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Вариант № 1073201

1.

Вы услышите 6 высказываний. Установите соответствие между высказываниями каждого говорящего A–F и утверждениями, данными в списке 1–7. Используйте каждое утверждение, обозначенное соответствующей цифрой, только один раз. В задании есть одно лишнее утверждение. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

1. Before such tours you should learn how to move and breathe in rapid water.

2. This company ignores tourists’ safety.

3. Rafting can be life-threatening.

4. This kind of tour is for strong and fit people.

5. Professional staff make these difficult tours fun.

6. If you secure your life jacket properly, you’ll come home safely.

7. Team spirit and optimism are important in such tours.

 

ГоворящийABCDEF
Утверждение

2.

Вы услышите диалог. Определите, какие из приведённых утверждений А–G соответствуют содержанию текста (1 – True), какие не соответствуют (2 – False) и о чём в тексте не сказано, то есть на основании текста нельзя дать ни положительного, ни отрицательного ответа (3 – Not stated). Занесите номер выбранного Вами варианта ответа в таблицу. Вы услышите запись дважды.

 

 

1. Joan and Steve begin with settling the date of the party.

2. Joan and Steve were satisfied with the last year's party.

3. Steve is not sure how to spell the name of the new Indian restaurant.

4. Steve visited the Park View Hotel before.

5. Joan will call the restaurants.

6. Joan and Steve agree on the price of £12 a head.

7. The boss of Joan and Steve is a vegetarian.

 

Запишите в ответ цифры, расположив их в порядке, соответствующем буквам:

ABCDEFG
       

3.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

I Fred describes the outgoing year as the one which

 

1) brought him new financial problems.

2) seriously changed his whole life.

3) marked the end of his construction business.

4.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Fred worked with the children who

 

1) lacked some physical ability.

2) attended a weekend school.

3) had to stay in a hospital.

5.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

When dealing with the children Fred was instructed to

 

1) be aware of their depression.

2) try to avoid getting them excited.

3) behave in the usual way.

6.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The new experience helped Fred to become more

 

1) persistent.

2) determined in doing what he wanted.

3) patient.

7.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Fred says that before becoming a father he was particularly good at

 

1) losing the time.

2) spending the leisure hours.

3) entertaining his friends.

8.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

The parenthood made Fred

 

1) pay more attention to sports activities.

2) spend less time at work.

3) more responsible.

9.

Вы услышите репортаж дважды. Выберите правильный ответ 1, 2 или 3.

 

 

Fred mentions as his special father’s talent the ability

 

1) to understand his wife.

2) for a sound sleep.

3) to calm down a crying child.

10.

Установите соответствие между заголовками 1–8 и текстами A–G. Запишите свои ответы в таблицу. Используйте каждую цифру только один раз. В задании есть один лишний заголовок.

 

1. National language

2. Freedom of media

3. Customs and traditions

4. Public transport

5. Geography

6. Leisure and sport

7. Modern history

8. Economic outlook

 

A. Lithuania is situated on the eastern Baltic coast and borders Latvia in the north, the Kaliningrad region of the Russian Federation and Poland in the southwest, and Belarus in the southwest and east. The geometrical centre of Europe lies in eastern Lithuania 25km north of its capital Vilnius. The landscape varies between lowland plains and hilly uplands and has a complex network of rivers.

 

B. Lithuania has historically been the least developed of the Baltic republics, with a smaller industrial base and greater dependence on agriculture. Sugar beet, cereals, potatoes and vegetables are the main crops. Lithuania’s foreign trade was gradually changing during the 1990s, and now the European Union, not Russia, is its main trading partner.

 

C. Lithuanian is the mother tongue for 80% of the population. After the country joined the European Union in 2004 this language has become one of the EU official languages. Lithuania has a large number of dialects for such a small territory, including High Lithuanian and Low Lithuanian.

 

D. Lithuania offers different opportunities for a nice vacation. You can explore a range of large sand dunes and pine forests while hiking in the Curonian Spit National Park, take part in some action sports in Nida, a village that makes a true paradise for sailing, windsurfing, paragliding and kiting, or try out more extreme sports, such as hot-air ballooning and gliding.

 

E. Those who are interested in folklore may enjoy their stay in Lithuania in any season of the year. The Mardi Gras celebrations are held in various Lithuanian cities and small towns at the beginning of February. The Folklore Festival is held in Vilnius’ Old Town during in May. There you can see craft fairs, taste traditional dishes, join song and parties and listen to psalms.

 

F. Lithuania’s TV market is dominated by commercial channels. The radio market is similarly competitive. Lithuania’s media are free and operate independently of the state, and there are no government-owned newspapers. However, politicians do occasionally attempt to influence editorial policy.

 

G. In cities and towns there are buses and trolleybuses, which usually run from 05.00 to 23.00, but times do vary between routes. You can’t pay the fare to the driver in cash but you can buy coupons from him. Coupons can be also bought at news kiosks before boarding. Minibuses are less crowded but more expensive.

 

 

ТекстABCDEFG
Заголовок

11.

Прочитайте текст и заполните пропуски A–F частями предложений, обозначенными цифрами 1–7. Одна из частей в списке 1–7 — лишняя. Занесите цифры, обозначающие соответствующие части предложений, в таблицу.

 

Beaches of Portugal

 

Covering more than 850 km, the Portuguese coast boasts such a large number of fine, white sandy beaches that it is almost impossible to keep count. All bathed by the Atlantic Ocean and all different, their beauty is hard to describe, so there is nothing better A ______________________.

The most famous are in the Algarve. With three thousand hours of sun per year and warm waters, there are beaches to suit every taste and many dreamlike resorts. The choices are many, from sandy stretches extending as far as the eye can see B ______________________, the trade image of the region. They are always accompanied by a calm clear sea, C ______________________.

In Costa da Caparica, the beaches are particularly dear to Lisbonites D ______________________ for sun and sea bathing. There are deserted beaches here too, of a wild beauty, E ______________________ nature. In the centre, tourists will find very wide sandy stretches, to which traditional fishing adds a picturesque touch. And further north, the colder waters and the invigorating sea are tempered by the welcoming atmosphere and the clean air of the mountains and the forests.

Despite all their differences, all beaches share one thing – quality. They are safe and offer a wide range of support and recreational services, F ______________________. And a large number of Portuguese beaches are granted the European blue flag every year, a distinction that is a sign of their excellent conditions.

 

1. where one can enjoy close contact with

2. which meet every need of their users

3. than to discover them once for oneself

4. who has never been to this wonderful city

5. which is ideal for various water sports

6. to the smaller coves, sheltered by huge cliffs

7. who have different options around the capital

 

ПропускABCDEF
Часть предложения

12.

Llandudno is described as a

 

1) fashionable 19th century resort.

2) beautiful growing resort.

3) place where Lewis Carroll lived.

4) place famous for its comfortable hotels.


Llandudno

Llandudno is truly a fine and handsome place, built on a generously proportioned bay and lined along its broad front with a huddle of prim but gracious nineteenth- century hotels that reminded me in the fading light of a lineup of Victorian nannies. Llandudno was purpose-built as a resort in the mid-1800s, and it cultivates a nice old-fashioned air. I don’t suppose that Lewis Carroll, who famously strolled this front with little Alice Liddell in the 1860s, would notice a great deal of change today.

 

To my consternation, the town was packed with weekending pensioners. Buses from all over were parked along the side streets, every hotel I called at was full, and in every dining room I could see crowds — veritable oceans — of nodding white heads spooning soup and conversing happily. Goodness knows what had brought them to the Welsh seaside at this bleak time of year.

 

Farther on along the front there stood a clutch of guesthouses, large and virtually indistinguishable, and a few of them had vacancy signs in their windows. I had eight or ten to choose from, which always puts me in a mild fret because I have an unerring instinct for choosing badly. My wife can survey a row of guesthouses and instantly identify the one run by a white-haired widow with a fondness for children, and sparkling bathroom facilities, whereas I can generally count on choosing the one run by a guy with a grasping manner, and the sort of cough that makes you wonder where he puts the phlegm. Such, I felt, would be the case tonight.

 

All the guesthouses had boards out front listing their many amenities -COLOUR TV, HOSPITALITY TRAYS, FULL CENTRAL HEATING, and the coyly euphemistic EN SUITE ALL ROOMS, meaning private bathrooms. One place offered satellite TV and a trouser press, and another boasted CURRENT FIRE CERTIFICATE — something I had never thought to look for in a B&B. All this heightened my sense of unease and doom. How could I possibly choose intelligently among such a variety of options?

 

I selected a place that looked reasonable enough from the outside — its board promised a color TV and coffee making facilities, about all I require these days for a Saturday night — but from the moment I set foot in the door I knew it was a bad choice. I was about to turn and flee when the owner emerged from a back room and stopped my retreat with an unenthusiastic “Yes?” A short conversation revealed that a single room with breakfast was for £19.50. It was entirely out of the question that I would stay the night in such a dismal place at such an exorbitant price, so I said,

“That sounds fine,” and signed in. Well, it’s so hard to say no.

 

My room was everything I expected it to be — cold and cheerless with laminated furniture, grubbily matted carpet, and those mysterious ceiling stains that bring to mind a neglected corpse in the room above. There was a tray of coffee things but the cups were disgusting, and the spoon was stuck to the tray.

 

The bathroom, faintly illuminated by a distant light activated by a length of string, had curling floor tiles and years of accumulated dirt packed into every corner. I peered at the yellowy tile around the bath and sink and realized what the landlord did with his phlegm. A bath was out of the question, so I threw some cold water on my face, dried it with a towel that had the texture of shredded wheat, and gladly took my leave.

13.

The phrase “veritable oceans” in paragraph 2 refers to

 

1) hotel dining rooms.

2) hotel guests wearing white hats.

3) old people dining in cafes.

4) buses crowded with old Welsh people.


Llandudno

Llandudno is truly a fine and handsome place, built on a generously proportioned bay and lined along its broad front with a huddle of prim but gracious nineteenth- century hotels that reminded me in the fading light of a lineup of Victorian nannies. Llandudno was purpose-built as a resort in the mid-1800s, and it cultivates a nice old-fashioned air. I don’t suppose that Lewis Carroll, who famously strolled this front with little Alice Liddell in the 1860s, would notice a great deal of change today.

 

To my consternation, the town was packed with weekending pensioners. Buses from all over were parked along the side streets, every hotel I called at was full, and in every dining room I could see crowds — veritable oceans — of nodding white heads spooning soup and conversing happily. Goodness knows what had brought them to the Welsh seaside at this bleak time of year.

 

Farther on along the front there stood a clutch of guesthouses, large and virtually indistinguishable, and a few of them had vacancy signs in their windows. I had eight or ten to choose from, which always puts me in a mild fret because I have an unerring instinct for choosing badly. My wife can survey a row of guesthouses and instantly identify the one run by a white-haired widow with a fondness for children, and sparkling bathroom facilities, whereas I can generally count on choosing the one run by a guy with a grasping manner, and the sort of cough that makes you wonder where he puts the phlegm. Such, I felt, would be the case tonight.

 

All the guesthouses had boards out front listing their many amenities -COLOUR TV, HOSPITALITY TRAYS, FULL CENTRAL HEATING, and the coyly euphemistic EN SUITE ALL ROOMS, meaning private bathrooms. One place offered satellite TV and a trouser press, and another boasted CURRENT FIRE CERTIFICATE — something I had never thought to look for in a B&B. All this heightened my sense of unease and doom. How could I possibly choose intelligently among such a variety of options?

 

I selected a place that looked reasonable enough from the outside — its board promised a color TV and coffee making facilities, about all I require these days for a Saturday night — but from the moment I set foot in the door I knew it was a bad choice. I was about to turn and flee when the owner emerged from a back room and stopped my retreat with an unenthusiastic “Yes?” A short conversation revealed that a single room with breakfast was for £19.50. It was entirely out of the question that I would stay the night in such a dismal place at such an exorbitant price, so I said,

“That sounds fine,” and signed in. Well, it’s so hard to say no.

 

My room was everything I expected it to be — cold and cheerless with laminated furniture, grubbily matted carpet, and those mysterious ceiling stains that bring to mind a neglected corpse in the room above. There was a tray of coffee things but the cups were disgusting, and the spoon was stuck to the tray.

 

The bathroom, faintly illuminated by a distant light activated by a length of string, had curling floor tiles and years of accumulated dirt packed into every corner. I peered at the yellowy tile around the bath and sink and realized what the landlord did with his phlegm. A bath was out of the question, so I threw some cold water on my face, dried it with a towel that had the texture of shredded wheat, and gladly took my leave.

14.

When choosing a guesthouse the narrator was worried because he

 

1) wasn’t good at making the right choice.

2) could not find a place run by a kind old widow.

3) did not know what to look for.

4) missed his wife for help.


Llandudno

Llandudno is truly a fine and handsome place, built on a generously proportioned bay and lined along its broad front with a huddle of prim but gracious nineteenth- century hotels that reminded me in the fading light of a lineup of Victorian nannies. Llandudno was purpose-built as a resort in the mid-1800s, and it cultivates a nice old-fashioned air. I don’t suppose that Lewis Carroll, who famously strolled this front with little Alice Liddell in the 1860s, would notice a great deal of change today.

 

To my consternation, the town was packed with weekending pensioners. Buses from all over were parked along the side streets, every hotel I called at was full, and in every dining room I could see crowds — veritable oceans — of nodding white heads spooning soup and conversing happily. Goodness knows what had brought them to the Welsh seaside at this bleak time of year.

 

Farther on along the front there stood a clutch of guesthouses, large and virtually indistinguishable, and a few of them had vacancy signs in their windows. I had eight or ten to choose from, which always puts me in a mild fret because I have an unerring instinct for choosing badly. My wife can survey a row of guesthouses and instantly identify the one run by a white-haired widow with a fondness for children, and sparkling bathroom facilities, whereas I can generally count on choosing the one run by a guy with a grasping manner, and the sort of cough that makes you wonder where he puts the phlegm. Such, I felt, would be the case tonight.

 

All the guesthouses had boards out front listing their many amenities -COLOUR TV, HOSPITALITY TRAYS, FULL CENTRAL HEATING, and the coyly euphemistic EN SUITE ALL ROOMS, meaning private bathrooms. One place offered satellite TV and a trouser press, and another boasted CURRENT FIRE CERTIFICATE — something I had never thought to look for in a B&B. All this heightened my sense of unease and doom. How could I possibly choose intelligently among such a variety of options?

 

I selected a place that looked reasonable enough from the outside — its board promised a color TV and coffee making facilities, about all I require these days for a Saturday night — but from the moment I set foot in the door I knew it was a bad choice. I was about to turn and flee when the owner emerged from a back room and stopped my retreat with an unenthusiastic “Yes?” A short conversation revealed that a single room with breakfast was for £19.50. It was entirely out of the question that I would stay the night in such a dismal place at such an exorbitant price, so I said,

“That sounds fine,” and signed in. Well, it’s so hard to say no.

 

My room was everything I expected it to be — cold and cheerless with laminated furniture, grubbily matted carpet, and those mysterious ceiling stains that bring to mind a neglected corpse in the room above. There was a tray of coffee things but the cups were disgusting, and the spoon was stuck to the tray.

 

The bathroom, faintly illuminated by a distant light activated by a length of string, had curling floor tiles and years of accumulated dirt packed into every corner. I peered at the yellowy tile around the bath and sink and realized what the landlord did with his phlegm. A bath was out of the question, so I threw some cold water on my face, dried it with a towel that had the texture of shredded wheat, and gladly took my leave.

15.

The narrator thought that the choice of a guesthouse used to be easier because

 

1) all hotels had a private bathroom.

2) there were fewer options on offer.

3) there were fewer guest houses.

4) they were all of B&B type.


Llandudno

Llandudno is truly a fine and handsome place, built on a generously proportioned bay and lined along its broad front with a huddle of prim but gracious nineteenth- century hotels that reminded me in the fading light of a lineup of Victorian nannies. Llandudno was purpose-built as a resort in the mid-1800s, and it cultivates a nice old-fashioned air. I don’t suppose that Lewis Carroll, who famously strolled this front with little Alice Liddell in the 1860s, would notice a great deal of change today.

 

To my consternation, the town was packed with weekending pensioners. Buses from all over were parked along the side streets, every hotel I called at was full, and in every dining room I could see crowds — veritable oceans — of nodding white heads spooning soup and conversing happily. Goodness knows what had brought them to the Welsh seaside at this bleak time of year.

 

Farther on along the front there stood a clutch of guesthouses, large and virtually indistinguishable, and a few of them had vacancy signs in their windows. I had eight or ten to choose from, which always puts me in a mild fret because I have an unerring instinct for choosing badly. My wife can survey a row of guesthouses and instantly identify the one run by a white-haired widow with a fondness for children, and sparkling bathroom facilities, whereas I can generally count on choosing the one run by a guy with a grasping manner, and the sort of cough that makes you wonder where he puts the phlegm. Such, I felt, would be the case tonight.

 

All the guesthouses had boards out front listing their many amenities -COLOUR TV, HOSPITALITY TRAYS, FULL CENTRAL HEATING, and the coyly euphemistic EN SUITE ALL ROOMS, meaning private bathrooms. One place offered satellite TV and a trouser press, and another boasted CURRENT FIRE CERTIFICATE — something I had never thought to look for in a B&B. All this heightened my sense of unease and doom. How could I possibly choose intelligently among such a variety of options?

 

I selected a place that looked reasonable enough from the outside — its board promised a color TV and coffee making facilities, about all I require these days for a Saturday night — but from the moment I set foot in the door I knew it was a bad choice. I was about to turn and flee when the owner emerged from a back room and stopped my retreat with an unenthusiastic “Yes?” A short conversation revealed that a single room with breakfast was for £19.50. It was entirely out of the question that I would stay the night in such a dismal place at such an exorbitant price, so I said,

“That sounds fine,” and signed in. Well, it’s so hard to say no.

 

My room was everything I expected it to be — cold and cheerless with laminated furniture, grubbily matted carpet, and those mysterious ceiling stains that bring to mind a neglected corpse in the room above. There was a tray of coffee things but the cups were disgusting, and the spoon was stuck to the tray.

 

The bathroom, faintly illuminated by a distant light activated by a length of string, had curling floor tiles and years of accumulated dirt packed into every corner. I peered at the yellowy tile around the bath and sink and realized what the landlord did with his phlegm. A bath was out of the question, so I threw some cold water on my face, dried it with a towel that had the texture of shredded wheat, and gladly took my leave.

16.

Why did the narrator agree to the room?

 

1) He felt sorry for the landlord.

2) He could not refuse the offer.

3) It was really cheap.

4) There was a TV and a coffee maker.


Llandudno

Llandudno is truly a fine and handsome place, built on a generously proportioned bay and lined along its broad front with a huddle of prim but gracious nineteenth- century hotels that reminded me in the fading light of a lineup of Victorian nannies. Llandudno was purpose-built as a resort in the mid-1800s, and it cultivates a nice old-fashioned air. I don’t suppose that Lewis Carroll, who famously strolled this front with little Alice Liddell in the 1860s, would notice a great deal of change today.

 

To my consternation, the town was packed with weekending pensioners. Buses from all over were parked along the side streets, every hotel I called at was full, and in every dining room I could see crowds — veritable oceans — of nodding white heads spooning soup and conversing happily. Goodness knows what had brought them to the Welsh seaside at this bleak time of year.

 

Farther on along the front there stood a clutch of guesthouses, large and virtually indistinguishable, and a few of them had vacancy signs in their windows. I had eight or ten to choose from, which always puts me in a mild fret because I have an unerring instinct for choosing badly. My wife can survey a row of guesthouses and instantly identify the one run by a white-haired widow with a fondness for children, and sparkling bathroom facilities, whereas I can generally count on choosing the one run by a guy with a grasping manner, and the sort of cough that makes you wonder where he puts the phlegm. Such, I felt, would be the case tonight.

 

All the guesthouses had boards out front listing their many amenities -COLOUR TV, HOSPITALITY TRAYS, FULL CENTRAL HEATING, and the coyly euphemistic EN SUITE ALL ROOMS, meaning private bathrooms. One place offered satellite TV and a trouser press, and another boasted CURRENT FIRE CERTIFICATE — something I had never thought to look for in a B&B. All this heightened my sense of unease and doom. How could I possibly choose intelligently among such a variety of options?

 

I selected a place that looked reasonable enough from the outside — its board promised a color TV and coffee making facilities, about all I require these days for a Saturday night — but from the moment I set foot in the door I knew it was a bad choice. I was about to turn and flee when the owner emerged from a back room and stopped my retreat with an unenthusiastic “Yes?” A short conversation revealed that a single room with breakfast was for £19.50. It was entirely out of the question that I would stay the night in such a dismal place at such an exorbitant price, so I said,

“That sounds fine,” and signed in. Well, it’s so hard to say no.

 

My room was everything I expected it to be — cold and cheerless with laminated furniture, grubbily matted carpet, and those mysterious ceiling stains that bring to mind a neglected corpse in the room above. There was a tray of coffee things but the cups were disgusting, and the spoon was stuck to the tray.

 

The bathroom, faintly illuminated by a distant light activated by a length of string, had curling floor tiles and years of accumulated dirt packed into every corner. I peered at the yellowy tile around the bath and sink and realized what the landlord did with his phlegm. A bath was out of the question, so I threw some cold water on my face, dried it with a towel that had the texture of shredded wheat, and gladly took my leave.

17.

Why was the bath out of the question?

 

1) The water was too cold.

2) There was no hot water.

3) The bathtub was dirty.

4) There was no light.


Llandudno

Llandudno is truly a fine and handsome place, built on a generously proportioned bay and lined along its broad front with a huddle of prim but gracious nineteenth- century hotels that reminded me in the fading light of a lineup of Victorian nannies. Llandudno was purpose-built as a resort in the mid-1800s, and it cultivates a nice old-fashioned air. I don’t suppose that Lewis Carroll, who famously strolled this front with little Alice Liddell in the 1860s, would notice a great deal of change today.

 

To my consternation, the town was packed with weekending pensioners. Buses from all over were parked along the side streets, every hotel I called at was full, and in every dining room I could see crowds — veritable oceans — of nodding white heads spooning soup and conversing happily. Goodness knows what had brought them to the Welsh seaside at this bleak time of year.

 

Farther on along the front there stood a clutch of guesthouses, large and virtually indistinguishable, and a few of them had vacancy signs in their windows. I had eight or ten to choose from, which always puts me in a mild fret because I have an unerring instinct for choosing badly. My wife can survey a row of guesthouses and instantly identify the one run by a white-haired widow with a fondness for children, and sparkling bathroom facilities, whereas I can generally count on choosing the one run by a guy with a grasping manner, and the sort of cough that makes you wonder where he puts the phlegm. Such, I felt, would be the case tonight.

 

All the guesthouses had boards out front listing their many amenities -COLOUR TV, HOSPITALITY TRAYS, FULL CENTRAL HEATING, and the coyly euphemistic EN SUITE ALL ROOMS, meaning private bathrooms. One place offered satellite TV and a trouser press, and another boasted CURRENT FIRE CERTIFICATE — something I had never thought to look for in a B&B. All this heightened my sense of unease and doom. How could I possibly choose intelligently among such a variety of options?

 

I selected a place that looked reasonable enough from the outside — its board promised a color TV and coffee making facilities, about all I require these days for a Saturday night — but from the moment I set foot in the door I knew it was a bad choice. I was about to turn and flee when the owner emerged from a back room and stopped my retreat with an unenthusiastic “Yes?” A short conversation revealed that a single room with breakfast was for £19.50. It was entirely out of the question that I would stay the night in such a dismal place at such an exorbitant price, so I said,

“That sounds fine,” and signed in. Well, it’s so hard to say no.

 

My room was everything I expected it to be — cold and cheerless with laminated furniture, grubbily matted carpet, and those mysterious ceiling stains that bring to mind a neglected corpse in the room above. There was a tray of coffee things but the cups were disgusting, and the spoon was stuck to the tray.

 

The bathroom, faintly illuminated by a distant light activated by a length of string, had curling floor tiles and years of accumulated dirt packed into every corner. I peered at the yellowy tile around the bath and sink and realized what the landlord did with his phlegm. A bath was out of the question, so I threw some cold water on my face, dried it with a towel that had the texture of shredded wheat, and gladly took my leave.

18.

What is the narrator’s attitude towards the room he stayed in?

 

1) Surprised.

2) Indifferent.

3) Positive.

4) Critical.


Llandudno

Llandudno is truly a fine and handsome place, built on a generously proportioned bay and lined along its broad front with a huddle of prim but gracious nineteenth- century hotels that reminded me in the fading light of a lineup of Victorian nannies. Llandudno was purpose-built as a resort in the mid-1800s, and it cultivates a nice old-fashioned air. I don’t suppose that Lewis Carroll, who famously strolled this front with little Alice Liddell in the 1860s, would notice a great deal of change today.

 

To my consternation, the town was packed with weekending pensioners. Buses from all over were parked along the side streets, every hotel I called at was full, and in every dining room I could see crowds — veritable oceans — of nodding white heads spooning soup and conversing happily. Goodness knows what had brought them to the Welsh seaside at this bleak time of year.

 

Farther on along the front there stood a clutch of guesthouses, large and virtually indistinguishable, and a few of them had vacancy signs in their windows. I had eight or ten to choose from, which always puts me in a mild fret because I have an unerring instinct for choosing badly. My wife can survey a row of guesthouses and instantly identify the one run by a white-haired widow with a fondness for children, and sparkling bathroom facilities, whereas I can generally count on choosing the one run by a guy with a grasping manner, and the sort of cough that makes you wonder where he puts the phlegm. Such, I felt, would be the case tonight.

 

All the guesthouses had boards out front listing their many amenities -COLOUR TV, HOSPITALITY TRAYS, FULL CENTRAL HEATING, and the coyly euphemistic EN SUITE ALL ROOMS, meaning private bathrooms. One place offered satellite TV and a trouser press, and another boasted CURRENT FIRE CERTIFICATE — something I had never thought to look for in a B&B. All this heightened my sense of unease and doom. How could I possibly choose intelligently among such a variety of options?

 

I selected a place that looked reasonable enough from the outside — its board promised a color TV and coffee making facilities, about all I require these days for a Saturday night — but from the moment I set foot in the door I knew it was a bad choice. I was about to turn and flee when the owner emerged from a back room and stopped my retreat with an unenthusiastic “Yes?” A short conversation revealed that a single room with breakfast was for £19.50. It was entirely out of the question that I would stay the night in such a dismal place at such an exorbitant price, so I said,

“That sounds fine,” and signed in. Well, it’s so hard to say no.

 

My room was everything I expected it to be — cold and cheerless with laminated furniture, grubbily matted carpet, and those mysterious ceiling stains that bring to mind a neglected corpse in the room above. There was a tray of coffee things but the cups were disgusting, and the spoon was stuck to the tray.

 

The bathroom, faintly illuminated by a distant light activated by a length of string, had curling floor tiles and years of accumulated dirt packed into every corner. I peered at the yellowy tile around the bath and sink and realized what the landlord did with his phlegm. A bath was out of the question, so I threw some cold water on my face, dried it with a towel that had the texture of shredded wheat, and gladly took my leave.

19.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово LOCATE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

New Zealand: geography

 

New Zealand consists of two main islands and a number of smaller islands so scattered that they range from the tropical to the Antarctic. New Zealand __________________ about 2,012 km southeast of Australia.

20.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово SEPARATE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

The North Island and the South Island __________________ by Cook Strait. The North Island is 829 km long and volcanic in its south-central part.

21.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово HIGH так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

South Island has the Southern Alps along its west coast, with Mount Cook being the __________________ point. Other inhabited islands include Stewart Island, the Chatham Islands, and Great Barrier Island.

22.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово FIGHT так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Enough is enough

 

A woman came to President Abraham Lincoln and told him with a commanding air: “Mr. President, you must make my son a general. Sir, I demand it not as a favor, but as a right. My grandfather __________________ at Lexington.

23.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово NOT RUN так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

My father was the only man who __________________ away at Bladensburg.

24.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово KILL так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

My husband __________________ at Monterrey.”

25.

Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово DO так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

“I guess, madam,” said Lincoln, “your family __________________ enough for the country. It is time to give somebody else a chance.”

26.

Образуйте от слова COMPETE однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

Texas Rodeo

The rodeo is a really exciting event. It is a thrilling __________________ between cowboys from all over the country.

27.

Образуйте от слова PROFESSION однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

It has a long tradition and even today there are rodeo schools which keep it alive and __________________.

28.

Образуйте от слова VISIT однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

The rodeo is a spectacular sight. If a __________________ has a place in the first row of the arena, he or she may even be sprinkled with sand by the passing horses.

29.

Образуйте от слова PERFORM однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

The __________________ usually starts with an opening ceremony by horsemen dressed in bright colours and carrying flags.

30.

Образуйте от слова CONSTANT однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

All through the show the master of the ceremony __________________ jokes with special clowns.

31.

Образуйте от слова POSSIBLE однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.

 

A rodeo in Texas is certainly an exciting experience which is practically __________________ for a tourist to forget.

32.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) realise

2) consider

3) have

4) believe


New Family Member

Tracey and her sister had always wanted their own horse. And although neither of them had much spare money, they were about to 32 ______ their dream. The tricky part was not getting a horse but actually finding somewhere to keep one. But eventually Mrs. Richards agreed to let the girls 33 ______ a small field at the far end of the farm. This was going to 34 ______ them £500 a year but it would work out at just over 20 pounds per month each which was OK. The horse himself was coming from the Horse Rescue Charity. They would need to make a small donation

every year to cover the cost of an animal welfare inspector who would visit twice a year. The 35 ______ expenses after this would be for food and vet bills. But the two girls were 36 ______ that they could manage and were committed to going ahead. And it was a big commitment. They were getting an eighteen month old skewbald colt named Domino. Horses often live over twenty years and the sisters were taking him on 37 ______ life. Actually they had plans to get another horse as a friend for Domino. But first of all Domino would need to settle down. He had been badly treated by his previous owners and was still a bit nervous and difficult to 38 ______ .

33.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) borrow

2) pay

3) rent

4) lend


New Family Member

Tracey and her sister had always wanted their own horse. And although neither of them had much spare money, they were about to 32 ______ their dream. The tricky part was not getting a horse but actually finding somewhere to keep one. But eventually Mrs. Richards agreed to let the girls 33 ______ a small field at the far end of the farm. This was going to 34 ______ them £500 a year but it would work out at just over 20 pounds per month each which was OK. The horse himself was coming from the Horse Rescue Charity. They would need to make a small donation

every year to cover the cost of an animal welfare inspector who would visit twice a year. The 35 ______ expenses after this would be for food and vet bills. But the two girls were 36 ______ that they could manage and were committed to going ahead. And it was a big commitment. They were getting an eighteen month old skewbald colt named Domino. Horses often live over twenty years and the sisters were taking him on 37 ______ life. Actually they had plans to get another horse as a friend for Domino. But first of all Domino would need to settle down. He had been badly treated by his previous owners and was still a bit nervous and difficult to 38 ______ .

34.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) charge

2) fee

3) pay

4) cost


New Family Member

Tracey and her sister had always wanted their own horse. And although neither of them had much spare money, they were about to 32 ______ their dream. The tricky part was not getting a horse but actually finding somewhere to keep one. But eventually Mrs. Richards agreed to let the girls 33 ______ a small field at the far end of the farm. This was going to 34 ______ them £500 a year but it would work out at just over 20 pounds per month each which was OK. The horse himself was coming from the Horse Rescue Charity. They would need to make a small donation

every year to cover the cost of an animal welfare inspector who would visit twice a year. The 35 ______ expenses after this would be for food and vet bills. But the two girls were 36 ______ that they could manage and were committed to going ahead. And it was a big commitment. They were getting an eighteen month old skewbald colt named Domino. Horses often live over twenty years and the sisters were taking him on 37 ______ life. Actually they had plans to get another horse as a friend for Domino. But first of all Domino would need to settle down. He had been badly treated by his previous owners and was still a bit nervous and difficult to 38 ______ .

35.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) longest

2) biggest

3) hugest

4) tallest


New Family Member

Tracey and her sister had always wanted their own horse. And although neither of them had much spare money, they were about to 32 ______ their dream. The tricky part was not getting a horse but actually finding somewhere to keep one. But eventually Mrs. Richards agreed to let the girls 33 ______ a small field at the far end of the farm. This was going to 34 ______ them £500 a year but it would work out at just over 20 pounds per month each which was OK. The horse himself was coming from the Horse Rescue Charity. They would need to make a small donation

every year to cover the cost of an animal welfare inspector who would visit twice a year. The 35 ______ expenses after this would be for food and vet bills. But the two girls were 36 ______ that they could manage and were committed to going ahead. And it was a big commitment. They were getting an eighteen month old skewbald colt named Domino. Horses often live over twenty years and the sisters were taking him on 37 ______ life. Actually they had plans to get another horse as a friend for Domino. But first of all Domino would need to settle down. He had been badly treated by his previous owners and was still a bit nervous and difficult to 38 ______ .

36.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) assured

2) comfortable

3) thoughtful

4) confident


New Family Member

Tracey and her sister had always wanted their own horse. And although neither of them had much spare money, they were about to 32 ______ their dream. The tricky part was not getting a horse but actually finding somewhere to keep one. But eventually Mrs. Richards agreed to let the girls 33 ______ a small field at the far end of the farm. This was going to 34 ______ them £500 a year but it would work out at just over 20 pounds per month each which was OK. The horse himself was coming from the Horse Rescue Charity. They would need to make a small donation

every year to cover the cost of an animal welfare inspector who would visit twice a year. The 35 ______ expenses after this would be for food and vet bills. But the two girls were 36 ______ that they could manage and were committed to going ahead. And it was a big commitment. They were getting an eighteen month old skewbald colt named Domino. Horses often live over twenty years and the sisters were taking him on 37 ______ life. Actually they had plans to get another horse as a friend for Domino. But first of all Domino would need to settle down. He had been badly treated by his previous owners and was still a bit nervous and difficult to 38 ______ .

37.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) for

2) during

3) at

4) to


New Family Member

Tracey and her sister had always wanted their own horse. And although neither of them had much spare money, they were about to 32 ______ their dream. The tricky part was not getting a horse but actually finding somewhere to keep one. But eventually Mrs. Richards agreed to let the girls 33 ______ a small field at the far end of the farm. This was going to 34 ______ them £500 a year but it would work out at just over 20 pounds per month each which was OK. The horse himself was coming from the Horse Rescue Charity. They would need to make a small donation

every year to cover the cost of an animal welfare inspector who would visit twice a year. The 35 ______ expenses after this would be for food and vet bills. But the two girls were 36 ______ that they could manage and were committed to going ahead. And it was a big commitment. They were getting an eighteen month old skewbald colt named Domino. Horses often live over twenty years and the sisters were taking him on 37 ______ life. Actually they had plans to get another horse as a friend for Domino. But first of all Domino would need to settle down. He had been badly treated by his previous owners and was still a bit nervous and difficult to 38 ______ .

38.

Вставьте пропущенное слово:

 

1) deal

2) agree

3) handle

4) cope


New Family Member

Tracey and her sister had always wanted their own horse. And although neither of them had much spare money, they were about to 32 ______ their dream. The tricky part was not getting a horse but actually finding somewhere to keep one. But eventually Mrs. Richards agreed to let the girls 33 ______ a small field at the far end of the farm. This was going to 34 ______ them £500 a year but it would work out at just over 20 pounds per month each which was OK. The horse himself was coming from the Horse Rescue Charity. They would need to make a small donation

every year to cover the cost of an animal welfare inspector who would visit twice a year. The 35 ______ expenses after this would be for food and vet bills. But the two girls were 36 ______ that they could manage and were committed to going ahead. And it was a big commitment. They were getting an eighteen month old skewbald colt named Domino. Horses often live over twenty years and the sisters were taking him on 37 ______ life. Actually they had plans to get another horse as a friend for Domino. But first of all Domino would need to settle down. He had been badly treated by his previous owners and was still a bit nervous and difficult to 38 ______ .

39.

You have received a letter from your English-speaking pen-friend Tom who writes:

 

Last month our class went to Washington to visit the National Museum of American History. It was my first visit there and it was fun! How often do you go to museums with your class, if at all? Which museum is your favorite or what museum would you like to visit? Why do you think people should go there? This summer we plan to go hiking with my parents.

 

Write a letter to Tom. In your letter answer his questions, ask 3 questions about his summer plans. Write 100–140 words. Remember the rules of letter writing.

40.

Выберите только ОДНО из двух предложенных высказываний и выразите своё мнение по предложенной проблеме согласно данному плану.

 

Comment on one of the following statements.

 

1. It's more enjoyable to live in a big family.

2. Some parents think that having a computer at home will help their children to get a better education.

 

What is your opinion? Do you agree with this statement? Write 200–250 words. Use the following plan:

− make an introduction (state the problem)

− express your personal opinion and give 2–3 reasons for your opinion

− express an opposing opinion and give 1–2 reasons for this opposing opinion

− explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion

− make a conclusion restating your position

41.

Imagine that you are preparing a project with your friend. You have found some interesting material for the presentation and you want to read this text to your friend. You have 1.5 minutes to read the text silently, then be ready to read it out aloud. You will not have more than 1.5 minutes to read it.

 

What does the Moon smell like? Like gunpowder, apparently. Only twelve people have walked on the moon, all of them American. Obviously, in their airtight space suits the astronauts could not actually smell the Moon, but moondust is clingy stuff, and plenty of it was traipsed back into the cabin when they returned from the Moon’s surface. They reported that moondust feels like snow, smells like gunpowder, and doesn’t taste too bad.

Moon’s surface. It also contains minerals like iron, calcium and magnesium. NASA employs a small team to sniff every single piece of equipment which goes onto its space flights. This is to ensure that no items which could change the delicate balance of the climate of the International Space Station make it on to shuttles. The idea that the Moon was made of cheese seems to date from the sixteenth century. The first citation from John Heywood says that the moon is made of green cheese.

42.

Study the advertisement.

 

You are considering visiting Universal Studios while travelling to Los Angeles with a group of friends of yours, and now you’d like to get more information. In 1.5 minutes you are to ask five direct questions to find out about the following:

1) working hours

2) ticket cost for a group of teenagers

3) discounts on the weekdays

4) chance to meet famous actors

5) getting to Universal Studios by public transportation

You have 20 seconds to ask each question.

43.

These are photos from your photo album. Choose one photo to describe to your friend.

 

 

You will have to start speaking in 1.5 minutes and will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). In your talk remember to speak about:

 

• where and when the photo was taken

• what/who is in the photo

• what is happening

• why you keep the photo in your album

• why you decided to show the picture to your friend

 

You have to talk continuously, starting with: "I’ve chosen photo number … ".

44.

Study the two photographs. In 1.5 minutes be ready to compare and contrast the photographs:

 

• give a brief description of the photos (action, location)

• say what the pictures have in common

• say in what way the pictures are different

• say what kind of running presented in the photos you'd prefer

• explain why

 

You will speak for not more than 2 minutes (12–15 sentences). You have to talk continuously.