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Вариант № 873909

1.

Вы услышите 6 высказываний. Установите соответствие между высказываниями каждого говорящего A–F и утверждениями, данными в списке 1–7. Используйте каждое утверждение, обозначенное соответствующей цифрой, только один раз. В задании есть одно лишнее утверждение. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

1. The speaker has some time to herself / himself at work.

2. The speaker hasn’t given up the job because she / he likes dealing with customers.

3. There is a growing need for the speaker’s services.

4. Although the job is boring the speaker does it because it is wellpaid.

5. The speaker enjoys her / his job although she / he doesn’t make good money.

6. The speaker agrees to do any job because she / he needs money badly.

7. The speaker likes the environment and the fact that she / he doesn’t have to work too quickly.

 

ГоворящийABCDEF
Утверждение

2.

Вы услы­ши­те диа­лог. Опре­де­ли­те, какие из при­ведённых утвер­жде­ний А–G со­от­вет­ству­ют со­дер­жа­нию тек­ста (1 – True), какие не со­от­вет­ству­ют (2 – False) и о чём в тек­сте не ска­за­но, то есть на ос­но­ва­нии тек­ста нель­зя дать ни по­ло­жи­тель­но­го, ни от­ри­ца­тель­но­го от­ве­та (3 – Not stated). За­не­си­те номер вы­бран­но­го Вами ва­ри­ан­та от­ве­та в таб­ли­цу. Вы услы­ши­те за­пись два­жды.

 

 

A) Ruth speaks English with a strong accent.

B) Moving to Spain made Ruth split up with her boyfriend.

C) Ruth loves Irish dance very much.

D) Ruth thinks that people behave differently in big cities in Ireland.

E) Bray is an industrial town.

F) The area around Bray is mountainous.

G) Ruth might visit her home town in the autumn.

 

За­пи­ши­те в ответ цифры, рас­по­ло­жив их в по­ряд­ке, со­от­вет­ству­ю­щем бук­вам:

ABCDEFG
       

3.

Вы услы­ши­те ре­пор­таж два­жды. Вы­бе­ри­те пра­виль­ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The narrator was brought up mainly in

 

1) Denmark.

2) England.

3) the USA.

4.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The narrator is not happy about Danish grocery stores because of

 

1) the quality of the products.

2) their size.

3) the poor choice of foods.

5.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The narrator criticizes

 

1) the lifestyle in Denmark.

2) Danish supermarkets.

3) the Danish diet.

6.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The prices in the Danish stores are quite high because

 

1) the level of service is very high.

2) everything is imported from abroad.

3) there are no artificial foods.

7.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

According to the unwritten rules of Danish supermarket culture

 

1) you pack all the food you buy on your own, without any help.

2) shop assistants are always ready to pack your food for you.

3) there are clerks whose duty is to help you with your bagging.

8.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

When the narrator says, “I do miss American convenience” it means that he

 

1) wants ready-made dinners to be delivered to his place.

2) wants to rent a flat near a big supermarket.

3) doesn’t like to spend much time cooking his meals.

9.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Having lived in Denmark for a few years as a student, the narrator

 

1) feels nostalgic about the USA.

2) believes it to be a good place for him.

3) pities Danish people.

10.

Установите соответствие между текстами A–G и заголовками 1–8. Запишите свои ответы в таблицу. Используйте каждую цифру только один раз. В задании один заголовок лишний.

 

1. Look to your past

2. Health benefits of hobbies

3. Finding a hobby that suits you

4. Dangerous hobby

5. Time out with a purpose

6. Finding time for your hobby

7. Making new friends

8. Finding excitement

 

A. Hobbies provide work-free and responsibility-free time in your schedule. This can be especially useful for people who feel stressed by all that they have to do and need to recharge their batteries. For some of us it may be difficult to give ourselves permission to just sit and relax. Having a hobby, however, can provide a break and help people feel that they’re not just ‘sitting around’ but are using their free time for something productive.

B. Are there things you enjoyed as a child that you might still enjoy as an adult? Maybe you had a fantastic record collection, loved to make clothes for your dolls or were always out on your bike. Those are all things you could pick up again as an adult that would make great hobbies. Or there may be hobbies in your home right now that you started but have recently forgotten about. Maybe it’s time to finish that crochet project or pick up the guitar again.

C. If you’re adding a new thing into your life, you have to take time and focus away from something else. The good news is that most of us have a lot of time we’re not using well, either because we’re spending a lot of time online or watching TV or just wasting time we could be spending on our hobbies. See if you can spend a half hour or so every other day to explore your interest. This way it would be best in case you find that hobby isn’t for you after all.

D. Of course, everyone is different and your personality does play a role in what sorts of hobbies you’ll like. If you don’t have a lot of patience you might feel that knitting is too much for you, but exploring quick sewing projects might be a better choice. Maybe you really like being with friends, so you need to take a class or have an interest that you can do with a group. If you travel a lot, something portable or that you can do anywhere is helpful.

E. One study found that those who engage in physical leisure activities for at least 20 minutes once a week are less likely to have a fatigue. Other research found that enjoyable activities performed during leisure time were associated with lower blood pressure, total cortisol, and body mass index, and feelings of better physical function. Such activities were also associated with higher levels of positive psychosocial states and lower levels of depression.

F. When you look for material or equipment for your hobby, you are likely to find people who have the same hobby as you. You may be surprised to know how serious some people are about their hobbies and therefore would have great knowledge of their chosen pastime. Instead of meeting people from your work or college or those whom you have grown apart with, it is a great way to meet people with whom you have something in common.

G. For those who aren’t very stressed and may actually be understimulated, hobbies provide a nice source of eustress, the healthy kind of stress that we all need to remain feeling happy about life. If the rest of your life is somewhat dull or uninspiring, hobbies can provide meaning and fun, and can break up a boring schedule, without feeling like work. In other words, hobbies can provide just the right amount of challenge.

 

ТекстABCDEFG
Заголовок

11.

Прочитайте текст и заполните пропуски A–F частями предложений, обозначенными цифрами 1–7. Одна из частей в списке 1–7 — лишняя. Занесите цифры, обозначающие соответствующие части предложений, в таблицу.

 

 

My Stage

 

My family moved to Rockaway, New Jersey in the summer of 1978. It was there that my dreams of stardom began.

I was nine years old. Heather Lambrix lived next door, and she and I became best friends. I thought she was so lucky A ______ . She took tap and jazz and got to wear cool costumes with bright sequences and makeup and perform on stage. I went to all of her recitals and В ______ .

My living room and sometimes the garage were my stage. I belonged to a cast of four, which consisted of Heather, my two younger sisters, Lisa and Faith, and I. Since I was the oldest and the bossiest, I was the director. Heather came with her own costumes С ______ . We choreographed most of our dance numbers as we went along. Poor Faith ... we would throw her around D ______ . She was only about four or five ... and so agile. We danced around in our bathing suits to audiocassettes and records from all the Broadway musicals. We’d put a small piece of plywood on the living room carpet, E ______ . And I would imitate her in my sneakers on the linoleum in the hall. I was a dancer in the making.

My dad eventually converted a part of our basement into a small theater. He hung two “spotlights” and a sheet for a curtain. We performed dance numbers to tunes like “One” and “The Music and the Mirror” from A Chorus Line. I sang all the songs from Annie. I loved to sing, F ___________. I just loved to sing. So I belted out songs like “Tomorrow”, “Maybe” and “What I Did For Love.” I knew then, this is what I wanted to do with my life.

 

1. like she was a rag doll

2. whether I was good at it or not

3. wished I, too, could be on stage

4. and I designed the rest

5. and I was star struck

6. so Heather could do her tap routine

7. because she got to go to dance lessons

 

ПропускABCDEF
Часть предложения

12.

What kind of a phone does the author want her children to have first?

 

1) An old-type phone.

2) A modern phone.

3) Something like her “old” phone.

4) Something like her parents’ phone.


The lure of the screen

I used to tell my parents that the first cell phone I will allow my own children to have will be a flip phone, incapable of Internet access and certainly without the ability to use “apps.” I argued that their first phones would have only the capabilities of my first phone – texting and calling – used primarily to contact their parents, and once in a while classmates to ask about homework. Isn’t it primarily what we think kids need phones for?

It took me a while to realize how impractical this was because if the first piece of a given technology that I possessed had been the same as my parents’, I would have been walking around with a cassette player in a world of iPods (incidentally, I loved my Sony Walkman CD player).

So maybe it was a little ridiculous for me to suggest this, but I think my point was (and is) valid. I look at young kids today and see that they’re as attached to mobile devices as their adult counterparts. It has come to the point where kids would rather sit inside and play games on their parents’ (or their own) iPads than go outside and play hide-and-seek, or catch, well, do anything.

And while I recall my parents telling me to drop the Legos or even the PlayStation controller and head outside, I, unlike these children, often actually did it, and when I didn’t, at least I was capable of breaking away to utter a response.

Today, however, youngsters are becoming so attached to technology at such a young age, as young as 3 or 4, that they are forgetting – if they ever learned in the first place – how to have fun without an iPad – literally.

In April, The Telegraph quoted North Ireland teacher Colin Kinney, who said his colleagues, “have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialize with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Kinney goes on to say that the “brilliant computer skills” these children possess is “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks.”

It is true that we are moving into a world in which the ability to understand the language of computer coding is more important than the ability to read and write cursive. This, however, is not an excuse for the extent to which young children have become as addicted (or more so) to their mobile devices as their parents.

LeapFrog, the popular children’s brand is set to unveil a product called the Leap Band; the first wearable tech catered specifically toward children. And although the wristwatch-like product is designed to get kids up and moving, it raises a question for me: How young is too young?

I read that Google is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 (though giving their parents control over how the service is used).

Because of this cross-generational addiction, this week has been designated as “Screen Free Week” in schools around the country. The week is aimed at getting every member of the family away from computer and device use for just one week and head outside.

For parents, technology is now a dilemma: Give it to their kids at a young age so they are in line with their classmates in terms of computer prowess or withhold it and allow them the gift of social skills … only time will tell, but I fear the former is gaining ground.

13.

Which of the following statements reflects the author’s views?

 

1) Parents shouldn’t allow their children to play games on iPads.

2) Children are more attached to technology than adults.

3) It’s hard to imagine the modern life without mobile devices.

4) Children now prefer their gadgets to outdoor games.


The lure of the screen

I used to tell my parents that the first cell phone I will allow my own children to have will be a flip phone, incapable of Internet access and certainly without the ability to use “apps.” I argued that their first phones would have only the capabilities of my first phone – texting and calling – used primarily to contact their parents, and once in a while classmates to ask about homework. Isn’t it primarily what we think kids need phones for?

It took me a while to realize how impractical this was because if the first piece of a given technology that I possessed had been the same as my parents’, I would have been walking around with a cassette player in a world of iPods (incidentally, I loved my Sony Walkman CD player).

So maybe it was a little ridiculous for me to suggest this, but I think my point was (and is) valid. I look at young kids today and see that they’re as attached to mobile devices as their adult counterparts. It has come to the point where kids would rather sit inside and play games on their parents’ (or their own) iPads than go outside and play hide-and-seek, or catch, well, do anything.

And while I recall my parents telling me to drop the Legos or even the PlayStation controller and head outside, I, unlike these children, often actually did it, and when I didn’t, at least I was capable of breaking away to utter a response.

Today, however, youngsters are becoming so attached to technology at such a young age, as young as 3 or 4, that they are forgetting – if they ever learned in the first place – how to have fun without an iPad – literally.

In April, The Telegraph quoted North Ireland teacher Colin Kinney, who said his colleagues, “have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialize with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Kinney goes on to say that the “brilliant computer skills” these children possess is “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks.”

It is true that we are moving into a world in which the ability to understand the language of computer coding is more important than the ability to read and write cursive. This, however, is not an excuse for the extent to which young children have become as addicted (or more so) to their mobile devices as their parents.

LeapFrog, the popular children’s brand is set to unveil a product called the Leap Band; the first wearable tech catered specifically toward children. And although the wristwatch-like product is designed to get kids up and moving, it raises a question for me: How young is too young?

I read that Google is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 (though giving their parents control over how the service is used).

Because of this cross-generational addiction, this week has been designated as “Screen Free Week” in schools around the country. The week is aimed at getting every member of the family away from computer and device use for just one week and head outside.

For parents, technology is now a dilemma: Give it to their kids at a young age so they are in line with their classmates in terms of computer prowess or withhold it and allow them the gift of social skills … only time will tell, but I fear the former is gaining ground.

14.

What does the author remember about her childhood?

 

1) She preferred to ignore her parents when she played.

2) She went for a walk outside whenever her parents told her.

3) She didn’t like to play outside.

4) She enjoyed PlayStation more than Lego.


The lure of the screen

I used to tell my parents that the first cell phone I will allow my own children to have will be a flip phone, incapable of Internet access and certainly without the ability to use “apps.” I argued that their first phones would have only the capabilities of my first phone – texting and calling – used primarily to contact their parents, and once in a while classmates to ask about homework. Isn’t it primarily what we think kids need phones for?

It took me a while to realize how impractical this was because if the first piece of a given technology that I possessed had been the same as my parents’, I would have been walking around with a cassette player in a world of iPods (incidentally, I loved my Sony Walkman CD player).

So maybe it was a little ridiculous for me to suggest this, but I think my point was (and is) valid. I look at young kids today and see that they’re as attached to mobile devices as their adult counterparts. It has come to the point where kids would rather sit inside and play games on their parents’ (or their own) iPads than go outside and play hide-and-seek, or catch, well, do anything.

And while I recall my parents telling me to drop the Legos or even the PlayStation controller and head outside, I, unlike these children, often actually did it, and when I didn’t, at least I was capable of breaking away to utter a response.

Today, however, youngsters are becoming so attached to technology at such a young age, as young as 3 or 4, that they are forgetting – if they ever learned in the first place – how to have fun without an iPad – literally.

In April, The Telegraph quoted North Ireland teacher Colin Kinney, who said his colleagues, “have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialize with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Kinney goes on to say that the “brilliant computer skills” these children possess is “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks.”

It is true that we are moving into a world in which the ability to understand the language of computer coding is more important than the ability to read and write cursive. This, however, is not an excuse for the extent to which young children have become as addicted (or more so) to their mobile devices as their parents.

LeapFrog, the popular children’s brand is set to unveil a product called the Leap Band; the first wearable tech catered specifically toward children. And although the wristwatch-like product is designed to get kids up and moving, it raises a question for me: How young is too young?

I read that Google is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 (though giving their parents control over how the service is used).

Because of this cross-generational addiction, this week has been designated as “Screen Free Week” in schools around the country. The week is aimed at getting every member of the family away from computer and device use for just one week and head outside.

For parents, technology is now a dilemma: Give it to their kids at a young age so they are in line with their classmates in terms of computer prowess or withhold it and allow them the gift of social skills … only time will tell, but I fear the former is gaining ground.

15.

Teacher Kinney is worried about children’s …

 

1) writing skills.

2) communicative skills.

3) computer skills.

4) parents’ attitudes.


The lure of the screen

I used to tell my parents that the first cell phone I will allow my own children to have will be a flip phone, incapable of Internet access and certainly without the ability to use “apps.” I argued that their first phones would have only the capabilities of my first phone – texting and calling – used primarily to contact their parents, and once in a while classmates to ask about homework. Isn’t it primarily what we think kids need phones for?

It took me a while to realize how impractical this was because if the first piece of a given technology that I possessed had been the same as my parents’, I would have been walking around with a cassette player in a world of iPods (incidentally, I loved my Sony Walkman CD player).

So maybe it was a little ridiculous for me to suggest this, but I think my point was (and is) valid. I look at young kids today and see that they’re as attached to mobile devices as their adult counterparts. It has come to the point where kids would rather sit inside and play games on their parents’ (or their own) iPads than go outside and play hide-and-seek, or catch, well, do anything.

And while I recall my parents telling me to drop the Legos or even the PlayStation controller and head outside, I, unlike these children, often actually did it, and when I didn’t, at least I was capable of breaking away to utter a response.

Today, however, youngsters are becoming so attached to technology at such a young age, as young as 3 or 4, that they are forgetting – if they ever learned in the first place – how to have fun without an iPad – literally.

In April, The Telegraph quoted North Ireland teacher Colin Kinney, who said his colleagues, “have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialize with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Kinney goes on to say that the “brilliant computer skills” these children possess is “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks.”

It is true that we are moving into a world in which the ability to understand the language of computer coding is more important than the ability to read and write cursive. This, however, is not an excuse for the extent to which young children have become as addicted (or more so) to their mobile devices as their parents.

LeapFrog, the popular children’s brand is set to unveil a product called the Leap Band; the first wearable tech catered specifically toward children. And although the wristwatch-like product is designed to get kids up and moving, it raises a question for me: How young is too young?

I read that Google is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 (though giving their parents control over how the service is used).

Because of this cross-generational addiction, this week has been designated as “Screen Free Week” in schools around the country. The week is aimed at getting every member of the family away from computer and device use for just one week and head outside.

For parents, technology is now a dilemma: Give it to their kids at a young age so they are in line with their classmates in terms of computer prowess or withhold it and allow them the gift of social skills … only time will tell, but I fear the former is gaining ground.

16.

“This” in paragraph 8 (This, however, is not an excuse …) refers to …

 

1) importance of computers.

2) literacy skills.

3) computer language.

4) addiction to technology.


The lure of the screen

I used to tell my parents that the first cell phone I will allow my own children to have will be a flip phone, incapable of Internet access and certainly without the ability to use “apps.” I argued that their first phones would have only the capabilities of my first phone – texting and calling – used primarily to contact their parents, and once in a while classmates to ask about homework. Isn’t it primarily what we think kids need phones for?

It took me a while to realize how impractical this was because if the first piece of a given technology that I possessed had been the same as my parents’, I would have been walking around with a cassette player in a world of iPods (incidentally, I loved my Sony Walkman CD player).

So maybe it was a little ridiculous for me to suggest this, but I think my point was (and is) valid. I look at young kids today and see that they’re as attached to mobile devices as their adult counterparts. It has come to the point where kids would rather sit inside and play games on their parents’ (or their own) iPads than go outside and play hide-and-seek, or catch, well, do anything.

And while I recall my parents telling me to drop the Legos or even the PlayStation controller and head outside, I, unlike these children, often actually did it, and when I didn’t, at least I was capable of breaking away to utter a response.

Today, however, youngsters are becoming so attached to technology at such a young age, as young as 3 or 4, that they are forgetting – if they ever learned in the first place – how to have fun without an iPad – literally.

In April, The Telegraph quoted North Ireland teacher Colin Kinney, who said his colleagues, “have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialize with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Kinney goes on to say that the “brilliant computer skills” these children possess is “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks.”

It is true that we are moving into a world in which the ability to understand the language of computer coding is more important than the ability to read and write cursive. This, however, is not an excuse for the extent to which young children have become as addicted (or more so) to their mobile devices as their parents.

LeapFrog, the popular children’s brand is set to unveil a product called the Leap Band; the first wearable tech catered specifically toward children. And although the wristwatch-like product is designed to get kids up and moving, it raises a question for me: How young is too young?

I read that Google is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 (though giving their parents control over how the service is used).

Because of this cross-generational addiction, this week has been designated as “Screen Free Week” in schools around the country. The week is aimed at getting every member of the family away from computer and device use for just one week and head outside.

For parents, technology is now a dilemma: Give it to their kids at a young age so they are in line with their classmates in terms of computer prowess or withhold it and allow them the gift of social skills … only time will tell, but I fear the former is gaining ground.

17.

What does the author imply by asking “How young is too young”?

 

1) Leap Band products suit any child.

2) Wristwatch-like products are for older children.

3) Technology may enter children’s life too early.

4) Leap Band is inappropriate for young children.


The lure of the screen

I used to tell my parents that the first cell phone I will allow my own children to have will be a flip phone, incapable of Internet access and certainly without the ability to use “apps.” I argued that their first phones would have only the capabilities of my first phone – texting and calling – used primarily to contact their parents, and once in a while classmates to ask about homework. Isn’t it primarily what we think kids need phones for?

It took me a while to realize how impractical this was because if the first piece of a given technology that I possessed had been the same as my parents’, I would have been walking around with a cassette player in a world of iPods (incidentally, I loved my Sony Walkman CD player).

So maybe it was a little ridiculous for me to suggest this, but I think my point was (and is) valid. I look at young kids today and see that they’re as attached to mobile devices as their adult counterparts. It has come to the point where kids would rather sit inside and play games on their parents’ (or their own) iPads than go outside and play hide-and-seek, or catch, well, do anything.

And while I recall my parents telling me to drop the Legos or even the PlayStation controller and head outside, I, unlike these children, often actually did it, and when I didn’t, at least I was capable of breaking away to utter a response.

Today, however, youngsters are becoming so attached to technology at such a young age, as young as 3 or 4, that they are forgetting – if they ever learned in the first place – how to have fun without an iPad – literally.

In April, The Telegraph quoted North Ireland teacher Colin Kinney, who said his colleagues, “have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialize with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Kinney goes on to say that the “brilliant computer skills” these children possess is “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks.”

It is true that we are moving into a world in which the ability to understand the language of computer coding is more important than the ability to read and write cursive. This, however, is not an excuse for the extent to which young children have become as addicted (or more so) to their mobile devices as their parents.

LeapFrog, the popular children’s brand is set to unveil a product called the Leap Band; the first wearable tech catered specifically toward children. And although the wristwatch-like product is designed to get kids up and moving, it raises a question for me: How young is too young?

I read that Google is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 (though giving their parents control over how the service is used).

Because of this cross-generational addiction, this week has been designated as “Screen Free Week” in schools around the country. The week is aimed at getting every member of the family away from computer and device use for just one week and head outside.

For parents, technology is now a dilemma: Give it to their kids at a young age so they are in line with their classmates in terms of computer prowess or withhold it and allow them the gift of social skills … only time will tell, but I fear the former is gaining ground.

18.

How, according to the author, will the parents solve the technological dilemma?

 

1) In favour of the computer skills.

2) In favour of both the computer and communication skills.

3) They will try to refrain from making the decision.

4) In favour of communication skills.


The lure of the screen

I used to tell my parents that the first cell phone I will allow my own children to have will be a flip phone, incapable of Internet access and certainly without the ability to use “apps.” I argued that their first phones would have only the capabilities of my first phone – texting and calling – used primarily to contact their parents, and once in a while classmates to ask about homework. Isn’t it primarily what we think kids need phones for?

It took me a while to realize how impractical this was because if the first piece of a given technology that I possessed had been the same as my parents’, I would have been walking around with a cassette player in a world of iPods (incidentally, I loved my Sony Walkman CD player).

So maybe it was a little ridiculous for me to suggest this, but I think my point was (and is) valid. I look at young kids today and see that they’re as attached to mobile devices as their adult counterparts. It has come to the point where kids would rather sit inside and play games on their parents’ (or their own) iPads than go outside and play hide-and-seek, or catch, well, do anything.

And while I recall my parents telling me to drop the Legos or even the PlayStation controller and head outside, I, unlike these children, often actually did it, and when I didn’t, at least I was capable of breaking away to utter a response.

Today, however, youngsters are becoming so attached to technology at such a young age, as young as 3 or 4, that they are forgetting – if they ever learned in the first place – how to have fun without an iPad – literally.

In April, The Telegraph quoted North Ireland teacher Colin Kinney, who said his colleagues, “have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialize with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Kinney goes on to say that the “brilliant computer skills” these children possess is “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks.”

It is true that we are moving into a world in which the ability to understand the language of computer coding is more important than the ability to read and write cursive. This, however, is not an excuse for the extent to which young children have become as addicted (or more so) to their mobile devices as their parents.

LeapFrog, the popular children’s brand is set to unveil a product called the Leap Band; the first wearable tech catered specifically toward children. And although the wristwatch-like product is designed to get kids up and moving, it raises a question for me: How young is too young?

I read that Google is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 (though giving their parents control over how the service is used).

Because of this cross-generational addiction, this week has been designated as “Screen Free Week” in schools around the country. The week is aimed at getting every member of the family away from computer and device use for just one week and head outside.

For parents, technology is now a dilemma: Give it to their kids at a young age so they are in line with their classmates in terms of computer prowess or withhold it and allow them the gift of social skills … only time will tell, but I fear the former is gaining ground.

19.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово NOT CAN так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Excuses, excuses ...

 

For years my husband, Tom, and I had complained bitterly about the lack of sidewalks in our village. We didn’t have enough exercise but we ______ jog because there were no sidewalks.

20.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово I так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Tom had often told ______ , «If only we had sidewalks, we would jog or walk daily and become models of fitness».

21.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово BAD так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

So we were thrilled when a community sidewalk project was announced, and watched eagerly as paving neared completion. Then the ______ thing happened: wishful thinking and reality collided.

22.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово THINK так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

«Well, dear,» Tom said. «What’ll we use as an excuse for not walking now?» I said I ______ of some excuse.

23.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово DECLARE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

In the USA, Memorial Day is the last Monday in May. Memorial Day ______ a national holiday in 1971.

24.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово THEY так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

But the tradition of honoring those who died in defense of ______ country goes back to the Civil War. The tradition to hold memorial services, visit the cemeteries, decorate the graves with flowers and wreaths originated in Waterloo, New York, in 1866.

25.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово CHANGE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Since then, the tradition ______ . Nowadays, on Memorial Day Americans honor not only soldiers who perished in wars but those loved ones who have died.

26.

Образуйте от слова COMPETE однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Texas Rodeo

The rodeo is a really exciting event. It is a thrilling __________________ between cowboys from all over the country.

27.

Образуйте от слова PROFESSION однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

It has a long tradition and even today there are rodeo schools which keep it alive and __________________.

28.

Образуйте от слова VISIT однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

The rodeo is a spectacular sight. If a __________________ has a place in the first row of the arena, he or she may even be sprinkled with sand by the passing horses.

29.

Образуйте от слова PERFORM однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

The __________________ usually starts with an opening ceremony by horsemen dressed in bright colours and carrying flags.

30.

Образуйте от слова CONSTANT однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

All through the show the master of the ceremony __________________ jokes with special clowns.

31.

Образуйте от слова POSSIBLE однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

A rodeo in Texas is certainly an exciting experience which is practically __________________ for a tourist to forget.

32.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) inclined

2) involved

3) included

4) inspired


The dream bridge

This is a real life story of engineer John Roebling building the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, USA back in 1870. The bridge was completed in 1883, after 13 years. In 1869, a creative engineer named John Roebling was 32 ______ by an idea to build a spectacular bridge connecting New York with the Long Island. 33 ______, bridge building experts throughout the world thought that this was an impossible task. They 34 ______ Roebling to forget the idea, as it just could not be done and it was not practical. It had never been done before.

Roebling could not ignore the vision he had in his mind of this bridge. He thought about it all the time and he knew 35 ______ in his heart that it could be done. He just had to 36 ______ the dream with someone else. After much discussion and persuasion he 37 ______ to convince his son Washington, an up and coming engineer, that the bridge in fact could be constructed.

Roeblling had never had any projects with his son before. Working together 38 ______ the first time, the father and son developed concepts of how it could be accomplished and how the obstacles could be overcome. With great excitement and enthusiasm, and the headiness of a wild challenge before them, they hired their crew and began to build their dream bridge.

33.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) However

2) Although

3) Moreover

4) Therefore


The dream bridge

This is a real life story of engineer John Roebling building the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, USA back in 1870. The bridge was completed in 1883, after 13 years. In 1869, a creative engineer named John Roebling was 32 ______ by an idea to build a spectacular bridge connecting New York with the Long Island. 33 ______, bridge building experts throughout the world thought that this was an impossible task. They 34 ______ Roebling to forget the idea, as it just could not be done and it was not practical. It had never been done before.

Roebling could not ignore the vision he had in his mind of this bridge. He thought about it all the time and he knew 35 ______ in his heart that it could be done. He just had to 36 ______ the dream with someone else. After much discussion and persuasion he 37 ______ to convince his son Washington, an up and coming engineer, that the bridge in fact could be constructed.

Roeblling had never had any projects with his son before. Working together 38 ______ the first time, the father and son developed concepts of how it could be accomplished and how the obstacles could be overcome. With great excitement and enthusiasm, and the headiness of a wild challenge before them, they hired their crew and began to build their dream bridge.

34.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) talked

2) told

3) said

4) spoke


The dream bridge

This is a real life story of engineer John Roebling building the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, USA back in 1870. The bridge was completed in 1883, after 13 years. In 1869, a creative engineer named John Roebling was 32 ______ by an idea to build a spectacular bridge connecting New York with the Long Island. 33 ______, bridge building experts throughout the world thought that this was an impossible task. They 34 ______ Roebling to forget the idea, as it just could not be done and it was not practical. It had never been done before.

Roebling could not ignore the vision he had in his mind of this bridge. He thought about it all the time and he knew 35 ______ in his heart that it could be done. He just had to 36 ______ the dream with someone else. After much discussion and persuasion he 37 ______ to convince his son Washington, an up and coming engineer, that the bridge in fact could be constructed.

Roeblling had never had any projects with his son before. Working together 38 ______ the first time, the father and son developed concepts of how it could be accomplished and how the obstacles could be overcome. With great excitement and enthusiasm, and the headiness of a wild challenge before them, they hired their crew and began to build their dream bridge.

35.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) deep

2) far

3) full

4) long


The dream bridge

This is a real life story of engineer John Roebling building the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, USA back in 1870. The bridge was completed in 1883, after 13 years. In 1869, a creative engineer named John Roebling was 32 ______ by an idea to build a spectacular bridge connecting New York with the Long Island. 33 ______, bridge building experts throughout the world thought that this was an impossible task. They 34 ______ Roebling to forget the idea, as it just could not be done and it was not practical. It had never been done before.

Roebling could not ignore the vision he had in his mind of this bridge. He thought about it all the time and he knew 35 ______ in his heart that it could be done. He just had to 36 ______ the dream with someone else. After much discussion and persuasion he 37 ______ to convince his son Washington, an up and coming engineer, that the bridge in fact could be constructed.

Roeblling had never had any projects with his son before. Working together 38 ______ the first time, the father and son developed concepts of how it could be accomplished and how the obstacles could be overcome. With great excitement and enthusiasm, and the headiness of a wild challenge before them, they hired their crew and began to build their dream bridge.

36.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) join

2) unite

3) share

4) divide


The dream bridge

This is a real life story of engineer John Roebling building the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, USA back in 1870. The bridge was completed in 1883, after 13 years. In 1869, a creative engineer named John Roebling was 32 ______ by an idea to build a spectacular bridge connecting New York with the Long Island. 33 ______, bridge building experts throughout the world thought that this was an impossible task. They 34 ______ Roebling to forget the idea, as it just could not be done and it was not practical. It had never been done before.

Roebling could not ignore the vision he had in his mind of this bridge. He thought about it all the time and he knew 35 ______ in his heart that it could be done. He just had to 36 ______ the dream with someone else. After much discussion and persuasion he 37 ______ to convince his son Washington, an up and coming engineer, that the bridge in fact could be constructed.

Roeblling had never had any projects with his son before. Working together 38 ______ the first time, the father and son developed concepts of how it could be accomplished and how the obstacles could be overcome. With great excitement and enthusiasm, and the headiness of a wild challenge before them, they hired their crew and began to build their dream bridge.

37.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) succeeded

2) handled

3) maintained

4) managed


The dream bridge

This is a real life story of engineer John Roebling building the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, USA back in 1870. The bridge was completed in 1883, after 13 years. In 1869, a creative engineer named John Roebling was 32 ______ by an idea to build a spectacular bridge connecting New York with the Long Island. 33 ______, bridge building experts throughout the world thought that this was an impossible task. They 34 ______ Roebling to forget the idea, as it just could not be done and it was not practical. It had never been done before.

Roebling could not ignore the vision he had in his mind of this bridge. He thought about it all the time and he knew 35 ______ in his heart that it could be done. He just had to 36 ______ the dream with someone else. After much discussion and persuasion he 37 ______ to convince his son Washington, an up and coming engineer, that the bridge in fact could be constructed.

Roeblling had never had any projects with his son before. Working together 38 ______ the first time, the father and son developed concepts of how it could be accomplished and how the obstacles could be overcome. With great excitement and enthusiasm, and the headiness of a wild challenge before them, they hired their crew and began to build their dream bridge.

38.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) in

2) on

3) at

4) for


The dream bridge

This is a real life story of engineer John Roebling building the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, USA back in 1870. The bridge was completed in 1883, after 13 years. In 1869, a creative engineer named John Roebling was 32 ______ by an idea to build a spectacular bridge connecting New York with the Long Island. 33 ______, bridge building experts throughout the world thought that this was an impossible task. They 34 ______ Roebling to forget the idea, as it just could not be done and it was not practical. It had never been done before.

Roebling could not ignore the vision he had in his mind of this bridge. He thought about it all the time and he knew 35 ______ in his heart that it could be done. He just had to 36 ______ the dream with someone else. After much discussion and persuasion he 37 ______ to convince his son Washington, an up and coming engineer, that the bridge in fact could be constructed.

Roeblling had never had any projects with his son before. Working together 38 ______ the first time, the father and son developed concepts of how it could be accomplished and how the obstacles could be overcome. With great excitement and enthusiasm, and the headiness of a wild challenge before them, they hired their crew and began to build their dream bridge.

39.

You have received a letter from your English-speaking pen-friend David who writes:

 

… I have finally chosen the college I will try to enter next summer. Which university would you like to go to after school? What would you like to study? What backup plans have you made, if you don't get accepted?

Oh, by the way, do you remember Lucy, my dog? She's just had six puppies!!!…

 

Write a letter to David.

In your letter

- answer her questions

- ask 3 questions about his dog and/or its puppies.

 

Write 100–140 words.

Remember the rules of letter writing.

40.

Выберите только ОДНО из двух предложенных высказываний и выразите своё мнение по предложенной проблеме согласно данному плану.

 

Comment on one of the following statements.

 

1. Some people think that extreme sports help to build character.

2. Reading poetry is becoming less and less important for young people nowadays.

 

 

What is your opinion? Do you agree with this statement? Write 200–250 words. Use the following plan:

− make an introduction (state the problem)

− express your personal opinion and give 2–3 reasons for your opinion

− express an opposing opinion and give 1–2 reasons for this opposing opinion

− explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion

− make a conclusion restating your position

41.

Imagine that you are preparing a project with your friend. You have found some interesting material for the presentation and you want to read this text to your friend. You have 1.5 minutes to read the text silently, then be ready to read it out aloud. You will not have more than 1.5 minutes to read it.

 

Work is a bigger killer than drink, drugs or war. Around two million people die every year from work-related accidents and diseases. Worldwide, the most dangerous jobs are in agriculture, mining and construction. The second most dangerous job was fishing and third was airplane pilots. Nearly all of the pilots died in small-plane crashes, not passenger jets. The third most common cause of death on the job in all occupations was murder. Fifty policemen were murdered. Falls were the second most common cause of death.

Roofers and structural-metalworkers were the main victims. The most common cause of death on the job was the car accident. Even police officers were slightly more likely to die behind the wheel than by homicide. The risk of death can be calculated using the Duckworth scale. It measures the likelihood of dying as a result of any given activity. The safest kind of activity scores zero and eight will result in certain death.

42.

Study the advertisement.

 

 

You are considering using an engineering service and you'd like to get more information. In 1.5 minutes you are to ask five direct questions to find out the following:

1) services that they provide

2) if you can get a discount card

3) if they work at weekends

4) number of clients per day

5) guarantees they provide

You have 20 seconds to ask each question.

43.

These are photos from your photo album. Choose one photo to describe to your friend.

 

 

You will have to start speaking in 1.5 minutes and will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). In your talk remember to speak about:

• where and when the photo was taken

• what/who is in the photo

• what is happening

• why you keep the photo in your album

• why you decided to show the picture to your friend

You have to talk continuously, starting with:

"I’ve chosen photo number… "

44.

Study the two photographs. In 1.5 minutes be ready to compare and contrast the photographs:

 

• give a brief description of the photos (action, location)

• say what the pictures have in common

• say in what way the pictures are different

• say which of the ways of taking care of your health presented in the pictures you’d prefer

• explain why

 

You will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). You have to talk continuously.