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Вариант № 873903

1.

Вы услышите 6 высказываний. Установите соответствие между высказываниями каждого говорящего A–F и утверждениями, данными в списке 1–7. Используйте каждое утверждение, обозначенное соответствующей цифрой, только один раз. В задании есть одно лишнее утверждение. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

1. I feel unhappy because I can’t change public attitude to our planet.

2. I would like to see new energy saving laws introduced.

3. I am afraid of the after-effects of human activities.

4. I am sure that wise attitude to basic earth supplies is necessary.

5. I do not want my family to live in polluted environment.

6. I am for the use of energy saving practices in house construction.

7. I find many simple ways to help our planet in everyday life.

 

 

 

ГоворящийABCDEF
Утверждение

2.

Вы услышите диалог. Определите, какие из приведённых утверждений А–G соответствуют содержанию текста (1 – True), какие не соответствуют (2 – False) и о чём в тексте не сказано, то есть на основании текста нельзя дать ни положительного, ни отрицательного ответа (3 – Not stated). Занесите номер выбранного Вами варианта ответа в таблицу. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

A) Kate is thinking about a present for her former school friend.

B) Kate usually easily chooses presents for her friends.

C) Kate keeps in contact with her friend via a social network.

D) Kate's friend was born in Peru.

E) Kate's friend enjoys local music.

F) Tom believes music preferences reveal a lot about a person.

G) Tom is a connoisseur of the type of music Kate needs.

 

Запишите в ответ цифры, расположив их в порядке, соответствующем буквам:

ABCDEFG
       

3.

Вы услышите интервью дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

What do we learn about Alice at the beginning of the interview?

 

1) She has an Academy award already.

2) She’s 18 years old.

3) She was born in Brazil.

4.

Вы услышите интервью дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Which of the following is TRUE about Alice’s family?

 

1) She takes part in a business with her family.

2) All of her relatives live in São Paolo.

3) Many of her relatives work in show business.

5.

Вы услышите интервью дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

What made Alice want to become an actress?

 

1) A theatre play she once saw.

2) Her school in São Paolo.

3) Glossy magazines about stars.

6.

Вы услышите интервью дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Which is TRUE about Alice’s current project?

 

1) Her character is very beautiful.

2) Her part isn’t in English.

3) Her friend offered her the role.

7.

Вы услышите интервью дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Why did Alice sign up for Queen of the South?

 

1) Because of the film director.

2) Because of the role she had to play.

3) Because she had written the book.

8.

Вы услышите интервью дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

What does Alice’s acting coach help her with?

 

1) Getting to know the character.

2) Memorizing the lines.

3) Suggesting ideas about costumes.

9.

Вы услышите интервью дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

What does Alice say about having to act in English?

 

1) It’s easier when she spends a long time working on it.

2) It’s no problem for her anymore.

3) It makes her translate all the time.

10.

Установите соответствие между текстами A–G и заголовками 1–8. Запишите свои ответы в таблицу. Используйте каждую цифру только один раз. В задании один заголовок лишний.

 

1. Fun in theory, boring in reality

2. Saving rare animals

3. Deficit of activity problems

4. Ready to help

5. Similar sounds — different emotions

6. Benefits of being outdoors

7. Contrary to popular belief

8. Original style

 

A. In addition to being highly intelligent, elephants are capable of a remarkable amount of empathy. During a natural disaster, elephants are able to understand that something dangerous is happening. They can understand that a person is in

trouble and that the situation is unsafe. Elephants have good sense of smell and there have been cases when they alerted rescuers to people trapped in a building. Elephants have been observed saving their young from drowning and also been filmed trying to save people they see at risk of drowning.

B. A lot of studies suggest that green spaces enhance mental health and learning capacity, both immediately and over time, by lowering stress levels and restoring attention. Greenery restores attention by drawing the eye and at the same time calms the nervous system, creating an ideal state for learning. Similarly, studies show that spending time in the sunlight can reduce attention deficit symptoms, while bright light first thing in the morning can improve mood and the quality of sleep.

C. Why are hyenas known for laughing? There is even a phrase we use: “to laugh like a hyena”. Zoologists will tell you that the unique sounds they make are actually no laughing matter. Hyenas indeed make loud barking noises that sound like laughter, but it’s not because they’re amused by anything. Instead, a hyena’s “laughter” is actually a form of communication used to convey frustration, excitement, or fear. Most often, you’ll hear this unique vocalization during a hunt or when the animals are feeding on prey as a group.

D. Zoologists believe that boredom isn’t a uniquely human emotion — animals can be bored, too. Animals which live in captivity (in zoos, for example) and don’t have to take care of their survival may experience boredom and try to find

ways to overcome it. They may come up with some “creative” activities which they wouldn’t normally do in their natural environment. As for the pets at home, they may also suffer from the lack of stimulation. That’s why we need to make sure we give them enough time, attention and toys regularly.

E. While most dogs jump eagerly into the water to swim, cats don’t usually do that, and many believe that cats have a phobia of water. But some pet groomers insist that it’s not true and getting a cat to trust you enough to bathe is quite possible, with some patience and skill. Most cats are not afraid of water like so many people may think. They are actually afraid of loud noises and of drowning, rather than water itself. Cats drink water every day, lots of cats even play with water or follow people into the shower.

F. Videogame testers spend most of their time testing the game long before it’s finished and long before it starts to become a fun experience. Even after the game is developed enough to start being fun, the testing tasks often aren’t

entertaining at all. Testers may have to walk their character around a forest, for example, to look for trees that aren’t drawn well. They then record the coordinates so an artist can fix them later. It’s monotonous work and can take days to finish. So if testing video games seems like a fun, easy job to you, think again.

G. Claude Monet’s impressionist paintings were all about nature. In his works he tried to capture nature as it appeared to him at the moment. He also experimented with light and shadow and how they changed during different times of the day. Some artists of the time criticized Monet because his works lacked detail and didn’t resemble finished paintings. Monet used strong colours, which he did not mix. He painted them onto the canvas in short brush strokes. He was also criticized for not using classical painting techniques.

 

ТекстABCDEFG
Заголовок

11.

Прочитайте текст и заполните пропуски A–F частями предложений, обозначенными цифрами 1–7. Одна из частей в списке 1–7 — лишняя. Занесите цифры, обозначающие соответствующие части предложений, в таблицу.

 

Unique nature of Kamchatka

 

Kamchatka is a peninsula located in the north-eastern part of Russia. It is surrounded with the Okhotskoye Sea, the Beringovo Sea and the Pacific Ocean. This region has a very unique environment A____________________ one is looking for picturesque views, unforgettable travels and unity with nature.

Kamchatka is famous for its volcanoes, B____________________. Volcanoes are represented on Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, the most eastern city in the northern hemisphere, coat of arms as well. There are more than 300 volcanoes

in Kamchatka, from 28 up to 36 of them are active, or potentially active. Kamchatka volcanoes are included in the list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

The region is also known C____________________ — rivers and lakes. Many Kamchatka rivers spring from mountain tops and glaciers, that is why they are very clean, and it is wonderful for those D_____________________. In general, there are up to 14 thousand rivers and streams, 100 thousand lakes and 414 glaciers in Kamchatka.

Kamchatka is a home to the Valley of Geysers, E_____________________ geysers in the world, after Icelandic geyser fields. It is not easily accessible, as long as it is too unique to be opened for tourists all the time. The Valley of Geysers’ ecosystem is very vulnerable, F_____________________ and regulate the visiting. In fact, the larger part of Kamchatka is preserved. There are many nature reserves and nature parks in Kamchatka.

 

1. which are depicted on most souvenirs there

2. so it is necessary to monitor it all the time

3. who love fishing, including Kamchatka bears

4. which has the second largest concentration of

5. to be a place of many water sources

6. to be a popular nature reserve and health resort

7. that makes it a place to visit when

 

ПропускABCDEF
Часть предложения

12.

The narrator said that he liked London cab drivers because they

 

1) can be trusted and nice to deal with.

2) can drive in a straight line.

3) know all the hotels and streets in the city.

4) make friends easily.


Hazlitt’s Hotel

I took a cab to Hazlitt’s Hotel on Frith Street. I like Hazlitt’s because it’s intentionally obscure — it doesn’t have a sign or a plaque or anything at all to betray its purpose — which puts you in a rare position of strength with your cab driver. Let me say right now that London cab drivers are without question the finest in the world. They are trustworthy, safe and honest, generally friendly and always polite. They keep their vehicles spotless inside and out, and they will put themselves to the most extraordinary inconvenience to drop you at the front entrance of your destination. There are really only a couple of odd things about them. One is that they cannot drive more than two hundred feet in a straight line. I’ve never understood this, but no matter where you are or what the driving conditions, every two hundred feet a little bell goes off in their heads and they abruptly lunge down a side street. And when you get to your hotel or railway station or wherever it is you are going, they like to drive you all the way around it so that you can see it from all angles before alighting.

 

The other distinctive thing about them, and the reason I like to go to Hazlitt’s, is that they cannot bear to admit that they don’t know the location of something they feel they ought to know, like a hotel, which I think is rather sweet. To become a London cab driver you have to master something titled The Knowledge — in effect, learn every street, hospital, hotel, police station, cricket ground, cemetery and other notable landmarks in this amazingly vast and confusing city. It takes years and the cabbies are justifiably proud of their achievement. It would kill them to admit that there could exist in central London a hotel that they have never heard of. So what the cabbie does is probe. He drives in no particular direction for a block or two, then glances at you in the mirror and in an overcasual voice says, “Hazlitt’s — that’s the one on Curzon Street, innit, guv? Opposite the Blue Lion?” But the instant he sees a knowing smile of demurral forming on your lips, he hastily says, “No, hang on a minute, I’m thinking of the Hazelbury. Yeah, the Hazelbury. You want Hazlitt’s, right?” He’ll drive on a bit in a fairly random direction. “That’s this side of Shepherd’s Bush, innit?” he’ll suggest speculatively.

 

When you tell him that it’s on Frith Street, he says. “Yeah, that the one. Course it is. I know it — modern place, lots of glass”.

 

“Actually, it’s an eighteenth-century brick building.”

“Course it is. I know it.” And he immediately executes a dramatic U-turn, causing a passing cyclist to steer into a lamppost (but that’s all right because he has on cycle clips and one of those geeky slip stream helmets that all but invite you to knock him over). “Yeah, you had me thinking of the Hazelbury” the driver adds, chuckling as if to say it’s a lucky thing he sorted that one out for you, and then lunges down a little side street off the Strand called Running Sore Lane or Sphincter Passage, which, like so much else in London, you had never noticed was there before. 

13.

Which of the following statements about London cab drivers is true according to the narrator?

 

1) They prefer driving in a straight line.

2) They prefer side streets to main streets.

3) They have little bells in their cars.

4) They let you see your hotel from all angles.


Hazlitt’s Hotel

I took a cab to Hazlitt’s Hotel on Frith Street. I like Hazlitt’s because it’s intentionally obscure — it doesn’t have a sign or a plaque or anything at all to betray its purpose — which puts you in a rare position of strength with your cab driver. Let me say right now that London cab drivers are without question the finest in the world. They are trustworthy, safe and honest, generally friendly and always polite. They keep their vehicles spotless inside and out, and they will put themselves to the most extraordinary inconvenience to drop you at the front entrance of your destination. There are really only a couple of odd things about them. One is that they cannot drive more than two hundred feet in a straight line. I’ve never understood this, but no matter where you are or what the driving conditions, every two hundred feet a little bell goes off in their heads and they abruptly lunge down a side street. And when you get to your hotel or railway station or wherever it is you are going, they like to drive you all the way around it so that you can see it from all angles before alighting.

 

The other distinctive thing about them, and the reason I like to go to Hazlitt’s, is that they cannot bear to admit that they don’t know the location of something they feel they ought to know, like a hotel, which I think is rather sweet. To become a London cab driver you have to master something titled The Knowledge — in effect, learn every street, hospital, hotel, police station, cricket ground, cemetery and other notable landmarks in this amazingly vast and confusing city. It takes years and the cabbies are justifiably proud of their achievement. It would kill them to admit that there could exist in central London a hotel that they have never heard of. So what the cabbie does is probe. He drives in no particular direction for a block or two, then glances at you in the mirror and in an overcasual voice says, “Hazlitt’s — that’s the one on Curzon Street, innit, guv? Opposite the Blue Lion?” But the instant he sees a knowing smile of demurral forming on your lips, he hastily says, “No, hang on a minute, I’m thinking of the Hazelbury. Yeah, the Hazelbury. You want Hazlitt’s, right?” He’ll drive on a bit in a fairly random direction. “That’s this side of Shepherd’s Bush, innit?” he’ll suggest speculatively.

 

When you tell him that it’s on Frith Street, he says. “Yeah, that the one. Course it is. I know it — modern place, lots of glass”.

 

“Actually, it’s an eighteenth-century brick building.”

“Course it is. I know it.” And he immediately executes a dramatic U-turn, causing a passing cyclist to steer into a lamppost (but that’s all right because he has on cycle clips and one of those geeky slip stream helmets that all but invite you to knock him over). “Yeah, you had me thinking of the Hazelbury” the driver adds, chuckling as if to say it’s a lucky thing he sorted that one out for you, and then lunges down a little side street off the Strand called Running Sore Lane or Sphincter Passage, which, like so much else in London, you had never noticed was there before. 

14.

A reason why the narrator liked to go to Hazlitt’s was that

 

1) cab drivers liked driving there.

2) it was in the center of the city.

3) cab drivers didn’t know where it was.

4) it was an old brick building.


Hazlitt’s Hotel

I took a cab to Hazlitt’s Hotel on Frith Street. I like Hazlitt’s because it’s intentionally obscure — it doesn’t have a sign or a plaque or anything at all to betray its purpose — which puts you in a rare position of strength with your cab driver. Let me say right now that London cab drivers are without question the finest in the world. They are trustworthy, safe and honest, generally friendly and always polite. They keep their vehicles spotless inside and out, and they will put themselves to the most extraordinary inconvenience to drop you at the front entrance of your destination. There are really only a couple of odd things about them. One is that they cannot drive more than two hundred feet in a straight line. I’ve never understood this, but no matter where you are or what the driving conditions, every two hundred feet a little bell goes off in their heads and they abruptly lunge down a side street. And when you get to your hotel or railway station or wherever it is you are going, they like to drive you all the way around it so that you can see it from all angles before alighting.

 

The other distinctive thing about them, and the reason I like to go to Hazlitt’s, is that they cannot bear to admit that they don’t know the location of something they feel they ought to know, like a hotel, which I think is rather sweet. To become a London cab driver you have to master something titled The Knowledge — in effect, learn every street, hospital, hotel, police station, cricket ground, cemetery and other notable landmarks in this amazingly vast and confusing city. It takes years and the cabbies are justifiably proud of their achievement. It would kill them to admit that there could exist in central London a hotel that they have never heard of. So what the cabbie does is probe. He drives in no particular direction for a block or two, then glances at you in the mirror and in an overcasual voice says, “Hazlitt’s — that’s the one on Curzon Street, innit, guv? Opposite the Blue Lion?” But the instant he sees a knowing smile of demurral forming on your lips, he hastily says, “No, hang on a minute, I’m thinking of the Hazelbury. Yeah, the Hazelbury. You want Hazlitt’s, right?” He’ll drive on a bit in a fairly random direction. “That’s this side of Shepherd’s Bush, innit?” he’ll suggest speculatively.

 

When you tell him that it’s on Frith Street, he says. “Yeah, that the one. Course it is. I know it — modern place, lots of glass”.

 

“Actually, it’s an eighteenth-century brick building.”

“Course it is. I know it.” And he immediately executes a dramatic U-turn, causing a passing cyclist to steer into a lamppost (but that’s all right because he has on cycle clips and one of those geeky slip stream helmets that all but invite you to knock him over). “Yeah, you had me thinking of the Hazelbury” the driver adds, chuckling as if to say it’s a lucky thing he sorted that one out for you, and then lunges down a little side street off the Strand called Running Sore Lane or Sphincter Passage, which, like so much else in London, you had never noticed was there before. 

15.

According to the narrator, to be a London cab driver, one has to

 

1) be ready to study the city for years.

2) be knowledgeable.

3) be proud of the city.

4) know all streets and places in London.


Hazlitt’s Hotel

I took a cab to Hazlitt’s Hotel on Frith Street. I like Hazlitt’s because it’s intentionally obscure — it doesn’t have a sign or a plaque or anything at all to betray its purpose — which puts you in a rare position of strength with your cab driver. Let me say right now that London cab drivers are without question the finest in the world. They are trustworthy, safe and honest, generally friendly and always polite. They keep their vehicles spotless inside and out, and they will put themselves to the most extraordinary inconvenience to drop you at the front entrance of your destination. There are really only a couple of odd things about them. One is that they cannot drive more than two hundred feet in a straight line. I’ve never understood this, but no matter where you are or what the driving conditions, every two hundred feet a little bell goes off in their heads and they abruptly lunge down a side street. And when you get to your hotel or railway station or wherever it is you are going, they like to drive you all the way around it so that you can see it from all angles before alighting.

 

The other distinctive thing about them, and the reason I like to go to Hazlitt’s, is that they cannot bear to admit that they don’t know the location of something they feel they ought to know, like a hotel, which I think is rather sweet. To become a London cab driver you have to master something titled The Knowledge — in effect, learn every street, hospital, hotel, police station, cricket ground, cemetery and other notable landmarks in this amazingly vast and confusing city. It takes years and the cabbies are justifiably proud of their achievement. It would kill them to admit that there could exist in central London a hotel that they have never heard of. So what the cabbie does is probe. He drives in no particular direction for a block or two, then glances at you in the mirror and in an overcasual voice says, “Hazlitt’s — that’s the one on Curzon Street, innit, guv? Opposite the Blue Lion?” But the instant he sees a knowing smile of demurral forming on your lips, he hastily says, “No, hang on a minute, I’m thinking of the Hazelbury. Yeah, the Hazelbury. You want Hazlitt’s, right?” He’ll drive on a bit in a fairly random direction. “That’s this side of Shepherd’s Bush, innit?” he’ll suggest speculatively.

 

When you tell him that it’s on Frith Street, he says. “Yeah, that the one. Course it is. I know it — modern place, lots of glass”.

 

“Actually, it’s an eighteenth-century brick building.”

“Course it is. I know it.” And he immediately executes a dramatic U-turn, causing a passing cyclist to steer into a lamppost (but that’s all right because he has on cycle clips and one of those geeky slip stream helmets that all but invite you to knock him over). “Yeah, you had me thinking of the Hazelbury” the driver adds, chuckling as if to say it’s a lucky thing he sorted that one out for you, and then lunges down a little side street off the Strand called Running Sore Lane or Sphincter Passage, which, like so much else in London, you had never noticed was there before. 

16.

According to the narrator, if the cab driver did not know a hotel in London he would

 

1) panic.

2) ask the passenger.

3) use a map.

4) never admit it.


Hazlitt’s Hotel

I took a cab to Hazlitt’s Hotel on Frith Street. I like Hazlitt’s because it’s intentionally obscure — it doesn’t have a sign or a plaque or anything at all to betray its purpose — which puts you in a rare position of strength with your cab driver. Let me say right now that London cab drivers are without question the finest in the world. They are trustworthy, safe and honest, generally friendly and always polite. They keep their vehicles spotless inside and out, and they will put themselves to the most extraordinary inconvenience to drop you at the front entrance of your destination. There are really only a couple of odd things about them. One is that they cannot drive more than two hundred feet in a straight line. I’ve never understood this, but no matter where you are or what the driving conditions, every two hundred feet a little bell goes off in their heads and they abruptly lunge down a side street. And when you get to your hotel or railway station or wherever it is you are going, they like to drive you all the way around it so that you can see it from all angles before alighting.

 

The other distinctive thing about them, and the reason I like to go to Hazlitt’s, is that they cannot bear to admit that they don’t know the location of something they feel they ought to know, like a hotel, which I think is rather sweet. To become a London cab driver you have to master something titled The Knowledge — in effect, learn every street, hospital, hotel, police station, cricket ground, cemetery and other notable landmarks in this amazingly vast and confusing city. It takes years and the cabbies are justifiably proud of their achievement. It would kill them to admit that there could exist in central London a hotel that they have never heard of. So what the cabbie does is probe. He drives in no particular direction for a block or two, then glances at you in the mirror and in an overcasual voice says, “Hazlitt’s — that’s the one on Curzon Street, innit, guv? Opposite the Blue Lion?” But the instant he sees a knowing smile of demurral forming on your lips, he hastily says, “No, hang on a minute, I’m thinking of the Hazelbury. Yeah, the Hazelbury. You want Hazlitt’s, right?” He’ll drive on a bit in a fairly random direction. “That’s this side of Shepherd’s Bush, innit?” he’ll suggest speculatively.

 

When you tell him that it’s on Frith Street, he says. “Yeah, that the one. Course it is. I know it — modern place, lots of glass”.

 

“Actually, it’s an eighteenth-century brick building.”

“Course it is. I know it.” And he immediately executes a dramatic U-turn, causing a passing cyclist to steer into a lamppost (but that’s all right because he has on cycle clips and one of those geeky slip stream helmets that all but invite you to knock him over). “Yeah, you had me thinking of the Hazelbury” the driver adds, chuckling as if to say it’s a lucky thing he sorted that one out for you, and then lunges down a little side street off the Strand called Running Sore Lane or Sphincter Passage, which, like so much else in London, you had never noticed was there before. 

17.

According to the narrator, when the driver finally knows where to go, he would

 

1) speed up.

2) say you are lucky he knew the place.

3) turn the car in the opposite direction.

4) admit he was confused at first.


Hazlitt’s Hotel

I took a cab to Hazlitt’s Hotel on Frith Street. I like Hazlitt’s because it’s intentionally obscure — it doesn’t have a sign or a plaque or anything at all to betray its purpose — which puts you in a rare position of strength with your cab driver. Let me say right now that London cab drivers are without question the finest in the world. They are trustworthy, safe and honest, generally friendly and always polite. They keep their vehicles spotless inside and out, and they will put themselves to the most extraordinary inconvenience to drop you at the front entrance of your destination. There are really only a couple of odd things about them. One is that they cannot drive more than two hundred feet in a straight line. I’ve never understood this, but no matter where you are or what the driving conditions, every two hundred feet a little bell goes off in their heads and they abruptly lunge down a side street. And when you get to your hotel or railway station or wherever it is you are going, they like to drive you all the way around it so that you can see it from all angles before alighting.

 

The other distinctive thing about them, and the reason I like to go to Hazlitt’s, is that they cannot bear to admit that they don’t know the location of something they feel they ought to know, like a hotel, which I think is rather sweet. To become a London cab driver you have to master something titled The Knowledge — in effect, learn every street, hospital, hotel, police station, cricket ground, cemetery and other notable landmarks in this amazingly vast and confusing city. It takes years and the cabbies are justifiably proud of their achievement. It would kill them to admit that there could exist in central London a hotel that they have never heard of. So what the cabbie does is probe. He drives in no particular direction for a block or two, then glances at you in the mirror and in an overcasual voice says, “Hazlitt’s — that’s the one on Curzon Street, innit, guv? Opposite the Blue Lion?” But the instant he sees a knowing smile of demurral forming on your lips, he hastily says, “No, hang on a minute, I’m thinking of the Hazelbury. Yeah, the Hazelbury. You want Hazlitt’s, right?” He’ll drive on a bit in a fairly random direction. “That’s this side of Shepherd’s Bush, innit?” he’ll suggest speculatively.

 

When you tell him that it’s on Frith Street, he says. “Yeah, that the one. Course it is. I know it — modern place, lots of glass”.

 

“Actually, it’s an eighteenth-century brick building.”

“Course it is. I know it.” And he immediately executes a dramatic U-turn, causing a passing cyclist to steer into a lamppost (but that’s all right because he has on cycle clips and one of those geeky slip stream helmets that all but invite you to knock him over). “Yeah, you had me thinking of the Hazelbury” the driver adds, chuckling as if to say it’s a lucky thing he sorted that one out for you, and then lunges down a little side street off the Strand called Running Sore Lane or Sphincter Passage, which, like so much else in London, you had never noticed was there before. 

18.

What is the narrator’s general attitude towards London cab drivers?

 

1) Ironic.

2) Supportive.

3) Accusatory.

4) Critical.


Hazlitt’s Hotel

I took a cab to Hazlitt’s Hotel on Frith Street. I like Hazlitt’s because it’s intentionally obscure — it doesn’t have a sign or a plaque or anything at all to betray its purpose — which puts you in a rare position of strength with your cab driver. Let me say right now that London cab drivers are without question the finest in the world. They are trustworthy, safe and honest, generally friendly and always polite. They keep their vehicles spotless inside and out, and they will put themselves to the most extraordinary inconvenience to drop you at the front entrance of your destination. There are really only a couple of odd things about them. One is that they cannot drive more than two hundred feet in a straight line. I’ve never understood this, but no matter where you are or what the driving conditions, every two hundred feet a little bell goes off in their heads and they abruptly lunge down a side street. And when you get to your hotel or railway station or wherever it is you are going, they like to drive you all the way around it so that you can see it from all angles before alighting.

 

The other distinctive thing about them, and the reason I like to go to Hazlitt’s, is that they cannot bear to admit that they don’t know the location of something they feel they ought to know, like a hotel, which I think is rather sweet. To become a London cab driver you have to master something titled The Knowledge — in effect, learn every street, hospital, hotel, police station, cricket ground, cemetery and other notable landmarks in this amazingly vast and confusing city. It takes years and the cabbies are justifiably proud of their achievement. It would kill them to admit that there could exist in central London a hotel that they have never heard of. So what the cabbie does is probe. He drives in no particular direction for a block or two, then glances at you in the mirror and in an overcasual voice says, “Hazlitt’s — that’s the one on Curzon Street, innit, guv? Opposite the Blue Lion?” But the instant he sees a knowing smile of demurral forming on your lips, he hastily says, “No, hang on a minute, I’m thinking of the Hazelbury. Yeah, the Hazelbury. You want Hazlitt’s, right?” He’ll drive on a bit in a fairly random direction. “That’s this side of Shepherd’s Bush, innit?” he’ll suggest speculatively.

 

When you tell him that it’s on Frith Street, he says. “Yeah, that the one. Course it is. I know it — modern place, lots of glass”.

 

“Actually, it’s an eighteenth-century brick building.”

“Course it is. I know it.” And he immediately executes a dramatic U-turn, causing a passing cyclist to steer into a lamppost (but that’s all right because he has on cycle clips and one of those geeky slip stream helmets that all but invite you to knock him over). “Yeah, you had me thinking of the Hazelbury” the driver adds, chuckling as if to say it’s a lucky thing he sorted that one out for you, and then lunges down a little side street off the Strand called Running Sore Lane or Sphincter Passage, which, like so much else in London, you had never noticed was there before. 

19.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово I так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

 

Singing in the car

 

My elder brother likes all kinds of music. He prefers jazz but also listens to pop music and sometimes goes to classical music concerts. But when driving ______ in his car, he insists on listening to heavy-metal music.

20.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово NOT CAN так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

For a long time I ______ understand why he was doing it.

21.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово BAD так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

He knew very well that for me it was the ______ kind of music.

22.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово LISTEN так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

One day I decided to ask him why he always chose this type while driving. “Well, sister,” he reluctantly replied, “to be frank, it’s mainly so you can’t sing along.” He added that he ______ to anything else if only I promised not to sing along.

23.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово ONE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

 

St. Patrick’s Day, March 17

 

St. Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland. On March 17 there is a great celebration with the major parade in Dublin and smaller parades all over Ireland. In New York the ______ St. Patrick’s Day celebration took place in 1762.

24.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово CELEBRATE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

On March 15, 1992 St. Patrick’s Day ______ in Moscow. Thousands of delighted Muscovites gathered at Novy Arbat to watch the parade of marching bands, Cossack horsemen and floats of Russian and Irish companies.

25.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово HOLD так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Since then, St. Patrick’s Day parades ______ in Moscow every year.

26.

Образуйте от слова USUAL однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

 

Entertaining guests

 

The most usual way to entertain friends at home is to invite them for a meal, either in the evening or at lunch-time on a Sunday. When guests are invited for a meal, they often sit and chat while they have a drink before the meal, and coffee is ______ served afterwards.

27.

Образуйте от слова ACHIEVE однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Several close friends are sometimes invited at once to make a small party to celebrate a birthday, a child’s coming of age or some special ______ .

28.

Образуйте от слова FORMAL однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

These parties are almost always ______ , there is no dress code and in summer, when the weather is fine, people may hold a barbecue in the garden.

29.

Образуйте от слова INVITE однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Formal occasions, official receptions for foreign visitors, when written ______ are sent, rarely take place in people’s homes, although they did in the past.

30.

Образуйте от слова VARY однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

The host often provides ______ kinds of entertainment,or at least entertains guests with interesting stories and merry jokes.

31.

Образуйте от слова TASTE однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

The ______ meal is often followed by party games or dances which are intended to amuse or interest people in a way that gives them pleasure and make them enjoy the party.

32.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) obliged

2) demanded

3) required

4) compelled


Diana

 

Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 32 ______ the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn't hesitate to 33 ______ her that they had lost two similar contracts that week.

 

To 34 ______ the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00.

 

Diana adored her children. At first 35 ______ she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 36 ______ moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic.

 

She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 37 ______ hastily on a Friday evening could be 38 ______ in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

33.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) recall

2) remember

3) recollect

4) remind


Diana

 

Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 32 ______ the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn't hesitate to 33 ______ her that they had lost two similar contracts that week.

 

To 34 ______ the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00.

 

Diana adored her children. At first 35 ______ she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 36 ______ moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic.

 

She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 37 ______ hastily on a Friday evening could be 38 ______ in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

34.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) tell

2) speak

3) talk

4) say


Diana

 

Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 32 ______ the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn't hesitate to 33 ______ her that they had lost two similar contracts that week.

 

To 34 ______ the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00.

 

Diana adored her children. At first 35 ______ she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 36 ______ moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic.

 

She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 37 ______ hastily on a Friday evening could be 38 ______ in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

35.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) glimpse

2) look

3) sight

4) view


Diana

 

Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 32 ______ the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn't hesitate to 33 ______ her that they had lost two similar contracts that week.

 

To 34 ______ the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00.

 

Diana adored her children. At first 35 ______ she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 36 ______ moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic.

 

She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 37 ______ hastily on a Friday evening could be 38 ______ in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

36.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) few

2) little

3) much

4) many


Diana

 

Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 32 ______ the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn't hesitate to 33 ______ her that they had lost two similar contracts that week.

 

To 34 ______ the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00.

 

Diana adored her children. At first 35 ______ she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 36 ______ moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic.

 

She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 37 ______ hastily on a Friday evening could be 38 ______ in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

37.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) took

2) made

3) held

4) done


Diana

 

Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 32 ______ the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn't hesitate to 33 ______ her that they had lost two similar contracts that week.

 

To 34 ______ the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00.

 

Diana adored her children. At first 35 ______ she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 36 ______ moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic.

 

She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 37 ______ hastily on a Friday evening could be 38 ______ in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

38.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) disappointed

2) dissatisfied

3) apologized

4) regretted


Diana

 

Diana had been hoping to get away by 5:00, so she could be at the farm in time for dinner. She tried not to show her true feelings when at 4:37 her deputy, Phil Haskings, presented her with a complex twelve-page document that 32 ______ the signature of a director before it could be sent out to the client. Haskins didn't hesitate to 33 ______ her that they had lost two similar contracts that week.

 

To 34 ______ the truth, it was always the same on a Friday. The phones would go quiet in the middle of the afternoon and then, just as she thought she could leave, a new document would land on her desk. Diana looked at the document and knew there would be no chance of escaping before 6:00.

 

Diana adored her children. At first 35 ______ she looked happy. The demands of being a single parent as well as a director of a small but thriving City company meant there were 36 ______ moments left in any day to relax. When it came to the one weekend in four that James and Caroline spent with her ex-husband, Diana would try to leave the office a little earlier than usual to avoid the weekend traffic.

 

She read through the first page slowly, aware that any mistake 37 ______ hastily on a Friday evening could be 38 ______ in the weeks to come. She glanced at the clock on her desk as the signed the final page of the document. It was just showing 5:51.

39.

You have received a letter from your English-speaking pen-friend Mike who writes:

 

... Next week we’re presenting orally the results of our individual projects in science. My project is good, but I hate oral assessment in general and I’m afraid I won’t present my project well orally. Do you have projects? How often do your teachers ask you to make projects in different subjects? What do you prefer: written reports or oral presentations? ... Imagine my brother Dan will have no homework for the whole term! His class’s been chosen for the experimental group by his school administration!!! …

 

Write a letter to Mike. In your letter answer her questions, ask 3 questions about the Dan’s reaction to the experiment. Write 100—140 words. Remember the rules of letter writing. You have 20 minutes to do this task.

40.

Выберите только ОДНО из двух предложенных высказываний и выразите своё мнение по предложенной проблеме согласно данному плану.

 

Comment on one of the following statements.

 

1. It's more enjoyable to live in a big family.

2. Some parents think that having a computer at home will help their children to get a better education.

 

What is your opinion? Do you agree with this statement? Write 200–250 words. Use the following plan:

− make an introduction (state the problem)

− express your personal opinion and give 2–3 reasons for your opinion

− express an opposing opinion and give 1–2 reasons for this opposing opinion

− explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion

− make a conclusion restating your position

41.

Imagine that you are preparing a project with your friend. You have found some interesting material for the presentation and you want to read this text to your friend. You have 1.5 minutes to read the text silently, then be ready to read it out aloud. You will not have more than 1.5 minutes to read it.

 

For crocodiles an ordinary rubber band should be sufficient for you to make your escape. The muscles that close the jaws of a crocodile or alligator are strong. They have the same downward force of a truck falling off a cliff. But the muscles that open their jaws are weak enough for you to hold their mouths shut with one hand. The technical difference between alligators and crocodiles is that crocs have a longer, narrower snout, eyes further forward.

Also, some crocodiles live in salty water. Alligators generally live in fresh water. Crocodile means lizard. Neither animal cries as it savages you to death. Crocodile tears are a myth from medieval times. The origin of the legend may be in the proximity of the throat to the glands which lubricate the eye. These can cause the eye to water a little from the effort of swallowing something large or reluctant. They can’t smile either: crocodiles and alligators have no lips.

42.

Study the advertisement.

 

 

You are considering visiting the city and now you'd like to get more information. In 1.5 minutes you are to ask five direct questions to find out the following:

1) dates for departures

2) hotel facilities

3) if breakfast is included

4) number of city tours

5) discounts

You have 20 seconds to ask each question.

43.

These are photos from your photo album. Choose one photo to describe to your friend.

 

 

You will have to start speaking in 1.5 minutes and will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). In your talk remember to speak about:

 

• where and when the photo was taken

• what/who is in the photo

• what is happening

• why you keep the photo in your album

• why you decided to show the picture to your friend

 

You have to talk continuously, starting with: "I’ve chosen photo number … ".

44.

Study the two photographs. In 1.5 minutes be ready to compare and contrast the photographs:

• give a brief description of the photos (action, location)

• say what the pictures have in common

• say in what way the pictures are different

• say which way of watching films presented in the pictures you prefer

• explain why

You will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). You have to talk continuously.