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Вариант № 873914

1.

Вы услышите 6 высказываний. Установите соответствие между высказываниями каждого говорящего A–F и утверждениями, данными в списке 1–7. Используйте каждое утверждение, обозначенное соответствующей цифрой, только один раз. В задании есть одно лишнее утверждение. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

1. Clear instructions at work are very important.

2. Personal discussions in the office can distract from work.

3. It is important to think about gender differences in office work.

4. Employees’ health must be the top priority for office managers.

5. Positive atmosphere is important at work.

6. Effective communication is important for both employers and employees.

7. Team spirit is a key to success both for the office and its employees.

 

 

 

ГоворящийABCDEF
Утверждение

2.

Вы услышите диалог. Определите, какие из приведённых утверждений А–G соответствуют содержанию текста (1 – True), какие не соответствуют (2 – False) и о чём в тексте не сказано, то есть на основании текста нельзя дать ни положительного, ни отрицательного ответа (3 – Not stated). Занесите номер выбранного Вами варианта ответа в таблицу. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

A) Sally likes “Alice in Wonderland” more now, as she understands it better.

B) Sally’s father loved “Alice in Wonderland” when he was a kid.

C) The Mad Hatter’s character makes Sally think of her own personality.

D) “Alice in Wonderland” did not make a good impression upon Susan.

E) Sally is sure that not everything is openly expressed in the book.

F) Susan has seen all the film adaptations of “Alice in Wonderland”.

G) Sally respects Disney for not changing anything in the story.

 

Запишите в ответ цифры, расположив их в порядке, соответствующем буквам:

ABCDEFG
       

3.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Why did Helen change her original name?

 

1) She wanted to break her tribe traditions.

2) People found it difficult to pronounce it.

3) She did not like its meaning.

4.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Which tradition, according to Helen, is still alive in Navaho lifestyle?

 

1) Horse riding.

2) Clothes.

3) Houses.

5.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

How does Helen characterize her family?

 

1) They stick to the reservation area.

2) It tries to preserve old traditions.

3) It is unusually big for Navaho tribes.

6.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

What is Helen’s opinion about keeping Navaho traditions?

 

1) Navaho people must assimilate into white culture.

2) Traditional lifestyle is appropriate only in reservations.

3) There should be a balance in accepting white culture.

7.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

What does Helen say about her knowledge of the Navaho language?

 

1) She used to be better at it.

2) She still has an excellent command of it.

3) Her speaking skills are better than her writing.

8.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Which of the following weekend activities does Helen NOT mention as her habit?

 

1) Watching films.

2) Taking part in traditional ceremonies.

3) Meeting peers.

9.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

What does Helen dream of visiting?

 

1) Local places of interest.

2) American cities.

3) Countries on other continents.

10.

Установите соответствие между заголовками 1–8 и текстами A–G. Запишите свои ответы в таблицу. Используйте каждую цифру только один раз. В задании есть один лишний заголовок.

 

1. Plan beforehand

2. Carnival roots

3. The best viewpoints

4. Styles of dancing

5. A music group for a street

6. Carnival's music

7. The time for pleasure

8. The time to attend the Carnival

 

A. Carnival is the most famous holiday in Brazil and has become a world-famous annual celebration. It is celebrated in towns and villages throughout Brazil for almost a week 40 days before Easter, which is usually in February, the hottest month in the Southern Hemisphere. Officially, it starts on Saturday and finishes on Fat Tuesday with the beginning of Lent on Ash Wednesday, during which some Christians give up something that they enjoy.

 

B. The most colourful events take place in the Carnival World Capital, Rio de Janeiro. It was the original place where, in 1723, Portuguese immigrants went out onto the streets soaking each other with buckets of water and throwing mud and food, often ending up in street brawls and riots. The concept kept changing throughout the 1800s with more organized parades, where the Emperor with a group of aristocrats joined in masks with luxurious costumes and music.

 

C. Now the parade varies from state to state. It is a mixture of arts. The music played during Rio Carnival is samba — a unique Brazilian music originating from Rio. It's also a dance form that was invented by the poor Afro-Brazilians as a type of ritual music. The word «samba» meant to pray to the spirits of the ancestors and the gods of the African Pantheon. As a noun, it could mean a complaint or a cry.

 

D. Even today, the most involved groups in Rio Carnival are the poorest, the so-called «favelas», where houses are made of cardboard or other metal remains, and there is often no water, electricity or sewage system. However, the favelas' residents always join in the festivities and actually make the Carnival, which really means a lot to them. Because, for once during the year, they get to go out and have as much fun as they can.

 

E. Residents of the favelas are often members of local samba schools and are deeply involved with the performance and costumes of their groups. Each neighborhood in Rio has its favorite Carnival street band. There are more than 300 of them in Rio nowadays, and each year this number increases. Each band has its place or street for its parade and the big ones usually close the streets to the traffic.

 

F. Rio de Janeiro is usually divided into three zones. The so-called Zona Sul is by far the most pleasant place to stay in Rio, as it is by the sea and is the most civilized part of the city. Districts Copacabana and Ipanema together form a big stage offering a carnival happening at every corner. Leblon, being a bit more upscale, is also an excellent location.

 

G. Except the industries, malls and the carnival-related workers, the country stops completely for almost a week and festivities are intense, day and night. If you plan to go to watch the Carnival, you should organize your trip well in advance. The best hotels, especially in the Zona Sul, are booked up early, so it's a good idea to make a reservation at least 3 or 4 months in advance.

 

 

ТекстABCDEFG
Заголовок

11.

Про­чи­тай­те текст и за­пол­ни­те про­пус­ки A–F ча­стя­ми пред­ло­же­ний, обо­зна­чен­ны­ми циф­ра­ми 1–7. Одна из ча­стей в спис­ке 1–7 — лиш­няя. За­не­си­те цифры, обо­зна­ча­ю­щие со­от­вет­ству­ю­щие части пред­ло­же­ний, в таб­ли­цу.

 

 

Chocolate

 

Chocolate is made from a number of raw and processed foods produced from the seeds of tropical cacao trees. Cacao has been cultivated in A ______ at least 3000 years. For most of this time it was made into a drink called, in translation — “bitter water”. This is because В ______ to be fermented to develop a palatable flavour. After fermentation the beans are dried and roasted and the shell is removed to produce cacao nibs. These are then ground and liquefied into chocolate liquor. The liquor is then processed into cocoa solids or cocoa butter. Pure chocolate contains primarily cocoa solids and butter in different proportions. Much of С ______ with added sugar. Milk chocolate is sweetened chocolate that additionally contains either milk powder or condensed milk. White chocolate on the other D ______ is therefore not a true chocolate. Chocolate contains theobromine and phenethylamine which have physiological effects on the body. It is similar to serotonin levels in the brain. Scientists claim E ______ , can lower blood pressure. Recently, dark chocolate has also been promoted for its health benefits. But pet owners should remember that the presence of theobromine makes it toxic to cats and dogs. Chocolate is now one F ______ , although 16 of the top 20 chocolate consuming countries are in Europe. Also interesting is that 66% of world chocolate is consumed between meals.

 

1. the chocolate consumed today is made

2. that chocolate, eaten in moderation

3. central and southern America for

4. of the world’s most popular flavours

5. hand contains no cocoa solids and

6. cacao seeds are intensely bitter and have

7. many countries worldwide at

 

Про­пускABCDEF
Часть пред­ло­же­ния

12.

Dr. Gijbert Stoet claims that women do worse than men at maths because they ...

 

1) use improper methods in problem-solving.

2) are not encouraged to do the subject.

3) do not believe in their own competence.

4) employ wrong stereotypical techniques.


Women and the maths problem

 

Women's underachievement in maths may not be due to their poor self-image in the subject, a new report suggests. Researcher Dr. Gijsbert Stoet at the University of Leeds says that the so-called "stereotype threat" theory - which holds that women perform worse than men because they expect to do badly - "does not stand up to scrutiny".

 

Earlier research had serious flaws, he says, with improper use of statistical techniques and methodology. Clearly, those who carried out this research need to review their own competence in maths. Stoet believes the gender gap may simply be that men and women have different interests from an early age, and says the answer to getting more women into maths and engineering is probably a matter of motivation.

 

According to last year's results, even though girls perform as well as boys in their maths GCSEs, 60% of A-levels in the subject are taken by boys, who achieve 60% of grade As.

 

I am an engineer, who has worked in the chemical industry for most of my working career. When I graduated in the 80, I assumed we were at the start of a new era for women in science: I studied alongside intelligent and motivated women, opportunities seemed aplenty, in-roads had been made.

 

But 20 years down the line, only 8.7% of British engineers are women, the lowest proportion in Europe, compared with 25% in Sweden. So what has happened?

 

One of the main problems is that careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (known as Stem) are not sufficiently promoted in schools, with fewer children taking up these subjects at GCSE and A-level. Year in, year out, we are told that Britain has a skills shortage. The general lack of interest among schoolchildren in maths and science subjects, together with the underlying social conditioning that still remains - that science subjects "aren't really for girls" - has led to a double-whammy effect, reducing female entrants even further.

 

Over the past few years, I have been involved in Stemnet, an organization dedicated to promoting these careers by getting people who work in jobs from biologists to builders to talk to schoolchildren about what they do. It's an attempt to debunk the myth that maths and sciences are too difficult or too boring. I was amazed to see hundreds of schoolboys and girls at a recent event at the Science Museum, presenting a range of experiments and projects they had prepared. And the ones prepares by girls were equally challenging and sophisticated.

 

I agree with the new study that rather than focusing on the problems of stereotyping, we should devote more time to encouraging girls into science and technology: they clearly respond.

 

But encouraging schoolgirls into university and careers is not all. As is typical in most sectors, I see a number of female engineers at the entry and midlevels of companies, but precious few at the top. This is a huge waste of talent. It also raises the issue of certain professional inequality and a biased attitude towards women. The report has done well to challenge the myths behind women's underachievement in schools, but more work still needs to be done to address the problem of women's lack of achievement in the workplace. At least in the spheres closely related to science and engineering.

13.

Last year's A-levels maths results show that...

 

1) boys are more likely to fail.

2) more girls take the subject.

3) girls do better than boys.

4) boys get more A grades.


Women and the maths problem

 

Women's underachievement in maths may not be due to their poor self-image in the subject, a new report suggests. Researcher Dr. Gijsbert Stoet at the University of Leeds says that the so-called "stereotype threat" theory - which holds that women perform worse than men because they expect to do badly - "does not stand up to scrutiny".

 

Earlier research had serious flaws, he says, with improper use of statistical techniques and methodology. Clearly, those who carried out this research need to review their own competence in maths. Stoet believes the gender gap may simply be that men and women have different interests from an early age, and says the answer to getting more women into maths and engineering is probably a matter of motivation.

 

According to last year's results, even though girls perform as well as boys in their maths GCSEs, 60% of A-levels in the subject are taken by boys, who achieve 60% of grade As.

 

I am an engineer, who has worked in the chemical industry for most of my working career. When I graduated in the 80, I assumed we were at the start of a new era for women in science: I studied alongside intelligent and motivated women, opportunities seemed aplenty, in-roads had been made.

 

But 20 years down the line, only 8.7% of British engineers are women, the lowest proportion in Europe, compared with 25% in Sweden. So what has happened?

 

One of the main problems is that careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (known as Stem) are not sufficiently promoted in schools, with fewer children taking up these subjects at GCSE and A-level. Year in, year out, we are told that Britain has a skills shortage. The general lack of interest among schoolchildren in maths and science subjects, together with the underlying social conditioning that still remains - that science subjects "aren't really for girls" - has led to a double-whammy effect, reducing female entrants even further.

 

Over the past few years, I have been involved in Stemnet, an organization dedicated to promoting these careers by getting people who work in jobs from biologists to builders to talk to schoolchildren about what they do. It's an attempt to debunk the myth that maths and sciences are too difficult or too boring. I was amazed to see hundreds of schoolboys and girls at a recent event at the Science Museum, presenting a range of experiments and projects they had prepared. And the ones prepares by girls were equally challenging and sophisticated.

 

I agree with the new study that rather than focusing on the problems of stereotyping, we should devote more time to encouraging girls into science and technology: they clearly respond.

 

But encouraging schoolgirls into university and careers is not all. As is typical in most sectors, I see a number of female engineers at the entry and midlevels of companies, but precious few at the top. This is a huge waste of talent. It also raises the issue of certain professional inequality and a biased attitude towards women. The report has done well to challenge the myths behind women's underachievement in schools, but more work still needs to be done to address the problem of women's lack of achievement in the workplace. At least in the spheres closely related to science and engineering.

14.

Which of the following statements is NOT true, according to paragraphs 5 and 6?

 

1) Britain has fewer women engineers than other European countries.

2) The author has worked in engineering for over 20 years.

3) The prospects for women in science are best in Sweden.

4) The author's expectations about women in science have not come true.


Women and the maths problem

 

Women's underachievement in maths may not be due to their poor self-image in the subject, a new report suggests. Researcher Dr. Gijsbert Stoet at the University of Leeds says that the so-called "stereotype threat" theory - which holds that women perform worse than men because they expect to do badly - "does not stand up to scrutiny".

 

Earlier research had serious flaws, he says, with improper use of statistical techniques and methodology. Clearly, those who carried out this research need to review their own competence in maths. Stoet believes the gender gap may simply be that men and women have different interests from an early age, and says the answer to getting more women into maths and engineering is probably a matter of motivation.

 

According to last year's results, even though girls perform as well as boys in their maths GCSEs, 60% of A-levels in the subject are taken by boys, who achieve 60% of grade As.

 

I am an engineer, who has worked in the chemical industry for most of my working career. When I graduated in the 80, I assumed we were at the start of a new era for women in science: I studied alongside intelligent and motivated women, opportunities seemed aplenty, in-roads had been made.

 

But 20 years down the line, only 8.7% of British engineers are women, the lowest proportion in Europe, compared with 25% in Sweden. So what has happened?

 

One of the main problems is that careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (known as Stem) are not sufficiently promoted in schools, with fewer children taking up these subjects at GCSE and A-level. Year in, year out, we are told that Britain has a skills shortage. The general lack of interest among schoolchildren in maths and science subjects, together with the underlying social conditioning that still remains - that science subjects "aren't really for girls" - has led to a double-whammy effect, reducing female entrants even further.

 

Over the past few years, I have been involved in Stemnet, an organization dedicated to promoting these careers by getting people who work in jobs from biologists to builders to talk to schoolchildren about what they do. It's an attempt to debunk the myth that maths and sciences are too difficult or too boring. I was amazed to see hundreds of schoolboys and girls at a recent event at the Science Museum, presenting a range of experiments and projects they had prepared. And the ones prepares by girls were equally challenging and sophisticated.

 

I agree with the new study that rather than focusing on the problems of stereotyping, we should devote more time to encouraging girls into science and technology: they clearly respond.

 

But encouraging schoolgirls into university and careers is not all. As is typical in most sectors, I see a number of female engineers at the entry and midlevels of companies, but precious few at the top. This is a huge waste of talent. It also raises the issue of certain professional inequality and a biased attitude towards women. The report has done well to challenge the myths behind women's underachievement in schools, but more work still needs to be done to address the problem of women's lack of achievement in the workplace. At least in the spheres closely related to science and engineering.

15.

According to the author, social conditioning taking place in Britain implies that...

 

1) science could be interesting.

2) math is an optional skill.

3) boys are smarter than girls.

4) science is for boys.


Women and the maths problem

 

Women's underachievement in maths may not be due to their poor self-image in the subject, a new report suggests. Researcher Dr. Gijsbert Stoet at the University of Leeds says that the so-called "stereotype threat" theory - which holds that women perform worse than men because they expect to do badly - "does not stand up to scrutiny".

 

Earlier research had serious flaws, he says, with improper use of statistical techniques and methodology. Clearly, those who carried out this research need to review their own competence in maths. Stoet believes the gender gap may simply be that men and women have different interests from an early age, and says the answer to getting more women into maths and engineering is probably a matter of motivation.

 

According to last year's results, even though girls perform as well as boys in their maths GCSEs, 60% of A-levels in the subject are taken by boys, who achieve 60% of grade As.

 

I am an engineer, who has worked in the chemical industry for most of my working career. When I graduated in the 80, I assumed we were at the start of a new era for women in science: I studied alongside intelligent and motivated women, opportunities seemed aplenty, in-roads had been made.

 

But 20 years down the line, only 8.7% of British engineers are women, the lowest proportion in Europe, compared with 25% in Sweden. So what has happened?

 

One of the main problems is that careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (known as Stem) are not sufficiently promoted in schools, with fewer children taking up these subjects at GCSE and A-level. Year in, year out, we are told that Britain has a skills shortage. The general lack of interest among schoolchildren in maths and science subjects, together with the underlying social conditioning that still remains - that science subjects "aren't really for girls" - has led to a double-whammy effect, reducing female entrants even further.

 

Over the past few years, I have been involved in Stemnet, an organization dedicated to promoting these careers by getting people who work in jobs from biologists to builders to talk to schoolchildren about what they do. It's an attempt to debunk the myth that maths and sciences are too difficult or too boring. I was amazed to see hundreds of schoolboys and girls at a recent event at the Science Museum, presenting a range of experiments and projects they had prepared. And the ones prepares by girls were equally challenging and sophisticated.

 

I agree with the new study that rather than focusing on the problems of stereotyping, we should devote more time to encouraging girls into science and technology: they clearly respond.

 

But encouraging schoolgirls into university and careers is not all. As is typical in most sectors, I see a number of female engineers at the entry and midlevels of companies, but precious few at the top. This is a huge waste of talent. It also raises the issue of certain professional inequality and a biased attitude towards women. The report has done well to challenge the myths behind women's underachievement in schools, but more work still needs to be done to address the problem of women's lack of achievement in the workplace. At least in the spheres closely related to science and engineering.

16.

«They» in «to talk to schoolchildren about what they do» (paragraph 7) may refer to ...

 

1) schoolchildren.

2) careers.

3) experiments.

4) scientists.


Women and the maths problem

 

Women's underachievement in maths may not be due to their poor self-image in the subject, a new report suggests. Researcher Dr. Gijsbert Stoet at the University of Leeds says that the so-called "stereotype threat" theory - which holds that women perform worse than men because they expect to do badly - "does not stand up to scrutiny".

 

Earlier research had serious flaws, he says, with improper use of statistical techniques and methodology. Clearly, those who carried out this research need to review their own competence in maths. Stoet believes the gender gap may simply be that men and women have different interests from an early age, and says the answer to getting more women into maths and engineering is probably a matter of motivation.

 

According to last year's results, even though girls perform as well as boys in their maths GCSEs, 60% of A-levels in the subject are taken by boys, who achieve 60% of grade As.

 

I am an engineer, who has worked in the chemical industry for most of my working career. When I graduated in the 80, I assumed we were at the start of a new era for women in science: I studied alongside intelligent and motivated women, opportunities seemed aplenty, in-roads had been made.

 

But 20 years down the line, only 8.7% of British engineers are women, the lowest proportion in Europe, compared with 25% in Sweden. So what has happened?

 

One of the main problems is that careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (known as Stem) are not sufficiently promoted in schools, with fewer children taking up these subjects at GCSE and A-level. Year in, year out, we are told that Britain has a skills shortage. The general lack of interest among schoolchildren in maths and science subjects, together with the underlying social conditioning that still remains - that science subjects "aren't really for girls" - has led to a double-whammy effect, reducing female entrants even further.

 

Over the past few years, I have been involved in Stemnet, an organization dedicated to promoting these careers by getting people who work in jobs from biologists to builders to talk to schoolchildren about what they do. It's an attempt to debunk the myth that maths and sciences are too difficult or too boring. I was amazed to see hundreds of schoolboys and girls at a recent event at the Science Museum, presenting a range of experiments and projects they had prepared. And the ones prepares by girls were equally challenging and sophisticated.

 

I agree with the new study that rather than focusing on the problems of stereotyping, we should devote more time to encouraging girls into science and technology: they clearly respond.

 

But encouraging schoolgirls into university and careers is not all. As is typical in most sectors, I see a number of female engineers at the entry and midlevels of companies, but precious few at the top. This is a huge waste of talent. It also raises the issue of certain professional inequality and a biased attitude towards women. The report has done well to challenge the myths behind women's underachievement in schools, but more work still needs to be done to address the problem of women's lack of achievement in the workplace. At least in the spheres closely related to science and engineering.

17.

According to the final paragraphs, which of the factors discouraging girls from careers in science appears to be most important?

 

1) Academic underachievement.

2) Lack of opportunities in career growth.

3) Social stereotypes.

4) Lack of encouragement.


Women and the maths problem

 

Women's underachievement in maths may not be due to their poor self-image in the subject, a new report suggests. Researcher Dr. Gijsbert Stoet at the University of Leeds says that the so-called "stereotype threat" theory - which holds that women perform worse than men because they expect to do badly - "does not stand up to scrutiny".

 

Earlier research had serious flaws, he says, with improper use of statistical techniques and methodology. Clearly, those who carried out this research need to review their own competence in maths. Stoet believes the gender gap may simply be that men and women have different interests from an early age, and says the answer to getting more women into maths and engineering is probably a matter of motivation.

 

According to last year's results, even though girls perform as well as boys in their maths GCSEs, 60% of A-levels in the subject are taken by boys, who achieve 60% of grade As.

 

I am an engineer, who has worked in the chemical industry for most of my working career. When I graduated in the 80, I assumed we were at the start of a new era for women in science: I studied alongside intelligent and motivated women, opportunities seemed aplenty, in-roads had been made.

 

But 20 years down the line, only 8.7% of British engineers are women, the lowest proportion in Europe, compared with 25% in Sweden. So what has happened?

 

One of the main problems is that careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (known as Stem) are not sufficiently promoted in schools, with fewer children taking up these subjects at GCSE and A-level. Year in, year out, we are told that Britain has a skills shortage. The general lack of interest among schoolchildren in maths and science subjects, together with the underlying social conditioning that still remains - that science subjects "aren't really for girls" - has led to a double-whammy effect, reducing female entrants even further.

 

Over the past few years, I have been involved in Stemnet, an organization dedicated to promoting these careers by getting people who work in jobs from biologists to builders to talk to schoolchildren about what they do. It's an attempt to debunk the myth that maths and sciences are too difficult or too boring. I was amazed to see hundreds of schoolboys and girls at a recent event at the Science Museum, presenting a range of experiments and projects they had prepared. And the ones prepares by girls were equally challenging and sophisticated.

 

I agree with the new study that rather than focusing on the problems of stereotyping, we should devote more time to encouraging girls into science and technology: they clearly respond.

 

But encouraging schoolgirls into university and careers is not all. As is typical in most sectors, I see a number of female engineers at the entry and midlevels of companies, but precious few at the top. This is a huge waste of talent. It also raises the issue of certain professional inequality and a biased attitude towards women. The report has done well to challenge the myths behind women's underachievement in schools, but more work still needs to be done to address the problem of women's lack of achievement in the workplace. At least in the spheres closely related to science and engineering.

18.

The author's attitude to the problem may be called ...

 

1) interested.

2) impartial.

3) negative.

4) biased.


Women and the maths problem

 

Women's underachievement in maths may not be due to their poor self-image in the subject, a new report suggests. Researcher Dr. Gijsbert Stoet at the University of Leeds says that the so-called "stereotype threat" theory - which holds that women perform worse than men because they expect to do badly - "does not stand up to scrutiny".

 

Earlier research had serious flaws, he says, with improper use of statistical techniques and methodology. Clearly, those who carried out this research need to review their own competence in maths. Stoet believes the gender gap may simply be that men and women have different interests from an early age, and says the answer to getting more women into maths and engineering is probably a matter of motivation.

 

According to last year's results, even though girls perform as well as boys in their maths GCSEs, 60% of A-levels in the subject are taken by boys, who achieve 60% of grade As.

 

I am an engineer, who has worked in the chemical industry for most of my working career. When I graduated in the 80, I assumed we were at the start of a new era for women in science: I studied alongside intelligent and motivated women, opportunities seemed aplenty, in-roads had been made.

 

But 20 years down the line, only 8.7% of British engineers are women, the lowest proportion in Europe, compared with 25% in Sweden. So what has happened?

 

One of the main problems is that careers in science, technology, engineering and maths (known as Stem) are not sufficiently promoted in schools, with fewer children taking up these subjects at GCSE and A-level. Year in, year out, we are told that Britain has a skills shortage. The general lack of interest among schoolchildren in maths and science subjects, together with the underlying social conditioning that still remains - that science subjects "aren't really for girls" - has led to a double-whammy effect, reducing female entrants even further.

 

Over the past few years, I have been involved in Stemnet, an organization dedicated to promoting these careers by getting people who work in jobs from biologists to builders to talk to schoolchildren about what they do. It's an attempt to debunk the myth that maths and sciences are too difficult or too boring. I was amazed to see hundreds of schoolboys and girls at a recent event at the Science Museum, presenting a range of experiments and projects they had prepared. And the ones prepares by girls were equally challenging and sophisticated.

 

I agree with the new study that rather than focusing on the problems of stereotyping, we should devote more time to encouraging girls into science and technology: they clearly respond.

 

But encouraging schoolgirls into university and careers is not all. As is typical in most sectors, I see a number of female engineers at the entry and midlevels of companies, but precious few at the top. This is a huge waste of talent. It also raises the issue of certain professional inequality and a biased attitude towards women. The report has done well to challenge the myths behind women's underachievement in schools, but more work still needs to be done to address the problem of women's lack of achievement in the workplace. At least in the spheres closely related to science and engineering.

19.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово «WIN» так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

The Sydney Opera House

For many years there was no good opera house in Australia. In 1954, Jorn Utzon from Denmark __________________ a competition organized by the Australian government to build an opera house. The construction lasted for fourteen years until 1973.

20.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово BECOME так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Since then, the building __________________ the symbol of Australia.

21.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово WALK так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

The best way to visit the Sydney Opera House is to see a show. In sunny weather visitors can take a picnic basket and enjoy __________________ around the Botanic Gardens near the Opera House.

22.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово GIVE так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

My job in a restaurant

I was seventeen, when I __________________ a job in a local fast food restaurant.

23.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово ONE так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Training was for three days. During the __________________ two days I watched videos about my job. During the last day of orientation, I had to be at the restaurant to see how things got done.

24.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово BUSY так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

I began work on Saturday, which was the __________________ day of the week.

25.

Пре­об­ра­зуй­те, если это не­об­хо­ди­мо, слово NOT CONNECT так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

My present job __________________ with cooking. I work for a computer company. I like it, but I miss communicating with people.

26.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова EXPENSE од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

 

The King’s New Dress

 

Many years ago, there was a King who spent all his time and money on dressing up. He loved riding round in his ______ garments so that everybody could see him.

27.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова DIFFER од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

His wardrobes contained clothes of ______ patterns and designs.

28.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова HONEST од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

One day two ______ men appeared at the palace and said they could make beautiful clothes which had magical properties.

29.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова VISIBLE од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

Only clever people would be able to see them — but they would be ______ to anyone who was stupid or not good at their job. The King thought this was an excellent opportunity to find out who was wise and who was foolish in his kingdom.

30.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова WONDER од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

The two men were given gold and silver thread and two ______ weaving machines and they started to work.

31.

Об­ра­зуй­те от слова CERTAIN од­но­ко­рен­ное слово так, чтобы оно грам­ма­ти­че­ски и лек­си­че­ски со­от­вет­ство­ва­ло со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста.

 

After several weeks the King decided to send an old and honest minister, who was ______ clever and good at his job, to visit the two men. Can you guess what he saw?

32.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) view

2) sight

3) look

4) glimpse


Daniel and Diana

 

Daniel and Diana were good friends. They had majored in economics at Bristol University in the early 1980s. Then Daniel met Rachel, who had arrived a year after them, and fell in love with her at first 32 ______. In Rachel he found everything he was looking 33 ______ in a wife. They married the day he graduated, and after they returned from their honeymoon, David took over the management of his father's farm in Bedfordshire. Three children followed in quick succession, and Diana was proud when she was asked to be godmother to Sophie, the eldest. Daniel and Rachel had been married for twelve years; they 34 ______ ever quarelled. 35 ______ married couples were so happy.

 

36 ______ Diane was regularly asked to spend the weekend with them in the country, she only accepted one invitation out of three. She would have liked to join them more often, but since her divorce she had no desire to take advantage of their hospitality.

 

Diane felt tired. She 37 ______ her work, but it had been an awful week. Two contracts had fallen through, her son had been dropped from the school soccer team, and her daughter had never stopped 38 ______ her that her father didn't mind her watching television when she ought to be doing her homework. "I will survive." Diana smiled and thought about Daniel's birthday. She had forgotten to get him a present.

33.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) at

2) after

3) into

4) for


Daniel and Diana

 

Daniel and Diana were good friends. They had majored in economics at Bristol University in the early 1980s. Then Daniel met Rachel, who had arrived a year after them, and fell in love with her at first 32 ______. In Rachel he found everything he was looking 33 ______ in a wife. They married the day he graduated, and after they returned from their honeymoon, David took over the management of his father's farm in Bedfordshire. Three children followed in quick succession, and Diana was proud when she was asked to be godmother to Sophie, the eldest. Daniel and Rachel had been married for twelve years; they 34 ______ ever quarelled. 35 ______ married couples were so happy.

 

36 ______ Diane was regularly asked to spend the weekend with them in the country, she only accepted one invitation out of three. She would have liked to join them more often, but since her divorce she had no desire to take advantage of their hospitality.

 

Diane felt tired. She 37 ______ her work, but it had been an awful week. Two contracts had fallen through, her son had been dropped from the school soccer team, and her daughter had never stopped 38 ______ her that her father didn't mind her watching television when she ought to be doing her homework. "I will survive." Diana smiled and thought about Daniel's birthday. She had forgotten to get him a present.

34.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) nearly

2) closely

3) merely

4) hardly


Daniel and Diana

 

Daniel and Diana were good friends. They had majored in economics at Bristol University in the early 1980s. Then Daniel met Rachel, who had arrived a year after them, and fell in love with her at first 32 ______. In Rachel he found everything he was looking 33 ______ in a wife. They married the day he graduated, and after they returned from their honeymoon, David took over the management of his father's farm in Bedfordshire. Three children followed in quick succession, and Diana was proud when she was asked to be godmother to Sophie, the eldest. Daniel and Rachel had been married for twelve years; they 34 ______ ever quarelled. 35 ______ married couples were so happy.

 

36 ______ Diane was regularly asked to spend the weekend with them in the country, she only accepted one invitation out of three. She would have liked to join them more often, but since her divorce she had no desire to take advantage of their hospitality.

 

Diane felt tired. She 37 ______ her work, but it had been an awful week. Two contracts had fallen through, her son had been dropped from the school soccer team, and her daughter had never stopped 38 ______ her that her father didn't mind her watching television when she ought to be doing her homework. "I will survive." Diana smiled and thought about Daniel's birthday. She had forgotten to get him a present.

35.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) Few

2) Little

3) Much

4) Many


Daniel and Diana

 

Daniel and Diana were good friends. They had majored in economics at Bristol University in the early 1980s. Then Daniel met Rachel, who had arrived a year after them, and fell in love with her at first 32 ______. In Rachel he found everything he was looking 33 ______ in a wife. They married the day he graduated, and after they returned from their honeymoon, David took over the management of his father's farm in Bedfordshire. Three children followed in quick succession, and Diana was proud when she was asked to be godmother to Sophie, the eldest. Daniel and Rachel had been married for twelve years; they 34 ______ ever quarelled. 35 ______ married couples were so happy.

 

36 ______ Diane was regularly asked to spend the weekend with them in the country, she only accepted one invitation out of three. She would have liked to join them more often, but since her divorce she had no desire to take advantage of their hospitality.

 

Diane felt tired. She 37 ______ her work, but it had been an awful week. Two contracts had fallen through, her son had been dropped from the school soccer team, and her daughter had never stopped 38 ______ her that her father didn't mind her watching television when she ought to be doing her homework. "I will survive." Diana smiled and thought about Daniel's birthday. She had forgotten to get him a present.

36.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) Nevertheless

2) Although

3) However

4) Therefore


Daniel and Diana

 

Daniel and Diana were good friends. They had majored in economics at Bristol University in the early 1980s. Then Daniel met Rachel, who had arrived a year after them, and fell in love with her at first 32 ______. In Rachel he found everything he was looking 33 ______ in a wife. They married the day he graduated, and after they returned from their honeymoon, David took over the management of his father's farm in Bedfordshire. Three children followed in quick succession, and Diana was proud when she was asked to be godmother to Sophie, the eldest. Daniel and Rachel had been married for twelve years; they 34 ______ ever quarelled. 35 ______ married couples were so happy.

 

36 ______ Diane was regularly asked to spend the weekend with them in the country, she only accepted one invitation out of three. She would have liked to join them more often, but since her divorce she had no desire to take advantage of their hospitality.

 

Diane felt tired. She 37 ______ her work, but it had been an awful week. Two contracts had fallen through, her son had been dropped from the school soccer team, and her daughter had never stopped 38 ______ her that her father didn't mind her watching television when she ought to be doing her homework. "I will survive." Diana smiled and thought about Daniel's birthday. She had forgotten to get him a present.

37.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) admired

2) pleased

3) enjoyed

4) approved


Daniel and Diana

 

Daniel and Diana were good friends. They had majored in economics at Bristol University in the early 1980s. Then Daniel met Rachel, who had arrived a year after them, and fell in love with her at first 32 ______. In Rachel he found everything he was looking 33 ______ in a wife. They married the day he graduated, and after they returned from their honeymoon, David took over the management of his father's farm in Bedfordshire. Three children followed in quick succession, and Diana was proud when she was asked to be godmother to Sophie, the eldest. Daniel and Rachel had been married for twelve years; they 34 ______ ever quarelled. 35 ______ married couples were so happy.

 

36 ______ Diane was regularly asked to spend the weekend with them in the country, she only accepted one invitation out of three. She would have liked to join them more often, but since her divorce she had no desire to take advantage of their hospitality.

 

Diane felt tired. She 37 ______ her work, but it had been an awful week. Two contracts had fallen through, her son had been dropped from the school soccer team, and her daughter had never stopped 38 ______ her that her father didn't mind her watching television when she ought to be doing her homework. "I will survive." Diana smiled and thought about Daniel's birthday. She had forgotten to get him a present.

38.

Вставь­те про­пу­щен­ное слово:

 

1) telling

2) saying

3) speaking

4) talking


Daniel and Diana

 

Daniel and Diana were good friends. They had majored in economics at Bristol University in the early 1980s. Then Daniel met Rachel, who had arrived a year after them, and fell in love with her at first 32 ______. In Rachel he found everything he was looking 33 ______ in a wife. They married the day he graduated, and after they returned from their honeymoon, David took over the management of his father's farm in Bedfordshire. Three children followed in quick succession, and Diana was proud when she was asked to be godmother to Sophie, the eldest. Daniel and Rachel had been married for twelve years; they 34 ______ ever quarelled. 35 ______ married couples were so happy.

 

36 ______ Diane was regularly asked to spend the weekend with them in the country, she only accepted one invitation out of three. She would have liked to join them more often, but since her divorce she had no desire to take advantage of their hospitality.

 

Diane felt tired. She 37 ______ her work, but it had been an awful week. Two contracts had fallen through, her son had been dropped from the school soccer team, and her daughter had never stopped 38 ______ her that her father didn't mind her watching television when she ought to be doing her homework. "I will survive." Diana smiled and thought about Daniel's birthday. She had forgotten to get him a present.

39.

You have received a letter from your English-speaking pen-friend Nicole who writes:

 

...When I think about leaving school it is clear I'm going to miss my school friends, classes and teachers very much. They’re so important to me. We seem to be very friendly and enthusiastic about participating in all the school events. What does school mean to you? Do you feel the same about it? Do you think you will miss school? Are you going to meet your school friends after you finish school?

I have lived in London most of my life but I'd really love to travel to other countries...

 

Write a letter to Nicole. In your letter answer her questions, ask 3 questions about her plans for travelling. Write 100—140 words. Remember the rules of letter writing. You have 20 minutes to do this task.

40.

Выберите только ОДНО из двух предложенных высказываний и выразите своё мнение по предложенной проблеме согласно данному плану.

 

Comment on one of the following statements.

 

1. Some people think that young people should follow in their parents' footsteps when choosing a profession.

2. Teenagers should be allowed to read whatever books they like.

 

What is your opinion? Do you agree with this statement? Write 200–250 words. Use the following plan:

− make an introduction (state the problem)

− express your personal opinion and give 2–3 reasons for your opinion

− express an opposing opinion and give 1–2 reasons for this opposing opinion

− explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion

− make a conclusion restating your position

41.

Imagine that you are preparing a project with your friend. You have found some interesting material for the presentation and you want to read this text to your friend. You have 1.5 minutes to read the text silently, then be ready to read it out aloud. You will not have more than 1.5 minutes to read it.

 

... You don’t see many birds in winter. Most have left your area. Those that stay are not as active. Activity uses energy that is needed to keep warm. The worst problems for birds in winter are getting enough heat and holding on to the heat once it is made. These are problems for all birds. But it is especially true for very small ones. They cannot find enough food. The weather stays so cold for so long that they cannot eat enough to keep alive. But birds have many ways of fighting the cold.

You shiver to keep warm. The heat that you make is made mostly in your muscles. The muscles make more heat when they are active. So one way of keeping warm is to move about, use your muscles. Another way is to shiver. When your body needs heat, the muscles tighten and loosen quickly. They become active. Just as you shiver to keep warm, so do birds.

42.

Study the advertisement.

 

 

You are considering visiting Natural history museum and you'd like to get more information. In 1.5 minutes you are to ask five direct questions to find out the following:

1) working hours

2) number of available exhibitions

3) services they provide

4) if they have a free internet

5) if you can buy tickets online

You have 20 seconds to ask each question.

43.

These are photos from your photo album. Choose one photo to describe to your friend.

 

 

You will have to start speaking in 1.5 minutes and will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). In your talk remember to speak about:

 

• where and when the photo was taken

• what/who is in the photo

• what is happening

• why you keep the photo in your album

• why you decided to show the picture to your friend

 

You have to talk continuously, starting with: "I’ve chosen photo number … ".

44.

Look at the two pictures. In 1 min 30, you will have to compare:

 

• give a brief description of the photos (action, location)

• say what the pictures have in common

• say in what way the pictures are different

• say what lifestyle presented in the prhotos you prefer

• explain why

 

You should speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). You have to talk continuously.