic actually originates from a Greek myth. Pan, the Greek god of nature, had a strange power. When awakened from his sleep, he would cry out which __________the nearby animals into a state of terror.

24.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово THEY так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Pan would also use this power on his enemies, driving some of _____________ mad.

25.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово KNOW так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Among the Greeks this mental state ____________ as panic fear.

26.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова EXPENSIVE од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

 

Invention of Potato Chips

 

The potato chip was invented in 1853 by George Crum who was a chef at a restaurant in New York. Fried potatoes were popular at the restaurant because they were rather ______ , but one day a visitor complained that the slices were too thick.

27.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова NERVE од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Crum made thinner slices, but the ______ customer was still dissatisfied.

28.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова EXTREME од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Crum finally made fries that were too thin to eat with a fork, hoping to annoy the ______ difficult customer.

29.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова INVENT од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

But the customer was happy — and that was the ______ of potato chips!

30.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова INDUSTRY од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

______ manufacturing of potato chips began in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1895.

31.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова POPULAR од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

 

The chips gained even more ______ in 1926 when a wax paper potato chip bag was invented that helped to keep them fresh and crisp.

32.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) about

2) to

3) off

4) on


Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32–38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32 – 38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Укажите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа.

DANIEL’S VACATION

Daniel sailed out of Southampton on the Queen Mary that evening with his mother waving from the dockside. It was nice to have someone to see him 32 ______ , someone who cared about him. Daniel showed his passport to a ship’s officer at the gangplank and walked up into the ship. On deck, a steward looked at his ticket and directed him to his 33 ______. It was small but quite comfortable. He was excited as a child about his first trip abroad. While on board the great liner he wrote a long letter to his parents, which he posted five days later from Fifth Avenue. Early the following morning he purchased a ticket at a 34 ______ agency for a Pullman to Chicago. The train pulled out of Penn station at eight the same night, Daniel having spent a total of six hours in Manhattan where his only other purchase was a guide book of America. He couldn’t 35 ______ thinking about his parents. His parents didn’t know that he was going to Australia. They were sure he was going to spend his holidays in the USA.

Once the express had 36 ______the station, the Pullman carriage was attached to the super Chief which took him all the 37 ______ to San Francisco. Whenever the train pulled into a new station Daniel would leap off, buy a colourful postcard that indicated exactly where he was, fill in the white space with yet more information gained from the guide book before the train started to move. He would then post the filled-in card at the following stop and repeat the process. By the time the express had arrived 38 ______ Oakland station, San Francisco, Daniel had posted twenty-seven different cards back to his parents in the Little Boltons.

33.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) compartment

2) cabin

3) carriage

4) suit


Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32–38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32 – 38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Укажите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа.

DANIEL’S VACATION

Daniel sailed out of Southampton on the Queen Mary that evening with his mother waving from the dockside. It was nice to have someone to see him 32 ______ , someone who cared about him. Daniel showed his passport to a ship’s officer at the gangplank and walked up into the ship. On deck, a steward looked at his ticket and directed him to his 33 ______. It was small but quite comfortable. He was excited as a child about his first trip abroad. While on board the great liner he wrote a long letter to his parents, which he posted five days later from Fifth Avenue. Early the following morning he purchased a ticket at a 34 ______ agency for a Pullman to Chicago. The train pulled out of Penn station at eight the same night, Daniel having spent a total of six hours in Manhattan where his only other purchase was a guide book of America. He couldn’t 35 ______ thinking about his parents. His parents didn’t know that he was going to Australia. They were sure he was going to spend his holidays in the USA.

Once the express had 36 ______the station, the Pullman carriage was attached to the super Chief which took him all the 37 ______ to San Francisco. Whenever the train pulled into a new station Daniel would leap off, buy a colourful postcard that indicated exactly where he was, fill in the white space with yet more information gained from the guide book before the train started to move. He would then post the filled-in card at the following stop and repeat the process. By the time the express had arrived 38 ______ Oakland station, San Francisco, Daniel had posted twenty-seven different cards back to his parents in the Little Boltons.

34.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) travel

2) trip

3) journey

4) voyage


Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32–38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32 – 38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Укажите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа.

DANIEL’S VACATION

Daniel sailed out of Southampton on the Queen Mary that evening with his mother waving from the dockside. It was nice to have someone to see him 32 ______ , someone who cared about him. Daniel showed his passport to a ship’s officer at the gangplank and walked up into the ship. On deck, a steward looked at his ticket and directed him to his 33 ______. It was small but quite comfortable. He was excited as a child about his first trip abroad. While on board the great liner he wrote a long letter to his parents, which he posted five days later from Fifth Avenue. Early the following morning he purchased a ticket at a 34 ______ agency for a Pullman to Chicago. The train pulled out of Penn station at eight the same night, Daniel having spent a total of six hours in Manhattan where his only other purchase was a guide book of America. He couldn’t 35 ______ thinking about his parents. His parents didn’t know that he was going to Australia. They were sure he was going to spend his holidays in the USA.

Once the express had 36 ______the station, the Pullman carriage was attached to the super Chief which took him all the 37 ______ to San Francisco. Whenever the train pulled into a new station Daniel would leap off, buy a colourful postcard that indicated exactly where he was, fill in the white space with yet more information gained from the guide book before the train started to move. He would then post the filled-in card at the following stop and repeat the process. By the time the express had arrived 38 ______ Oakland station, San Francisco, Daniel had posted twenty-seven different cards back to his parents in the Little Boltons.

35.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) keep

2) help

3) stay

4) get


Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32–38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32 – 38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Укажите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа.

DANIEL’S VACATION

Daniel sailed out of Southampton on the Queen Mary that evening with his mother waving from the dockside. It was nice to have someone to see him 32 ______ , someone who cared about him. Daniel showed his passport to a ship’s officer at the gangplank and walked up into the ship. On deck, a steward looked at his ticket and directed him to his 33 ______. It was small but quite comfortable. He was excited as a child about his first trip abroad. While on board the great liner he wrote a long letter to his parents, which he posted five days later from Fifth Avenue. Early the following morning he purchased a ticket at a 34 ______ agency for a Pullman to Chicago. The train pulled out of Penn station at eight the same night, Daniel having spent a total of six hours in Manhattan where his only other purchase was a guide book of America. He couldn’t 35 ______ thinking about his parents. His parents didn’t know that he was going to Australia. They were sure he was going to spend his holidays in the USA.

Once the express had 36 ______the station, the Pullman carriage was attached to the super Chief which took him all the 37 ______ to San Francisco. Whenever the train pulled into a new station Daniel would leap off, buy a colourful postcard that indicated exactly where he was, fill in the white space with yet more information gained from the guide book before the train started to move. He would then post the filled-in card at the following stop and repeat the process. By the time the express had arrived 38 ______ Oakland station, San Francisco, Daniel had posted twenty-seven different cards back to his parents in the Little Boltons.

36.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) reached

2) went

3) arrived

4) came


Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32–38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32 – 38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Укажите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа.

DANIEL’S VACATION

Daniel sailed out of Southampton on the Queen Mary that evening with his mother waving from the dockside. It was nice to have someone to see him 32 ______ , someone who cared about him. Daniel showed his passport to a ship’s officer at the gangplank and walked up into the ship. On deck, a steward looked at his ticket and directed him to his 33 ______. It was small but quite comfortable. He was excited as a child about his first trip abroad. While on board the great liner he wrote a long letter to his parents, which he posted five days later from Fifth Avenue. Early the following morning he purchased a ticket at a 34 ______ agency for a Pullman to Chicago. The train pulled out of Penn station at eight the same night, Daniel having spent a total of six hours in Manhattan where his only other purchase was a guide book of America. He couldn’t 35 ______ thinking about his parents. His parents didn’t know that he was going to Australia. They were sure he was going to spend his holidays in the USA.

Once the express had 36 ______the station, the Pullman carriage was attached to the super Chief which took him all the 37 ______ to San Francisco. Whenever the train pulled into a new station Daniel would leap off, buy a colourful postcard that indicated exactly where he was, fill in the white space with yet more information gained from the guide book before the train started to move. He would then post the filled-in card at the following stop and repeat the process. By the time the express had arrived 38 ______ Oakland station, San Francisco, Daniel had posted twenty-seven different cards back to his parents in the Little Boltons.

37.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) path

2) road

3) way

4) line


Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32–38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32 – 38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Укажите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа.

DANIEL’S VACATION

Daniel sailed out of Southampton on the Queen Mary that evening with his mother waving from the dockside. It was nice to have someone to see him 32 ______ , someone who cared about him. Daniel showed his passport to a ship’s officer at the gangplank and walked up into the ship. On deck, a steward looked at his ticket and directed him to his 33 ______. It was small but quite comfortable. He was excited as a child about his first trip abroad. While on board the great liner he wrote a long letter to his parents, which he posted five days later from Fifth Avenue. Early the following morning he purchased a ticket at a 34 ______ agency for a Pullman to Chicago. The train pulled out of Penn station at eight the same night, Daniel having spent a total of six hours in Manhattan where his only other purchase was a guide book of America. He couldn’t 35 ______ thinking about his parents. His parents didn’t know that he was going to Australia. They were sure he was going to spend his holidays in the USA.

Once the express had 36 ______the station, the Pullman carriage was attached to the super Chief which took him all the 37 ______ to San Francisco. Whenever the train pulled into a new station Daniel would leap off, buy a colourful postcard that indicated exactly where he was, fill in the white space with yet more information gained from the guide book before the train started to move. He would then post the filled-in card at the following stop and repeat the process. By the time the express had arrived 38 ______ Oakland station, San Francisco, Daniel had posted twenty-seven different cards back to his parents in the Little Boltons.

38.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) in

2) for

3) to

4) at


Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32–38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32 – 38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Укажите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа.

DANIEL’S VACATION

Daniel sailed out of Southampton on the Queen Mary that evening with his mother waving from the dockside. It was nice to have someone to see him 32 ______ , someone who cared about him. Daniel showed his passport to a ship’s officer at the gangplank and walked up into the ship. On deck, a steward looked at his ticket and directed him to his 33 ______. It was small but quite comfortable. He was excited as a child about his first trip abroad. While on board the great liner he wrote a long letter to his parents, which he posted five days later from Fifth Avenue. Early the following morning he purchased a ticket at a 34 ______ agency for a Pullman to Chicago. The train pulled out of Penn station at eight the same night, Daniel having spent a total of six hours in Manhattan where his only other purchase was a guide book of America. He couldn’t 35 ______ thinking about his parents. His parents didn’t know that he was going to Australia. They were sure he was going to spend his holidays in the USA.

Once the express had 36 ______the station, the Pullman carriage was attached to the super Chief which took him all the 37 ______ to San Francisco. Whenever the train pulled into a new station Daniel would leap off, buy a colourful postcard that indicated exactly where he was, fill in the white space with yet more information gained from the guide book before the train started to move. He would then post the filled-in card at the following stop and repeat the process. By the time the express had arrived 38 ______ Oakland station, San Francisco, Daniel had posted twenty-seven different cards back to his parents in the Little Boltons.

39.

You have received a letter from your English-speaking pen friend Tom who writes:

 

...In Great Britain young people want to become independent from their parents as soon as possible. Could you tell me what you and your friends think about not relying on your parents? Are you ready to leave your family immediately after you finish school? Is it easy to rent a house or an apartment for students in Russia?

As for the latest news, I have just returned from a trip to Scotland ...

 

Write a letter to Tom. In your letter answer his questions, ask 3 questions about his trip to Scotland. Write 100−140 words. Remember the rules of letter writing.

40.

Вы­бе­ри­те толь­ко ОДНО из двух пред­ло­жен­ных вы­ска­зы­ва­ний и вы­ра­зи­те своё мне­ние по пред­ло­жен­ной про­бле­ме со­глас­но дан­но­му плану.

 

Comment on one of the following statements.

 

1. Some of my friends say there's nothing better than reading a good book while others would rather watch its film version.

2. A person who is fluent in a foreign language can easily work as an interpreter.

 

What is your opinion? Do you agree with this statement? Write 200–250 words. Use the following plan:

− make an introduction (state the problem)

− express your personal opinion and give 2–3 reasons for your opinion

− express an opposing opinion and give 1–2 reasons for this opposing opinion

− explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion

− make a conclusion restating your position

41.

Imagine that you are preparing a project with your friend. You have found some interesting material for the presentation and you want to read this text to your friend. You have 1.5 minutes to read the text silently, then be ready to read it out aloud. You will not have more than 1.5 minutes to read it.

 

How many nostrils do you have? Four. Two you can see, two you can’t. This discovery came from observing how fish breathe. Fish get their oxygen from water. Most of them have two pairs of nostrils, a forward-facing set for letting water in and a pair of «exhaust pipes» for letting it out again. The question is, if humans evolved from fishes, where did the other pair of nostrils go. The answer is that they migrated back inside the head to become internal. To do this they somehow had to work their way back through the teeth.

Similar gaps between the teeth can also be seen at an early stage of the human birth. When they fail to join up, the result is a cleft palate. So one ancient fish explains two ancient human mysteries. The most recent research on noses, incidentally, shows that we use each of our two external nostrils to detect different smells.

42.

Study the advertisement.

 

 

You are considering buying the tablet and you'd like to get more information. In 1.5 minutes you are to ask five direct questions to find out the following:

1) functions of the device

2) battery life

3) discount

4) things you get in the kit

5) online booking service

You have 20 seconds to ask each question.

43.

These are photos from your photo album. Choose one photo to describe to your friend.

 

 

You will have to start speaking in 1.5 minutes and will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). In your talk remember to speak about:

 

• where and when the photo was taken

• what/who is in the photo

• what is happening

• why you keep the photo in your album

• why you decided to show the picture to your friend

 

You have to talk continuously, starting with: "I’ve chosen photo number … ".

44.

Study the two photographs. In 1.5 minutes be ready to compare and contrast the photographs:

 

• give a brief description of the photos (action, location)

• say what the pictures have in common

• say in what way the pictures are different

• say in which audience presented in the pictures you would like to be

• explain why

 

You will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). You have to talk continuously.